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^he Gospel Messenger 



"SET FOR THE DEFENSE OF THE GOSPEL."— PhiL 1: 17. 



■vr*4 . 



Vol. 46. 



Elgin, III., January 5, 1907. 



No. 1. ■ 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. A "Roosevelt third term national league'' 

Editorial,— has h<:ea or g aI >ized, the name indicating its purpose. 

Doing our Best, 8 The platform says that the president has become to 

f he Humdrum °U Ute, ' \ \ \ ■ ; . I '. \ \ ] ! \ [ \ \ \ \ \ [ ! \ \ [ \ \ \ \ I th " e pe0 P le " a P ublic necessity, an essential part of 

Not Sent to Baptize, 10 things in the social and political fabric." We believe 

A^AiaLTng'condUion' 1 ^::::::::::::::::::::::::^ that he lias done the «* tr y ?■«* ^<*> * service 

Approaching Death, . . .' 10 which perhaps few men would have had the courage to 

TheWrons Spirit 10 undertake ; but we do not believe he is the only man 

^ T&gmentary Supplement to the Life and Labors J!' 10 Ca " f^ tlliS government in the right waj, 

of Eld. John Kline, and Other Items of Interest ^ lie precedent set by Washington was a good one 

■' EI der t John CO MeL r ger\? f o 1 u 8 r 6 1v I eS„g'in V 18 T S e 9 ete B j y * ^'^ R °° SeWlt acknowledged this when he 

Calvin Bright, 2 declared immediately after the election of 1904 that 

^l^rhi^Si h Z^ZZll\l% h Ti. ' he WOuld 110t be a candidate fOT « a «ept another 

Hoover, 3 nomination. We do not believe he has changed his 

Sen Htmcled^t"^ ^Aiz MiiieV \ "™ l ? nd ™ Sh ° M Sta " d °PP° Md to a **# *™ 

Baptism of the Holy Spirit. By E. L. Carter 5 eve » i' he had changed. It is not a question of a 

Yc ba^ Wknes ! es r I : uke . 24: . 48 .-. By . c ' H '. Bals :6 man or a party ' but of a p rinci p' e Wllkh camot be 

God is Wisdom, God is Love. By Ida M. Helm, .! 6 violated without great danger to the future freedom 

Th L m ? - C t iW S 5 a Ji L n-i Th T- t^ ™ Karn ' ■ ' f of the American people. 

The Minister and the Bible. By D. Hays 6 

Home and Family, — ,-. ,,, , . •■ 

The Palace Without a Care. By Elizabeth D. Ros- VJUEEN WILHELMINA at the opening of the states- 

enberger ■■■■■■■■;. • 7 general some weeks ago spoke of the plans of the 

thanksgiving on the Mediterranean. Bv S. M .--..,■ , , - , „ ., .. 

Goughnour 7 Present ministry to dram and reclaim the Zuider Zee, 

Sisters' Aid Societies, . ., 7 either in part, or, if sufficient funds could be voted for 

General Missionary and Tract Department,— it, as a whole. It was thought by most of the people 

F?o n m pSTKdFa^Bf Flor'ene^keVpittVnger.'ll '° ^ ° Ut ° f the *»**■ But the present minister of 

From Bulsar, India. By Gertrude E. Emmert 11 waterways in Holland is an eminent engineer who was 

JM-om Quinter, Kans. By J. E. Springer 11 last year emp l oyed by the Chilean government to build 

ARClllNn THF U/rtDin the new harbor of Valparaiso. The Zuider Zee Society 

... f JT WUKL. ll has presented to him an address on the subject. This 

,, , . <■ -"-.■" society has made the problem a studv for many years. 

PERSIA has become a more free country. Nca'rlv t. i . u- i- •.• .i .u • , . , 

.'. ... ■ ', .. , , , ; '"« '.' It place? at his disposition all the material gathered 

a year ago the shah granted his peop e a share n the ,„ j ,„.„„„ n.„, ,, , , , , , . .. 

„,, & ,. * " and tiroes that the work be undertaken as of the 

government. The new parliament met October 7, ■ „„ . t ,■ , • . T£ u. i , 

, , , ... , , , ' . , , , ' greatest national importance. If the suggestion of the 

welcomed by the shah who presided over the first ses- ° „;„, ■ . A ., ■„ , , , ., 

. . . K , _ society is acted upon the sea will be closed on the 

sion. A new constitution, signed Dec. 30 by the shah „„, f1 , . . , c , , „ , 

, . , * . . , to J north by an enormous dam from north £ jlland over 

and the crown prince, is the result of the labors of the the island of wieringe „ and alon the shallows an ,, 

assembly. The senate will be partly elective, and the sand banks of the coast of Fries , and „ ^ ^ u 

lower house will have hnancia control of the e-overn- j • i i i ■ -n L j i j TT .. i 

„, ,. . ""'"_."■ u. me govern drained, a whole province will be added to Holland 

ment. The parliament is to meet annually for the ant , room wi „ be provided for the exces5 p lation _ 

-ose of revising of laws and enacting such new The retun]s from the added territo wol , ld cover the 

s may be needed. It will fix its own compensation outlay in a conlparativeIy short time . 

provide for important reforms. Under the ab- : 

solute despotism of the old system, officials were Los Angeles, Cal„ is no doubt the most peculiarly 
responsible only to the shah. The crown prince has shaped city in the world, having recently annexed a 
signed a document to the effect that he will not strip half a mile wide and seventeen miles long, con- 
dissolve the present parliament for two years. Under necting it with the Pacific Ocean. The intention is 
the new order all Persians of the male sex between later to annex Wilmington and San Pedro, situated on 
the ages of thirty and seventy who are not in the San Pedro harbor, thus coming into possession of the 
service of the state and who have never been convicted only important port on the Pacific coast south of San 
of a crime are entitled to vote for members of the Francisco. In the strip of annexed territory is Ascot 
lower house. The shah is in feeble health and probably Park, the most important winter racing center in 
cannot live long. He has done much for the progress America. In California there is no state law against 
of his country by giving it a constitutional government, selling pools, and there had been much gambling at 

~ n " \ ~ „ this place just outside the city limits, and the people 

The Baroness Burdett-Coutts, England s greatest . .. .. , \, 1 ... 

, ., , . ,. , r , to . ° ot the citv were powerless. Now the gambling can 

woman philanthropist, died at London last Sunday, , , c ,/" .. ,._ - --»-» 

, . ' „ - be stopped, for there is a city ordinance against it. 

aged ninety-two. Long as;o King Edward ca led her „, ... tT . , , -u.iii in 

..A j , , r i? ? , .. T ^e citizens of Los Angeles also wish to hold a world s 

the second lath' ot England because ot her good ,- • ., • imc . i i . *u „. i *• r *i 

i A , . to fair there in 191 o to celebrate the completion of the 

works. At the age of twenty-three she inherited a r , , ■ , , ■ , 

, , . s , ' Panama canal, and have a universal peace congress 

toitune ot nine million dollars, and trom then until ■ ■ .. ... .. ( ■ tu~ . ~~~ ~' A _t n : n l.. 

. in conjunction with the fair. 1 hey are certainly 

her aeath was unceasing in her efforts to relieve dis- , . ., . . ... 

, , to laving their plans in time, 

tress and better the conditions of the poor. At the 

time of her death her fortune was estimated at two Three and a half years ago Alexander and Draga 

and a half millions, showing that she constantly gave of Servia were murdered, and soon afterwards Peter 

away much more than her income. In 1871 she was was called to the throne. The friends of the former 

made baroness in her own right by Queeen Victoria, king oppose the present one on account of the dis- 

of whom she was an intimate friend. She was also soluteness of the crown prince. It seems probable that 

much with Charles Dickens, and while he lived he was King Peter will receive a pension and retire to Geneva, 

one of her prinicpal advisers in her charitable work. Switzerland. That certainl.y' will be better for him 

Her gifts went to all classes and all sects. It would than ruling over subjects who may cause him to share 

be impossible to say how many thousand unfortunates the fate of his 'predecessor. Belgrade, the capital of 

were helped by her charitable work. If more of the Servia, is said to be one of the most beautiful cities 

lich had her spirit there would not be such a gulf be- of Europe. But political turmoils are constant and 

tween the rich and the poor of the world. the people have become poor because of them. Servia 




became independent in the eleventh century, bnl in 
the latter part of the fourteenth centur) lost its in- 
dependence and became a part of Turku in 

last century it became independent again !oi a I 

time, Russia assisting. Then for a few years it was 
governed by Turkey, and was finally separated 
Turkey in 1830. A constitution was framed in 

Servia is a very small country, being only a littli n 

than a third the size of Illinois. 



Last Sunday night there was a disastrous Wreck 
on the B. & (1. R. R„ „ear Washington, I). C. A 

passenger train of three coaches was on the w" 

Washington when the engine of a following train ran 
into it, plowing its way through two of the coaches 
and into the third. The passengers were principally 
women and children, and of the number fifty-three 
were killed and sixty or seventy injured. Somebody 
was reckless or careless, and more than a hundred 
others paid the penalty. Such accidents are too com- 
mon. A rigid investigation should fix the blame, and 
then the penalty should follow. Thousands of persons 
are constantly trusting their lives to the railways, and 
every precaution for their safety should be taken. 

Reports from Russia say that the bureaucracy has 
resumed its old business of graft and persecution. 
Concessions of great value, involving thousands of 
square miles of land and many mines, have- been 
secretly sold to foreign syndicates. Large appropria- 
tions have been made for the army and navy, but much 
of the money has been squandered by these men who 
seek only their own pleasure or profit, and who care 
little for the country or the prosperity and Happiness 
of the people. They have even spent nioirej- intended 
for the starving ones in the famine districts. There 
was a hope that some of the worst restrictions placed 
upon the Jews would be removed; but that hope must 
be abandoned. The grand dukes are said to consul! 
mediums regularly and to shower upon them gifts of 
money and jewelry. Not much is to be hoped for 
from such conditions. And the power of the bureau- 
cracy seems so secure that there is no prospect of a 
change very soon. 

A sokt of league has been formed at Atlanta, tla.. 
to solve the race problem. It was arranged that Dec. 
9 every minister in the city should preach " a sermon 
on obedience to law, upholding, in the presence of 
their respective congregations, the majesty of the law 
and pleading that criminals shall be punished to the 
extent of the law, and at the same time insisting that 
all punishment shall he administered under due pro- 
cess and by the authority of the law." This is a 
good beginning, and the men responsible for it are to 
be commended. The movement is essentially Chris- 
tian and will be directed by the Atlanta Business 
Men's Gospel Union, which has taken as a working 
basis the words of an Atlantic minister : " The Chris- 
tian religion is a working force, the function of which 
is to fashion men after the likeness of the loving Cod 
in whose image they were created. . . . While 
the Christian religion is a universal working power. 
its sphere is among persons who can reject or pervert 
or misdirect its provisions, or come into complete har- 
mony with them. What is on trial at this time in 
Georgia and at the South is not the Christian religion, 
but those of us who profess it. We are on trial before 
the onlooking world. We have been trying to solve 
tlie negro problem without calling to our aid the 
power of the Christian religion." If this movement 
becomes general in the South, and men really strive 
to solve the race problem bv Christian principles, the 
right solution will finally he reached, and Ivnchings 
and burnings will be no more. W^^ 



Id 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



ESS A YS 



"Study to show thyself approved unto God a workn.authat needetl. no! 
be ashamed, rightly dividing the Word of Truth.' 



A NEW YEAR'S HYMN. 



Break, new-born year, on glad eyes break! 

Melodious voices move! 
On. rolling Time! thou canst not make 

The Father cease to love. 
The parted year had winged feet; 

The Savior still doth stay: 
The New Year comes; but Spirit sweet, 

Thou goest not away. 
Our hearts in tears may oft run o'er; 

But, Lord, thy smile still beams; 
Our sins are swelling evermore; 

But pardoning grace still streams. 
Lord! from this year more service win, 

More glory, more delight! 
O make its hours less sad with sin! 

Its days with thee more bright! 
Then we may bless its precious things 

If earthly cheer should come, 
Or gladsome mount on angel wings 

If thou shouldst take us home. 

—Thomas H. Gill 



A FRAGMENTARY SUPPLEMENT TO THE LIFE 

AND LABORS OF ELD. JOHN KLINE, AND 

OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST AT THE 

CONFERENCE OF 1864. 



BY L. W. TEETER. 

I was much interested in reading the " Life of Eld. 
John Kline," in various ways. But I was disappointed 
in finding so brief an account of the Conference of 1864 
which proved to be his last. I felt then that, since this 
was his last attendance at Conference, and so shortly 
before his death, more should be written of his life 
and work there. Having a clear recollection of that 
Conference, I venture to give a brief account of his 
work, influence, etc. 

Likely, on account of the prominent part he per- 
formed at this Conference, his modesty forbade mak- 
ing extensive notes. On this account the editor of 
\the book had no resources to draw from. Hence • 
\either he nor the editor are to blame for the omission. 
What I shall write, properly belongs to notes of May 
13-lp, 1864, beginning on page 473 of " Life of John 
Klir/e." What I know of Eld. John Kline previous 
to this Conference was by reputation. But here I 
had a good opportunity to consider him for about 
six days. His saintly deportment, refined address, 
and his natural force of character were such that they 
could be felt when in his presence, especially by a 
young man in his nineteenth year. I can remember 
his venerable countenance, kindly, loving disposition, 
deep humility, with much firmness, however. He was 
a well-formed man, of good size, modestly dressed in 
an out-and-out blue jeans suit made strictly plain and 
well-fitting. 

Still more interest is associated with the reading 
of this book by all yet living in this locality who can 
call to mind the saddest of the events that occurred in 
the month of May, 1864. 

It was here, in the Nettle Creek congregation, a 
mile west of Hagerstown, near our large brick church, 
where Eld. John Kline was in attendance at the last 
Annual Meeting he ever attended, of which he was 
chosen and acted as its moderator. He arrived here 
at Hagerstown on Friday, May 13, and left on May 
19. Then, in' just one month from the time of this 
Annual Meeting, he was martyred. This was in the 
heat of the great civil war. Patriotic blood was at 
a high temperature ; and language is too feeble to 
express the excitement in this community when the 
sad news of his tragic death reached the ears of the 
people. 

The largest attendance at this Annual Meeting was 
estimated at fifteen thousand. Naturally, a very large 
percentage of this multitude resided in this community 
and had become somewhat familiar with its presiding 
officer. Many were the expressions of sympathy, and 
all felt that a great and good man had passed to his 
reward among the blessed. 

Immediately after the close of this Conference, he 



visited some of his old Virginia friends in an adjoining 
church to Nettle Creek, where he preached one of 
his last sermons in these parts, at the close of which 
he uttered a very touching benediction of Paul, ap- 
plying it to himself, which proved a positive forecast 
of— and, in a peaceful, resigned soul, a prelude to his 
eventful demise, in these words : " Now, brethren and 
friends, I have only touched some of the chords in the 
beautiful anthem of my theme. I now leave it with 
you, hoping that you may learn every note in it ; and 
by the sweet -music of a good life delight the ears 
and warm the hearts of all who hear its rich har- 
monies. Possibly you may never see my face or hear 
my voice again. I am now on my way back to Vir- 
ginia, not knowing the things that shall befall me 
there. It may be that bonds and afflictions abide me. 
But I feel that I have done nothing worthy of bonds 
or of death ; and none of these things move me ; neither 
count I my life dear unto myself, so that I may finish 
my course with joy, and the ministry which I have 
received of the Lord Jesus, to testify the Gospel of 
the grace of God." Only twenty-seven days later he 
fell asleep in Jesus. " Blessed sleep! " 

It is strengthening to the soul to entertain in fond 
memory the mob-martyrdom of a Stephen, and the 
capital execution of a Paul, — -for nothing worse than 
preaching, and living, a soul-saving GospeU Although 
we have not seen them with our natural eyes, yet as 
we think of them, and of their sweet spirits and last 
words, our hearts become filled to overflowing with 
sympathy for them, because they so bravely and 
heroically maintained their Christian honor into their 
very death. 

But Eld. John Kline many of us have seen with 
our own eyes. He was an evangelist, truly a modern 
apostle of God, who gave no uncertain sound of the 
Gospel of Jesus Christ. May we not truly say of him 
that he was a martyr for the truth as it is in Jesus, 
as really as Stephen and Paul? Yes; and of him it 
may be truly said, as of the first martyr, Abel, " He 
being dead yet speaketh." Heb. 11:4. 

At the time of this Conference I was not yet a 
member of the church. But I was much interested in 
the discussions, which were conducted mostly in a 
beautiful grove near by the old brick church. I 
recollect distinctly the appearance of some of the more 
prominent ministers, among whom were James Qu inter 
and Henry Kurtz, who were then editors and pub- 
lishers of the Gospel Visitor, a monthly publication, 
which was the only church paper or journal published 
in .behalf of the Brethren church at that time. Eld. 
D. P. Sayler was also here, and at his best, and proved 
himself a most forceful speaker. His words, like 
arrows, reached their destination. Among the rest 
was a brilliant coming giant mind in the person of the 
late Eld. R. H. Miller, then about thirty-six, who was 
not forward, but a great observer, fitting himself for 
future church work. 

At this Conference the Standing Committee con- 
sisted of only fourteen members, — only about one- 
third the number of Standing Committees of recent 
years. 

Associated with the work of this Conference, I 
name a few other items. It was here during this 
Conference that H. R. Holsinger solicited trial sub- 
scriptions for a weekly religious paper to be devoted 
to church work in general. He succeeded in securing 
enough subscriptions to begin its publication. It 
proved to be a neat little paper of sixteen pages, about 
half the size of the present Gospel Messenger. My 
father was one of those original subscribers, and for 
a number of years the paper was a weekly and wel- 
come visitor in our home, being published at Tyrone, 
Pa., under name of Christian Family Companion. It 
was in this paper that our renowned essayist, C. H. 
Balsbaugh, with his complete, rounded-out mental 
vocabulary, came into prominence before me. 

It was also at this Conference that W. C. Thurman 
came to the fore, with several of his productions, chief 
among which was his book entitled "The Sealed 
Book of ^Daniel Opened." The burden of the work 
was the solution of the problem of the exact time 
of Christ's second coming. He was a fine-looking 
man of splendid address, smooth-tongued, and 



attracted much attention. Almost every night during 
the Conference he preached in the neighboring barns 
where he had large audiences to listen to his doctrine. 
I was one who followed him several of those evenings 
to hear him demonstrate. At one of those meetings' 
an aged brother followed him, and said, substantially, 
that it was not so important to know when Christ 
would come the second time as it was to be always 
ready for his coming. 
Hagfrstoitm, Ind. 



ELDER JOHN METZGER AT OUR MEETING 
IN 1859. 



BY JOHN CALVIN BRIGHT. 

In 1859 the Bear Creek church rebuilt her meeting- 
house six miles west of Dayton, Ohio. Through the 
summer the meetings were held in the houses and 
barns of the members of the church. After what 
seemed to me, a boy of eight summers, a long time, 
the meeting came to our place. The spacious barn 
floor and mows were all arranged for the gathering. 
Our good mother, with the assistance of the kind 
neighbors, baked and cooked to feed all who would 
stay for dinner. 

It was an ideal summer day. And it seemed to me . 
as though nearly everybody was there. And the 
report widely spread that Eld. Johnny Metzger'was 
to preach had no little influence in swelling the crowd 
to unusual proportions. To my boyhood standpoint 
it was the culminating point in history. 

At a suitable hour, Brother Metzger came and 
received a glad welcome from my father and the 
older ministers. I never saw a nicer man, unless it 
was my father. His face fairly beamed with kindness, 
love and life. His raven locks hung down on his 
collar; his every action full of enthusiasm, and his 
words of the sweetest intonation and accent. I left 
my boy comrades to get closer to him. He noticed 
even little me and gave me the kindest " howdy" and 
said to my father, " Johnnie may be a preacher some 
day, too." I never had received such kind attentions 
from any one, and I lingered near the preachers, and 
when they started for the barn I followed along, 
feeling that I was almost if not altogether a son of 
a prophet. 

On the way to the barn my father asked Bro. 
Metzger to preach English as most of his neighbors 
could not understand German. Some of the older 
ministers asked him to preach German, as that was 
the language in which most of the services were con- 
ducted at Bear Creek at that time. 

After the somewhat extended introductory exer- 
cises, Brother Metzger took the floor and excusing 
himself to the German Brethren he spoke in English 
with great power and earnestness on the Vine and 
Branches. Every one was interested by his earnest 
entreaties and exhortations. The rafters fairly rang 
with the echoes of his musical voice. One remark 
was indelibly impressed on my memory. Referring 
to the tendrils which held the branches to the vine and 
arbor he said they represent our affections which hold 
us to Christ and the church ; but too often they 
represent our affections so closely wrapped around 
our purse that we cannot open it to give to the Lord 
his dues. 

I always think of this when I find myself slow in 
giving financially to the Lord's cause, and the same 
truth looms up before me when I see or hear of others 
who experience the same difficulty. 

Everybody said it was the best sermon they ever 

heard. I have never gpt away from the inspiration 

of that occasion, and I pray I never may until I realize 

its full import in clasping our departed brother in 

the climes of immortal youth and everlasting joy. 

Dayton, Ohio. 

>-*-* 

Six things are requisite to create a happy home. 
Integrity must be the architect, and tidiness the up- 
holsterer. It must be warmed by affection, and light- 
ed up with cheerfulness, and industry must be the 
ventilator, renewing the atmosphere, and bringing in 
fresh salubrity day by day ; while over all, as a pro- 
tecting canopy and glory, nothing will suffice except 
the blessings of God. — Rev. Dr. Hamilton. 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



REUNION SONG.— L. M. 



BY JAS. A. SELL. 

Another year has passed away, 
Since we have met to sing and pray; 
' Twas through God's love our lives are : 
And of his goodness all have shared. 
The Lord be praised that we can meet 
And bring our homage at his feet. 
We offer prayer and humble praise 
For his kind care through all our days. 
May this glad day each-soul inspire 
To do its work and mount up higher, 
And rise above all doubts and fears 
And trust the Lord in coming years. 
■ lot is cast where sins abound 



pared 



Our 



confound, 



And fear and doubt our souls 
But we must rise in Jesus' might 
And fight the battles for the right. 
The things which curse our fallen race, 
We'll bravely meet them face to face. 
Our faith and hope will not give way. 
Though long and doubtful is the fray. 
And when the reaper claims his own, 
And in the dust our forms are strewn, 
Let it be said we stood for right 
And braved the foe in thickest fight. 

In circles here are broken ties, 
As one by one pass to the skies, 
Our hearts are sad for those now gone 
And left us in the world alone. 
Their graves to us are sacred mounds 
And keep us where true love abounds. 
We hold their names to memory dear 
And trust the God who meets us here. 
And when reunions here are o'er, 
We'll meet them on the golden shore. 
And death no more shall break our band 
To make sad hearts in that fair land. 
And now, dear Lord, by whose kind hand 
Our friends are kept in every land, 
To thee we lift our hearts in praise, 
And trust thy love through all our days. 
We ask thee now to bless us all 
And make us ready for the call, 
Our souls shall soar to heavenly light. 
So when we pass through death's dark night. 
And when the soul is free from sin, 
And heaven's portals take us in, 
Our broken band will be at home, 
And from each other never roam. 
Hollidaysburg, Pa. 

SCHOOLHOUSE MEETINGS. 



BY WEALTHY A. BUKKHOLDEK. 

Among the pleasant memories of my early life are 
not only happy school days and the scenes connected 
with country schools, but I like to think of the old 
schoolhouses in connection with religious services 
before churchhouses were so numerous as they are 
now. 

Away back in the sixties, in the Aughwick church, 
where I first learned to know and love the Brethren, 
there was only one meetinghouse in the congregation 
—the stone house, in Germany Valley, which still 
stands nestled among the trees, where many scattered 
over the West worshiped in early life. Here there 
was preaching every two weeks. At that time there 
were a great many aged people in the church, but not 
sq many young. I see the picture yet as these old 
brethren and sisters sat along the partitions, or walls, 
where they could get rest for their backs (as at that 
time the seats had no backs). Notwithstanding the 
backless seats, the church attendance everywhere was 
better then than at the present. The old people would 
drive for miles to be at the services. 

Then there were a number of schoolhouses where 



that people would have to sit up on the writing desks, 
which were built along the walls. 

Those meetings were warm and spiritual, and much 
love and sociability were manifested. Possibly in the 
afternoon in the summer there would be services, two 
or three miles in another direction, and a number 
would walk there, so the attendance was always good. 
Dro. John G. Clock was the elder in charge, and 
he was a man who looked carefully after the flock. 
He came from Germany, and preached and sang in 
German. When he would take a text and preach a 
regular sermon he would become so much enthused that 
often the tears would roll down over his face, showing 
the depth of feeling; and I so much wished I could 
understand him. But, though I could not, it was an 
inspiration to watch him and notice the intense interest 
the old people showed who did understand the lan- 
guage. He was not only a Christian in the pulpit, 
but in the community; he was such a kind, loving 
neighbor and friend to everybody that it caused them 
to honor him above many others. 

I had an uncle who lived near him, who was a 
member of the Baptist church, and he and " Papa 
Clock," as he called him, were very intimate friends. 
He said to me once, " Wealthy, if all your people are 
as good as Papa Glock, they will all be sure of heaven." 
Before leaving the valley I visited in their hospitable 
home, which was a home for all, — and I think in those 
days there was more of the true hospitality than now. 
He spoke at length of his early home in Germany and 
of his trip across the deep blue ocean. When he came 
to America he knew nothing of the Brethren church, 
but when he attended a love feast and saw the members 
sitting around the tables he said it looked heavenly, 
and soon after he became a member. He was then 
a young man and when he told me this story his head 
was white with age — not many years before his death. 
He said he felt, after looking back over the dangers 
on the ocean, and over his life, that the hand of God 
led him to America, where he might enjoy Christian 
fellowship with the people whom he so much loved. 
He said he had traveled on horseback much in the 
Brotherhood, but never received but fifty cents, as 
it was a work of love. In those days two brethren 
would travel together and visit the different churches. 
The ministers who did most of the traveling work 
were Brethren Abram Funk, John Spanogle, James 
Lane and C. Myers— strong men in the cause, and men 
who stood high in the community, and whose influence 
still lives, although they have all passed from time to 
eternity. I remember special traits in the lives of each, 
and their church work. Bro. Funk was a neighbor 
to my parents, and we had many opportunities of 
learning of his everyday life and religion. As a neigh- 
bor, he 'was one in the highest and best sense. He 
was careful to visit the sick and administer consola- 
tion ; if there was a death he was on hand to help in 
whatever way was necessary. His home was a home 
for all, and he was careful to keep his surroundings 
homelike. Fie was a lover of the beautiful and fond 
of flowers and all things that added to home life. Fie 
was fond of singing, and loved to listen to others sing. 
Sometimes in services he would cease singing and 
close his eyes. Then in closing the meetings he would 
say that lie did so and had a foretaste of what the 
music of heaven would be. As a preacher he was 
earnest, plain and practical. One of the quotations 
he would often use in prayer was, " They that wait 
upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall 
mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run Md 
not be weary ; and they shall walk and not faint." 

Bro. John Spanogle was considered a good 
preacher and a fine singer, as well as all 
his children. I remember distinctly how fluently 
and eloquently he would quote Scripture- 
David's lament for Absalom, Jesus weeping over 
many other passages that es- 



in his home, as the many can testify who shared his 
hospitality. In early years he was an elder in the 
Presbyterian church, and said he tried to be satisfied 
there until he found he could get nearer the truth. 
Bro. C. Myers was a good preacher, but left the con- 
gregation early in bis ministerial life. Then there 
were often visiting ministers who told the old, old 
Story in the different schoolhouses. I recall Bro. C. 
Long, of Iowa, once I think a minister in the same 
field, and Bro. Enoch Eby, of Illinois, Brethren John 
W. Brumbaugh, PI. B. and Geo. Brumbaugh, John 
Umstead, Grabill Myers, and many more, and by the 
light of the tallow candle, with bare floors and perhaps 
smoked walls, the story of the Gospel was listened to 
with as much interest as it would have been in the 
grand cathedrals, because God has promised to meet 
with his people in all places. 

The ministers who cared for the flock then, and all 
the old brethren and sisters have gone to their long- 
home. Their last song has been sung, the last sermon 
preached and the last prayer made. In the beautiful 
cemetery near the old stone church we will find the 
graves of many of those who worshiped on the back- 
less seats. The old schoolhouses have all been torn 
down and more modern ones erected, but I never pass 
by that I do not remember with feelings of pleasure 
and reverence wdien we gathered in the schoolhouse 
for worship. Comfortable and roomy churches have 
since been built, and others have taken up the work 
and are carrying it forward, ■ Sunday schools and 
missionary meetings, which were not held then, are 
enjoyed now by the young people, and they ought to 
do better work than those who did not have such ad- 
vantages ; but I like to think of the hallowed influence 
of the old people of that time, and of their love anil 
care shown to me, as well as their love manifested to 
each other, which could not be hidden. " For by this 
shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye 
have love one for another." " Let your light so shine 
before men that they may see your good works and 
glorify your Father which is in heaven." 

Among the many oldtime hymns sung in the school- 
house meetings a favorite one was; 

" Guide mc, O thou great Jehovah I 
Pilgrim through this barren land; 
I am weak, but thou art mighty; 
Hold me with thy powerful hand: 
Bread of Heaven I Feed me till I want no more. 
" When I tread the verge of Jordan, 
Bid my anxious fears subside; 
Death of death and hell's destruction, 
Land me safe on Canaan's side; 
Songs of praises I will ever give to theel" 

Neivburg, Pa. 



DID JESUS DISPUTE WITH THE DOCTORS? 



BY W. I. T. HOOVER. 

St. Luke records in the second chapter that when 
Jesus was about twelve years old he with his parents 
went up to Jerusalem to the feast. When the people- 
started home in companies, Jesus' absence was not 
noticed until a day's journey had been made. His 
parents turned back and after three days found him in 
the temple amidst the doctors or teachers of the law. 

The interpretation of this event generally finds ex- 
pression in the statement that Jesus was disputing with 
these teachers. The scene is a favorite one with the 
artists, yet a mere glance at these pictures will show 
that they are not true to circumstances, to customs, 
or to racial characteristics. - But to say he was dis- 
puting is contrary to the very spirit of the biblical 
narrative. 

The account clearly represents him as a learner and 
He increased in wisdom," etc., 
do. 



disputer. 



services were held, perhaps six or eight in the con 

gregation, and these appointments would be due every Jeru^alen^ and^^ ^ 



six or eight weeks. The day would not be forgotten, 
either, notwithstanding so much intervening time. 
The young people then would walk several miles, and 
the Brethren's children who were not members seemed 
to feel their presence was needed, and they would help 
with the singing, and seemed to be a part of the ser- 
vice. The schoolhouses would often be so crowded 



preacher. He seldom preached in those days that he 
did not shed tears. I had the pleasure of hearing him 
make an exhortation five years ago, a year or two 
before his death, and I thought he was as eloquent as 
tZ l^l^:V^%^^^ Z&T*** - r ereuce those legal, appointed 



not as 

shows his human side needed to learn as 
Hence we find him availing himself of every oppor- 
tunity to increase his knowledge, and no doubt he 
counted it a rare privilege to come under the tutelage 
of these eminent teachers of the Jewish law and 
polity. Certainly in Jesus' boyhood he dtd not an- 
eminent expounders of the law, for 



tagonize these 

not only the above reason. 



but because in later life he 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



ESSAYS 



"Slutly lo show thyself approve unto God, a workman that needeth not 
be ashamed, rightly dividing the Word of Truth." 



A NEW YEAR'S HYMN. 



Break, new-born year, on glad eyes break- 
Melodious voices move! 

On, rolling Time! thou canst not make 
The Father cease to love. 

The parted year had winged feet; 

The Savior still doth stay: 
The New Year comes; but Spirit sweet, 

Thou goest not away. 

Our hearts in tears may oft run o'er; 

But, Lord, thy smile still beams; 
Our sins are swelling evermore; 

But pardoning grace still streams. 

Lord! from this year more service win, 

More glory, more delight! 
O make its hours less sad with sin! 

Its days with thee more bright! 

Then we may bless its precious things 
If earthly cheer should come, 

Or gladsome mount on angel wings 
If thou shouldst take us home. 

— Thomas H. 



Gill 



A FRAGMENTARY SUPPLEMENT TO THE LIFE 

AND LABORS OF ELD. JOHN KLINE, AND 

OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST AT THE 

CONFERENCE OF 1864. 



BY L. W. TEETEU. 

I was much interested in reading the " Lite of Eld. 
John Kline," in various ways. But I was disappointed 
in finding so brief an account of the Conference of 1864 
which proved to be his last. I felt then that, since this 
was his last attendance at Conference, and so shortly 
before his death, more should be written of his life 
and work there. Having a clear recollection of that 
Conference, I venture to give a brief account of his 
work, influence, etc. 

Likely, on account of the prominent part he per- 
formed at this Conference, his modesty forbade mak- 
\ ing extensive notes. On this account the editor of 
\the book had no resources to draw from. Hence 
neither he nor the editor are to blame for the omission. 
What I shall write, properly belongs to notes of May 
13-1P, 1864, beginning on page 473 of " Life of John 
Kline." What I know of Eld. John Kline previous 
to this Conference was by reputation. But here I 
had a good opportunity to consider him for about 
six days. His saintly deportment, refined address, 
and his natural force of character were such that they 
could be felt when in his presence, especially by a 
young man in his nineteenth year. I can remember 
his venerable countenance, kindly, loving disposition, 
deep humility, with much firmness, however. He was 
a well-formed man, of good size, modestly dressed in 
an out-and-out blue jeans suit made strictly plain and 
well-fitting. 

Still more interest is associated with the reading 
of this book by all yet living in this locality who can 
call to mind the saddest of the events that occurred in 
the month of May, 1864. 

It was here, in the Nettle Creek congregation, a 
mile west of Hagerstown, near our large brick church, 
where Eld. John Kline was in attendance at the last 
Annual Meeting he ever attended, of which he was 
chosen and acted as its moderator. He arrived here 
at Hagerstown on Friday, May 13, and left on May 
19. Then, in just one month from the time of this 
Annual Meeting, he was martyred. This was in the 
heat of the great civil war. Patriotic blood was at 
a high temperature; and language is too feeble to 
express the excitement in this community when the 
sad news of his tragic death reached the ears of the 
people. 

The largest attendance at this Annual Meeting was 
estimated at fifteen thousand. Naturally, a very large 
percentage of this multitude resided in this community 
and had become somewhat familiar with its presiding 
officer. Many were the expressions of sympathy, and 
all felt that a great and good man had passed to his 
reward among the blessed. 

Immediately after the close of this Conference, he 



visited some of his old Virginia friends in an adjoining 
church to Nettle Creek, where he preached one of 
his last sermons in these parts, at the close of which 
he uttered a very touching benediction of Paul, ap- 
plying it to himself, which proved a positive forecast 
of — and, in a peaceful, resigned soul, a preiude to his 
. eventful demise, in these words ; " Now, brethren and 
friends, I have only touched some of the chords in the 
beautiful anthem of my theme. I now leave it with 
you, hoping that you may learn every note in it; and 
by the sweet music of a good life delight the ears 
and warm the hearts of all who hear its rich har- 
monies. Possibly you may never see my face or hear 
my voice again. I am now on my way back to Vir- 
ginia, not knowing the things that shall befall me 
there. It may be that bonds and afflictions abide me. 
But I feel that I have done nothing worthy of bonds 
or of death ; and none of these things move me ; neither 
count I my life dear unto myself, so that I may finish 
my course with joy, and the ministry which I have 
received of the Lord Jesus, to testify the Gospel of 
the grace of God," Only twenty-seven days later he 
fell asleep in Jesus. " Blessed sleep ! " 

It is strengthening to the soul to entertain in fond 
memory the mob-martyrdom of a Stephen, and the 
capital execution of a Paul, — for nothing worse than 
preaching, and living, a soul-saving GospeU Although 
we have not seen them with our natural eyes, yet as 
we think of them, and of their sweet spirits and last 
words, our hearts become filled to overflowing with 
sympathy for them, because they so bravely and 
heroically maintained their Christian honor into their 
very death. 

But Eld. John Kline many of us have seen with 
our own eyes. He was an evangelist, truly a modern 
apostle of God, who gave no uncertain sound of the 
Gospel of Jesus Christ. May we not truly say of him 
that he was a martyr for the truth as it is in Jesus, 
as really as Stephen and Paul ? Yes ; and of him it 
may be truly said, as of the first martyr, Abel, " He 
being dead yet speaketh." Heb. 11:4. 

At the time of this Conference I was not yet a 
member of the church. But I was much interested in 
the discussions, which were conducted mostly in a 
beautiful grove near by the old brick church. I 
recollect distinctly the appearance of some of the more 
prominent ministers, among whom were James Quinter 
and Henry Kurtz, who were then editors and pub- 
lishers of the Gospel Visitor, a monthly publication, 
which was the only church paper or journal published 
in .behalf of the Brethren church at that time. Eld. 
D. P. Sayler was also here, and at his best, and proved 
himself a most forceful speaker. His words, like 
arrows, reached their destination. Among the rest 
was a brilliant coming giant mind in the person of the 
late Eld. R. H. Miller, then about thirty-six, who was 
not forward, but a great observer, fitting himself for 
future church work. 

At this Conference the Standing Committee con- 
sisted of only fourteen members, — only about one- 
third the number of Standing Committees of recent 
years. 

Associated with the work of this Conference, I 
name a few other items. It was here during this 
Conference that H. R. FJolsinger solicited trial sub- 
scriptions for a weekly religious paper to be devoted 
to church work in general. He succeeded in securing 
enough subscriptions to begin its publication. It 
proved to be a neat little paper of sixteen pages, about 
half the size of the present Gospel Messenger. My 
father was one of those original subscribers, and for 
a number of years the paper was a weekly and wel- 
come visitor in our home, being published at Tyrone, 
Pa., under name of Christian Family Companion. It 
was in this paper that our renowned essayist, C. H. 
Balsbaugh, with his complete, rounded-out mental 
vocabulary, came into prominence before me. 

It was also at this Conference that W. C. Thurman 
came to the fore, with several of his productions, chief 
among which was his book entitled "The Sealed 
Book of 'Daniel Opened." The burden of the work 
was the solution of the problem of the exact time 
of Christ's second coming. He was a fine-looking 
man of splendid address, smooth-tongued, and 



attracted much attention. Almost every night during 
the Conference he preached in the neighboring barns 
where he had large audiences to listen to his doctrine. 
I was one who followed him several of those evenings 
to hear him demonstrate. At one of those meetings' 
an aged brother followed him, and said, substantially, 
that it was not so important to know when Christ 
would come the second time as it was to be always 
ready for his coming. 
Hagfrstown, Ind. 



ELDER JOHN METZGER AT OUR MEETING 
IN 1859. 



BY JOHN CALVIN BRIGHT. 

In 185'J the Bear Creek church rebuilt her meeting- 
house six miles west of Dayton, Ohio. Through the 
summer the meetings were held in the houses and 
barns of the members of the church. After what 
seemed to me, a boy of eight summers, a long time, 
the meeting came to our place. The spacious barn 
floor and mows were all arranged for the gathering. 
Our good mother, with the assistance of the kind 
neighbors, baked and cooked to feed all who would 
stay for dinner. 

It was an ideal summer day. And it seemed to me 
as though nearly everybody was there. And the 
report widely spread that Eld. Johnny Metzger was 
to preach had no little influence in swelling the crowd 
to unusual proportions. To my boyhood standpoint 
it was the culminating point in history. 

At a suitable hour, Brother Metzger came and 
received a glad welcome from my father and the 
older ministers. I never saw a nicer man, unless it 
was my father. His face fairly beamed with kindness, 
love and life. His raven locks hung down on his 
collar; his every action full of enthusiasm, and his 
words of the sweetest intonation and accent. I left 
my boy comrades to get closer to him. He noticed 
even little me and gave me the kindest " howdy " and 
said to my father, " Johnnie may be a preacher some 
day, too." I never had received such kind attentions 
from any one, and I lingered near the preachers, and 
when they started for the barn I followed along, 
feeling that I was almost if not altogether a son of 
a prophet. 

On the way to the barn my father asked Bro. 
Metzger to preach English as most of his neighbors 
could not understand German. Some of the older 
ministers asked him to preach German, as that was 
the language in which most of the services were con- 
ducted at Bear Creek at that time. 

After the somewhat extended introductory exer- 
cises, Brother Metzger took the floor and excusing 
himself to the German Brethren he spoke in English 
with great power and earnestness on the Vine and 
Branches. Every one was interested by his earnest 
entreaties and exhortations. The rafters fairly rang 
with the echoes of his musical voice. One remark 
was indelibly impressed on my memory. Referring 
to the tendrils which held the branches to the vine and 
arbor he said they represent our affections which hold 
us to Christ and the church ; but too often they 
represent our affections so closely wrapped around 
our purse that we cannot open it to give to the Lord 
his dues. 

I always think of this when I find myself slow in 
giving financially to the Lord's cause, and the same 
truth looms up before me wdten I see or hear of others 
who experience the same difficulty. 

Everybody said it was the best sermon they ever 
heard. I have never got away from the inspiration 
of that occasion, and I pray I never may until I realize 
its full import in clasping our departed brother in 
the climes of immortal youth and everlasting joy. 
Dayton, Ohio. 

■ m i 

Six things are requisite to create a happy home. 
Integrity must be the architect, and tidiness the up- 
holsterer. It must be wanned by affection, and light- 
ed up with cheerfulness, and industry must be the 
ventilator, renewing the atmosphere, and bringing in 
fresh salubrity day by day ; while over all, as a pro- 
tecting canopy and glory, nothing will suffice except 
the blessings of God. — Rev. Dr. Hamilton. 



k£~?f.l*.3*W**l 



r*'j*t.zwr*r.i 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 6, 190?. 



REUNION SONG.— L. M. 



BY J AS. A. SELL. 

Another year has passed away, 
Since we have met to sing and pray; 
'Twas through God's love our lives are spared 
And of his goodness all have shared. 

The Lord be praised that we can meet 
And bring our homage at his feet. 
We offer prayer and humble praise 
For his kind care through all our days. 

May this glad day each soul inspire 
To do its work and mount up higher. 
And rise above all doubts and fears 
And trust the Lord in coining years. 

Our lot is cast where sins abound 
And fear and doubt our souls confound, 
But we must rise in Jesus' might 
And fight the battles for the right. 

The things which curse our fallen race, 
We'll bravely meet them face to face. 
Our faith and hope will not give way, 
Though long and doubtful is the fray. 

And when the reaper claims his own, 
And in the dust our forms are strewn, 
Let it be said we stood for right 
And braved the foe in thickest fight. 

In circles here are broken ties, 
As one by one pass to the skies, 
Our hearts are sad for those now gone 
And left us in the world alone. 

Their graves to us are sacred mounds 
And keep us where true love abounds. 
We hold their names to memory dear 
And trust the God who meets us here. 
And when reunions here are o'er, 
We'll meet them on the golden shore, 
And death no more shall break our band 
To make sad hearts in that fair land. 

And now, dear Lord, by whose kind hand 
Our friends are kept in every land, 
To thee we lift our hearts in praise, 
And trust thy love through all our days. 

We ask thee now to bless us all 

And make us ready for the call, 

Our souls shall soar to heavenly light. 

So when we pass through death's dark night. 

And when the soul is free from sin, 
And heaven's portals take us in, 
Our broken band will be at home, 
And from each other never roam. 
Mollidaysburg, Pa. 



SCHOOLHOUSE MEETINGS. 



BY WEALTHY A. BUKKHOLDER. 

Among the pleasant memories of my early life are 
not only happy school days and the scenes connected 
with country schools, but I like to think of the old 
schoolhouses in connection with religious services 
before churchhouses were so numerous as they are 
now. 

Away back in the sixties, in the Aughwick church, 
where I first learned to know and love the Brethren, 
there was only one meetinghouse in the congregation 
—the stone house, in Germany Valley, which still 
stands nestled among the trees, where many scattered 
over the West worshiped in early life. Here there 
was preaching every two weeks. At that time there 
were a great many aged people in the church, but not 
sq many young. I see the picture yet as these old 
brethren and sisters sat along the partitions, or walls, 
where they could get rest for their backs (as at that 
time the seats had no backs). Notwithstanding the 
backless seats, the church attendance everywhere was 
better then than at the present. The old people would 
drive for miles to be at the services. 

I hen there were a number of schoolhouses where 
services were held, perhaps six or eight in the con- 
gregation, and these appointments would be due every 
six or eight weeks. The day would not be forgotten, 
either, notwithstanding so much intervening time. 
1 he young people then would walk several miles, and 
the Brethren's children who were not members seemed 
to feel their presence was needed, and they would help 
with the singing, and seemed to be a part of the ser- 
vice. The schoolhouses would often be so crowded 



that people would have to sit up on the writing desks, 
which were built along the walls. 

Those meetings were warm and spiritual, and much 
love and sociability were manifested. Possibly in the 
afternoon in the summer there would be services, two 
or three miles in another direction, and a number 
would walk there, so the attendance was always good. 
Bro. John G. Clock was the elder in charge, and 
he was a man who looked carefully after the flock. 
He came, from Germany, and preached and sang in 
German. When he would take a text and preach a 
regular sermon he would become so much enthused that 
often the tears would roll down over his face, showing 
the depth of feeling; and I so much wished I could 
understand him. But, though I could not, it was an 
inspiration to watch him and notice the intense interest 
the old people showed who did understand the lan- 
guage. He was not only a Christian in the pulpit, 
but in the community ; he was such a kind, loving 
neighbor and friend to everybody that it caused them 
to honor him above many others. 

I had an uncle who lived near him, who was a 
member of the Baptist church, and he and " Papa 
Clock," as he called him, were very intimate friends. 
He said to me once, " Wealthy, if all your people are 
as good as Papa Clock, they will all be sure of heaven." 
Before leaving the valley I visited in their hospitable 
home, which was a home for all, — and I think in those 
days there was more of the true hospitality than now. 
He spoke at length of his early home in Germany and 
of his trip across the deep blue ocean. When he came 
to America he knew nothing of the Brethren church, 
but when he attended a love feast and saw the members 
sitting around the tables he said it looked heavenly, 
and soon after he became a member. He was then 
a young man and when he told me this story his head 
was white with age — not many years before his death. 
He said he felt, after looking back over the dangers 
on the ocean, and over his life, that the hand of God 
led him to America, where he might enjoy Christian 
fellowship with the people whom he so much loved. 
He said he had traveled on horseback much in the 
Brotherhood, but never received but fifty cents, as 
it was a work of love. In those days two brethren 
would travel together and visit the different churches. 
The ministers who did most of the traveling work 
were Brethren Abram Funk, John Spanogle, James 
Lane and C. Myers — strong men in the cause, and men 
who stood high in the community, and whose influence 
still lives, although they have all passed from time to 
eternity. I remember special traits in the lives of each, 
and their church work. Bro. Funk was a neighbor 
to my parents, and we had many opportunities of 
learning of his everyday life and religion. As a neigh- 
bor, he 'was one in the highest and best sense. He 
was careful to visit the sick and administer consola- 
tion; if there was a death he was on hand to help in 
whatever way was necessary. His home was a home 
for all, and he was careful to keep his surroundings 
homelike. He was a lover of the beautiful and fond 
of flowers and all things that added to home life. He 
was fond of singing, and loved to listen to others sing. 
Sometimes in services he would cease singing and 
close his eyes. Then in closing the meetings he would 
say that he did so and had a foretaste of what the 
music of heaven would be. As a preacher he was 
earnest, plain and practical. One of the quotations 
he would often use in prayer was, " They that wait 
upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall 
mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run and 
not be weary; and they shall walk and not faint." 

Bro. John Spanogle was considered a good 
preacher and a fine singer, as well as all 
his children. I remember distinctly how fluently 
and eloquently he would quote Scripture — 
David's lament for Absalom, Jesus weeping over 
Jerusalem, and many other passages that es- 
pecially impressed him. Bro. Lane was the weeping 
preacher. He seldom preached in those days that he 
did not shed tears. I had the pleasure of hearing him 
make an exhortation five years ago, a year or two 
before his death, and I thought he was as eloquent as 
when I heard him and lived under his ministry forty 
years ago. Bro. Lane, too, was very kind and sociable 



in his home, as the many can testify who shared his 
hospitality. In early years he was an elder in the 
Presbyterian church, and said he tried to be satisfied 
there until he found he could get nearer the truth. 
Bro. C. Myers was a good preacher, but left the con- 
gregation early in his ministerial life. Then there 
were often visiting ministers who told the old, old 
Story in the different schoolhouses. I recall Bro. C. 
Long, of Iowa, once I think a minister in the same 
field, and Bro. Enoch Eby, of Illinois, Brethren John 
W. Brumbaugh, H. B. and Geo. Brumbaugh, John 
Umstead, Grabill Myers, and many more, and by the 
light of the tallow candle, with bare floors and perhaps 
smoked walls, the story of the Gospel was listened to 
with as much interest as it would have been in the 
grand cathedrals, because God has promised to meet 
with his people in all places. 

The ministers who cared for the flock then, and all 
the old brethren and sisters have gone to their long- 
home. Their last song has been sung, the last sermon 
preached and the last prayer made. In the beautiful 
cemetery near the old stone church we will find the 
graves of many of those who worshiped on the back- 
less seats. The old schoolhouses have all been torn 
down and more modern ones erected, but I never pass 
by that I do not remember with feelings of pleasure 
and reverence when we gathered in the schoolhouse 
for worship. Comfortable and roomy churches have 
since been built, and others have taken up the work 
and are carrying it forward. . Sunday schools and 
missionary meetings, which were not held then, are 
enjoyed now by the young people, and they ought to 
do better work than those who did not have such ad- 
vantages; but I like to think of the hallowed influence 
of the old people of that time, and of their love and 
care shown to me, as well as their love manifested to 
each other, which could not be hidden. " For by this 
shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye 
have love one for another." " Let your light so shine 
before men that they may see your good works and 
glorify your Father which is in heaven." 

Among the many oldtime hymns sung in the school- 
house meetings a favorite one was : 

" Guide me, O thou great Jehovah! 
Pilgrim through this barren land; 
I am weak, but thou art mighty; 
Hold me with thy powerful hand: 
Bread of Heaven! Feed me till I want no more. 
" When I tread the verge of Jordan, 
Bid my anxious fears subside; 
Death of death and hell's destruction, 
Land me safe on Canaan's side; 
Songs of praises I will ever give to thee! " 

Newbitrg, Pa. 



DID JESUS DISPUTE WITH THE DOCTORS? 



BY W. I. T. HOOVER. 

St. Luke records in the second chapter that when 
Jesus was about twelve years old he with his parents 
went up to Jerusalem to the feast. When the people 
started home in companies, Jesus' absence was not 
notice.d until a day's journey had been made. His 
parents turned back and after three days found him in 
the temple amidst the doctors or teachers of the law. 

The interpretation of this event generally finds ex- 
pression in the statement that Jesus was disputing with 
these teachers. The scene is a favorite one with the 
artists, yet a mere glance at these pictures will show 
that they are not true to circumstances, to customs, 
or to racial characteristics. • But to say he was dis- 
puting is contrary to the very spirit of the' biblical 
narrative. 

Tlie account clearly represents him as a learner and 
not as a disputer. " He increased in wisdom," etc., 
shows his human side needed to learn as we do. 
Hence we find him availing himself of every oppor- 
tunity to increase his knowledge, and no doubt he 
counted it a rare privilege to come under the tutelage 
of these eminent teachers of the Jewish law and 
polity. Certainly in Jesus' boyhood he did not an- 
tagonize these eminent expounders of the law, for 
not only the above reason, but because in later life he 
taught his disciples to reverence those legally appointed 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



authorities of the people when he said, " The scribes 
and Pharisees sit in Moses' seat; all therefore what- 
soever they bid you observe, that observe and do." 

Jesus* method was the very opposite of the Greeks, 
tor they set forth questions and schemes of philosophy 
and invited to disputation. These Jewish teachers 
were regarded as divinely commissioned to teach. 
They were to expound God's decrees. Promiscuous 
discussions were not permitted. Hence it is very 
improbable that Jesus disputed with these doctors of 
the law. 

Again, Jesus would surely not violate all the re- 
ceived maxims of propriety. About twenty years 
later he did array himself against their intensely literal 
interpretations of human traditions, etc., but at the age 
of twelve he could not be said to have done so. 

Then, too, these were men of age and experience, 
and we feel like reverencing old age, though we may 
greatly differ in opinions. We somehow respect 
such because we think they are nearing their journey's 
end from which many shrink, though at the same time 
earnestly desiring to know its secrets. Was Jesus less 
courteous than we toward the aged and legally ap- 
pointed religious body? 

Yet one more reason leads us to think Jesus did not 
dispute with these men. Luke 2:47, "And all that 
heard him were amazed at his understanding and his 
answers." Hence his answers to their questions and 
not his questions showed a richness of intelligence 
not common among Jewish boys of his tender years. 
Therefore we conclude that the title so commonly 
given to this brief narrative or to pictures representing 
it carries a grave error on its face. 

Bridgwater, Va. 



'FEED MY LAMBS." 



BY JOHN W. WAYLAND. 

St. Peter, himself an elder, said to the elders, 
"Feed the flock of God." St. Paul, another elder," 
said to the elders, " Feed the church of God." Christ 
Jesus, the great Good Shepherd of all the sheep, said 
to St. Peter, " Feed my lambs." 

Christ reinforced his statement to Peter by putting 
it in a threefold form, with significant variations. 
First he said, " Boske ta arnia mou " — " Feed my 
lambs." The second time he said, " Poimeane ta 
probata mou " — " Be a shepherd to my sheep." The 
third time he said, " Boske ta probata mou " — " Feed 
my sheep." According to another reading, which is 
probably the correct one, we have the word probatia 
for probata; then the charges, translated literally, 
stand as follows : " Feed my lamHs " ; " Be a shepherd 
to my little sheep " ; " Feed my little sheep." 

The Master wanted to be sure of Peter's love, first 
of all ; then he said, " Feed my lambs." The true 
shepherd loves the Chief Shepherd and the flock ; the 
true flock loves the true shepherd and the Chief Shep- 
herd. But the shepherd's chief business is not to love 
the flock, but to feed it. Rather, he is first examined 
upon the question of love, in order that it may be 
ascertained whether it is safe to put the flock in his 
charge; for if he love not the flock he will be as like 
to rob it as to feed it. 

But Christ seemed especially concerned about the 
lambs. So ought we to be. Who are the lambs ? 
They are the youngest in the fold. Aged men and 
women may be babes in Christ — lambs in the fold ; 
but the boys and girls that are just entering the fold 
are the lambs in a double sense : they, truly, are the 
Master's " little sheep." And the Master wants them 
nourished; he wants them fed. 

Food is essential to life. Food is essential to growth. 
Properly administered, it produces development and 
strength. Christ wants the lambs to live; he wants 
them to grow and develop; he wants them to become 
strong. He is specially concerned about the lambs ; 
for he knows that they need most help : he knows that 
they need most guidance: he knows that they need 
most food, and need it most frequently. The older 
ones of the flock have learned many of the ways lead- 
ing to the green pastures ; they know the power and 
comfort of the living waters ; but the paths are new 



to the youngest feet ; and other waters, not yet known 
to be deadly, linger sweet upon the tongue. Christ 
says, " Feed my lambs." The wolves find it easiest 
to seize the weakest of the flock, and the eagles to 
bear them away. Christ says, " Be a shepherd to my 
little sheep." A shepherd is to teach and guide, as 
well as protect and feed. Really, while doing the one 
thing he does the others also. When he teaches the 
lambs the right paths,— and pastors should be " apt 
to teach." — he is leading them to food and drink ; he 
is also keeping them in a safe place — away from 
precipices and dens of beasts. Sometimes the shep- 
herd must use the crook of correction; but not often, 
if the feeding and leading are properly done. In 
fact, Christ says nothing at all in this connection about 
correction and discipline: it is the feeding of the flock 
that he is most concerned about. He knows that the 
way to break the sheep of harm's way is to lead them 
in his way, and feed them there ; that the best way to 
keep them from straying off is to give them plenty to 
eat ; that the way to keep them out of the jaws of 
wolves and the claws of eagles is to develop their 
strength in green pastures and by clear waters; that 
the way to keep them from disease is to keep them 
clean and warm : in short, he knew that prevention is 
better than cure ; and he is proceeding on that prin-' 
ciple. As some one in modern legal phrase has put 
it, " It is wiser and less expensive to save children 
than to punish criminals." Translated into pastoral 
language, this would be: It is wiser and more profitable 
to care for the lambs and keep them healthy than it 
is to doctor sick sheep. All this is comprehended in 
our Lord's charge: "Feed my lambs; be a shepherd 
to my little sheep." 

Christ knew that one good pastor — shepherd, 
bishop, elder — with the love and confidence and 
acquaintance of his flock, working daily in their homes 
and hearts, can prevent more disease and mischief, 
especially among the young members of the church, 
than a whole congregation in council once a quarter 
can cure. It is pastors— lamb-shepherds — that the 
church needs : it is pastors — feeders and leaders of 
the little sheep — that the church must have. And the 
Brethren church needs them most of all, because it 
has so few. It is this one thing that is our greatest 
need to-day. How soon will each elder in the church 
realize this? And how soon will each congregation 
realize it? The elder ought to lead in this as in all 
other church business ; but he cannot do the thing 
alone. The elder does not want to push himself for- 
ward; for he is human and so are his flock; but as 
soon as a congregation says to its elder, " We need 
you, and Christ needs you, to feed the lambs and the 
sheep ; we want you to quit business and attend to 
the church's greatest need, and we are going to make 
it possible for you to do this thing," I dare say, the 
elder will be ready and glad to respond. Christ said: 
" The laborer is worthy of his hire " ; but he did not 
say it while the twelve were giving most of their time 
to fishing. The man who gives only one-seventh of 
his time to the church cannot expect to live- of the 
church; and the church will certainly not get very 
much life from him ; neither can any congregation 
demand of its elder's time without making it possible 
for him to give it. Christ says to the church, " The 
laborer is worthy of his hire"; he says to the elder, 
" Feed my lambs." Thus the whole matter is adjusted, 
and the church's great need is met. But it requires 
a united response ; it takes the whole church to answer ; 
and until there comes this united response of elder and 
laity in unison, Christ's burning question, " Lovest 
thou me?" will be unanswered, and Christ's lambs 
— his little sheep — will continue to stray into forbidden 
paths and to die for the want of food. 

University of Virginia. 



NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SEVEN. 



BY J. KURTZ MILLER. 

New Year's Day gives us an opportunity to re- 
view the past, to reflect upon the present, and to 
resolve for the future. 

Improvement along any line is not by chance. It 



comes by earnest resolve and hard work. 1907 will 
be just what we make it. If we will it may be — 

"A year divine, 
Transfigured from above, 
With all its days like heaven's heights, 
Filled with God's light and love." 

The happiness of looking back upon a good year 
largely depends on whether we have — 
I. Surrendered Completely. 

If you have any bad habits, drop them; any evil 
associations, leave them ; any enemies, forgive them. 
Are there such things which you cannot drop, or 
leave or forgive, ask help of God and believe that he 
is only too willing to give you victory. Having sur- 
rendered the evil and turned from it, give God your 
best. Let him have your time to dispose of as he sees 
best. He needs your lips, to speak just the right 
word. He needs your hands to help the needy cause. 
He needs your heart to love the erring into the way 
of life. He needs his " tenth "—which of course we 
never (?) withhold — to spread the "good news" of 
salvation. 

II. Trust Lovingly. 

We cannot stagger at any promise of the Lord, 
when " love for God " fills our hearts. Much of our 
trouble and failure is because of a lack of love and 
trust in our God. " When we worry, we do not trust, 
and when we trust we do not worry." The measure 
of our trust is the measure of our proving the promises 
of God in the hard places of life. 

Turn in your Bible to the fifteenth chapter of John, 
and notice the " abiding trust " Jesus had in the 
Father. Underscore the seven " abides," and the six- 
teen uses of the possessive pronoun " My." Read, 
and reread, until you feel some of the nearness of the 
Father that Jesus felt when he said, " My Father." 
Notice the expressions " my joy," " my friends," " my 
name's sake." It is a hard heart that cannot be won 
into "loving trustfulness," after a prayerful study of 
the "life of our Lord." 

III. Obey Faithfully. 
A French soldier is quoted as having said, " If 
Napoleon had bid his soldiers march to the moon, 
they would have started." To say the least this shows 
the spirit of obedience. Napoleon was a great man, 
but was finally defeated and died in exile. But our 
Lord Jesus Christ knows no defeat! He has con- 
quered death and the grave! Shall our obedience to 
him be anything less than the most faithful obedience? 
We are not surprised to see the zig-zag life of some, 
when we behold how lightly they regard their bap- 
tismal vow. And need we be surprised that trouble 
and disappointments roll in upon some who have made 
still more solemn vows to God and the church, and 
obey not? Is it faithful obedience, when one is in- 
stalled in the sacred office of the ministry and promises 
to conform to the order of the Brotherhood in all 
things, even to the parting of the hair, and then 
because of the tastes of a wife, obeys her in preference 
to the promises made before God to the church ? May 
this year 1907 bring us closer to the Lord. May our 
obedience be as unto him and not the carnal mind. 

IV. Submit Cheerfully. 

1907 will be " the year of our Lord," if we allow 
him to live with us, teach us, and guide our life. It 
is our year, and not the Lord's, when we are not 
submissive to him. May this prayer of submission be 
ours : 

" Lord, I would not have a hand to guide, but thine; 
For thou hast trod where sinners stray 
And knowest well life's troubled way, and mine. 

" lord, I would not have a hand to rule, but thine, 
For thou art wise as thou art good 
And none can better choose what should be mine, 

" Lord, help me to tread the sorest path, for thee, 
For thou canst make the roughest plain 
Give joy for grief and calm the pain, for me." 

V. Pray Confidentially. 

Speak to the Lord as you would to your dearest 
friend about every detail of your life. Make your 
secret prayer a time of sweet communion. He has 
promised to reward thee openly. Thou nor thy wife 
needest not publish thy secret praying. It will mani- 
fest itself in kind words, loving sacrifice, a forgiving 
spirit, returning good for evil, a real live interest in 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



the work of tlie church. We will never complain that 
we have much to do.- but rather seel; opportunity to 
,|o more. 

" What shall I ask for the coming year? 
What shall my watchword be? 
What wouldst thou do for me, dear Lord? 
What can I do for thee? 

" Lord, I ask for a holy year. 
Thy faith and love divine; 
Taking my full inheritance, 
Making thy fullness mine. 

" Lord, I ask for the dying world. 
Stretch forth thy mighty hand, 
Thy truth proclaim, thy power display 
This year in every land." 
5901 3rd Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



BAPTISM OF THE HOLY SPIRIT. 



DV E. L. CARTER. 

Is sanctifieation merely consecration? We con- 
secrate ourselves to God's service. So if consecration 
is sanctifieation we sanctify ourselves. Is man able 
to do that? If he is, then why can he not save him- 
self? We have to go to God for regeneration. When 
we are regenerated we are born into the kingdom of 
God and are God's children until we sin; and when we 
commit the first sin, we cease to be children of God, 
for " Whosoever is born of God doth not commit sin." 
1 John 3:9. " He that committeth sin is of the devil." 
1 John 3 : 8. 

Does regeneration take the tendency to sin out of 
us? Paul says in Romans 7:19-25, "For the good 
that I would, / do not; but the evil which I would 
not, that I do. Now if I do that I would not, it is 
no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me." 
(Not sins but sin, singular number, sin.) "For I 
delight in the law of God after the inward man ; but 
I see another law in my members, warring against the 
law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to 
the law of sin which is in my members " (causing me 
to sin). "O wretched man that I am! who shall 
deliver me from the body of this death ? I thank God 
through Jesus Christ our Lord." That then is the 
remedy. It is evident that Paul was speaking to 
regenerated people, using his own experience to il- 
lustrate his meaning. Their sins were forgiven, but 
they still had inbred sin, or sin in the flesh. Rom. 
6:12. "Let not sin reign in your mortal body, that 
ye should obey it in the lusts thereof." 

What does Paul mean by asking the disciples, 
" Have ye received the Holy Ghost since ye believed ? " 
Acts 19 : 2. The Word says they were certain 
disciples; they believed and had been baptized unto 
John's baptism. Acts 19 : 3. What was John's 
baptism? Mark 1:4. "John did baptize in the 
wilderness, and preach the baptism of repentance for 
the remission of sins." So you see they believed, had 
repented, were baptized and were disciples, but had 
not received the Holy Ghost; for they told Paul so. 
Matt. 3:11. John says: " I indeed baptize you with 
water unto repentance, but one cometh after me who 
will baptize you with the Holy Ghost and fire." 

What is the baptism of the Holy Ghost for? It 
undoubtedly is for believers, and they do not get it 
when regenerated, for these disciples had not received 
it at regeneration. It must take out that tendency to 
sin and make us every whit whole. If not, what does 
he do? Now we know by our own experiences that 
there is a something in us that causes us to sin, yet 
we do not want to sin. John 1 : 29, " John seeth 
Jesus coming unto him, and sayeth, Behold the Lamb 
of God, which taketh away the sin of the world'." 
(Sin, singular number. ) Is he able? The Word says 
so. But does the reader believe he will do it? " Let 
not sin reign in your mortal body." " Sin not." " Be 
ye perfect." " Be ye holy." Now can we be pure, holy, 
and perfect with inbred sin in our heart,, that we in- 
herited from Adam, causing us to sin when we do 
not want to ? See Rom. 7 : 19, " For the good that I 
would, I do not : but the evil which I would not, that 

.*> It is no more I that do it, but 

sm that dwelleth in me." We are not responsible for 
having inbred sin, but responsible for keeping it, when 
Christ came to "take away the sin of the world." 



Have we, as a church, forgotten Pentecost? Do we 
really know the meaning of the baptism of the Holy 
Spirit? Now is a sinless life attainable? It must 
be, or God would not have commanded such. Matt. 
5 : 48, " Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father 
which is in heaven is perfect." 1 Peter 1:16, "Be- 
cause it is written, Be ye holy ; for I am holy." Eph. 
1:4. Gal. 5 : 16, " This I say then, Walk in the Spirit, 
and ye shall not fulfill the lust of the flesh." Gal. 5 : 24, 
" And they that are Christ's have crucified the flesh 
with the affections and lusts." Gal. 5 : 25, " If we live 
in the Spirit, let us also walk in the Spirit." Eph. 
4:24, "That ye put on the new man which after 
God is created in righteousness and true holiness." 
It is taught in prayer. Psalm 10:51. John 17:17, 
" Sanctify them through thy truth : thy word is truth." 
Now observe, Christ is praying for those that the 
Father has given him. Read the entire chapter and 
see for yourself. 1 Thess. 5 : 23, " And the very God 
of peace sanctify you wholly; and I pray God your 
whole spirit and soul and body be preserved blameless 
unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ." Heb. 
13:20, 21. "It lias been experienced." Isa. 6:5-7, 
" And thine iniquity is taken away, and thy sin 
purged" (not sins, but sin). Rom. 6:6-22. Rev. 
14:5, "It is obtained by faith." Acts 15:9, "And 
put no difference between us and them, purifying their 
hearts by faith." Heb. 10: 14. " For by one offering 
he hath perfected forever them that are sanctified." 
Heb. 10: 18, " Now where remission of these is, there 
is no more offering for sin." Heb. 10: 19, " Having 
therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holiest 
by the blood of Jesus." What does the " holiest " here 
mean? Nothing more or less than sanctifieation 
entered into by the baptism of the Holy Spirit, which 
is obtained by faith in the blood of Jesus Christ to 
cleanse from all unrighteousness." Know ye not that 
so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were 
baptized into his death ? " " Therefore we are buried, 
with him by baptism into death." This means the 
baptism of the Holy Spirit, not water baptism, which 
symbolises the baptism of the Holv Spirit. Tust as 
Christ died on the cross, so we die to sin in this 
baptism. 

Little River. Kans. 



CORRESPONDENCE 



Write what thou seest, and ; 



it 1111 to the churches,' 



FROM BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



With the opening of the new year our hearts are glad- 
dened in more ways than one. The Lord is adding to 
our number "such as should be saved." The young man 
from India, of whom mention was made in my former 
notes, was among the number baptized. His heathen 
name is Ranjit Singh, but at our suggestion he adds the 
Christian name of "James." Therefore he shall hereafter 
be known as James Ranjit Singh. He expects to attend 
the Elizabethtown Bible term, Jan. 6 to 18. 

Our Christmas services were well attended. These are 
joyful occasions in the Brooklyn mission. By another 
Christmas we hope to be able to have our much-needed 
churchhouse, where we can give to those desiring to at- 
tend our services better accommodations than a store 
room on a noisy street corner. 

We enter upon 1907 with the definite aim of making 
more out of this year for the Lord than any of the five 
preceding years of our work in Brooklyn. With God 
as guide and our watchword, " On unto perfection," we 
cannot fail. 

We are in receipt of a box of clothing from Manor 
church, Md., also one from Sugar Ridge, Mich., which 
contained a special comforter for our proposed new mis- 
sion home. Whilst we are glad for the " bird before we 
have the cage," yet we would much prefer that the sis- 
ters' aid societies would help us build the mission home 
first, and then we will be ready for the furnishings you 
wish to place into it. 

Sister Elizabeth Will Keller (Pa.) sends her annual box 
of clothing, freight prepaid. It is a great help to our 
work if all freight is prepaid. We trust a hint to the wise 
will be sufficient. 

Those sending us helpful letters for our work during 
the past few days were J. J. Oiler (Pa.), J. M. Miller 
(Pa.), Eld. W. S. Long (Pa.), Brother and Sister I. N. S. 
Will (Pa.), .and Geo. Brindle (Kans.). The Lord reward 
you for your special interest in his work at this place. 

All money sent us for the new church is reported in the 
Missionary Visitor, under " Brooklyn Meetinghouse 
Fund," and not in these notes, However, I wish to make 



this comment on the funds sent us during the past month 
towards the new church. I notice that our ministering 
brehren are more prompt in paying up their pledges than 
the laymembers. Should it be this way? Again I notice 
that some of our preachers pay more than they have 
pledged, even some have doubled their pledges. Yet the 
ministry has the heavier burden to bear. Should it be 
this way? 

We hope to break ground for the new church about 
April 1. It will aid the building committee much if you 
pay up your pledge by that time or sooner. Elder John 
Arnold, of Illinois, increased his pledge to $35, and pays 
it now. Eld. I. J. Roscnberger and wife send us $50, and 
Eld. Ed. M. Howe, Maitland, Pa., sends us $60. Breth- 
ren, "may this abound to your account." Philpp. 4: 17. 

5901 3rd Ave. J. Kurtz Miller. 



FROM MICHIGAN. 



Under the direction of the mission board, Dec. 20, I 
started for Bendon, Mich. But owing to a railroad wreck 
I failed to reach that place. We then spent Sunday, Dec. 
23, in the Lake View church, at Brethren, Mich. We en- 
joyed the Christian Workers' meeting, after which we 
talked to a noble and promising band of young people. 

On Monday we went to Lake Odessa, where we met 
with the state mission board. Since Bro. Hawbaker's 
death we were left with only four members on the board, 
and no secretary and treasurer. The board decided to 
work with four members until the next district meeting. 
The organization now stands with Bro. I. F. Rairigh as 
president and traveling member: D. B. Mote, vice-presi- 
dent; I. C. Snavely, Breedsville, Mich., secretary and 
treasurer; Bro. J. W. Smith. All money and accounts 
for settlement should be sent to the secretary and treas- 
urer. 

I wish to say to the churches of the district that our 
books will be closed Oct. 1. 1907. All money intended 
to be placed in this year's report must be received prior 
to that date. All amounts received after that date will 
be counted in next year's report. We are also needing 
funds, and would very much like to have the churches 
send in the amount apportioned to them at last district 
meeting. We have a large amount of work to be done 
between now and our district meeting. The work is en- 
larging and continually needs greater attention. The 



board is 



anxious to give some assistance to consecrated 



brethren who would change their location. Address cor- 
respondence to I. C. Snavely. 
Breedsville. Mich., Dec. 29. 



HUNTINGTON CITY CHURCH, INDIANA. 



The writer on Dec. 15 closed his work in Huntington, 
Ind., after spending nearly two years in the work. We 
have learned to love and know these dear people in this 
city and esteem them very highly for their work's sake; 
and truly they are a noble band of the Lord's people. 
The congregation knows how to encourage and help their 
pastor, and the Lord has blessed their labors in the cause 
of Christ. 

The church is now in one of the most encouraging 
stages of its history. It has a thriving Sunday school 
and an encouraging Christian Workers' meeting. In the 
past two years the Lord has added twenty-two by letter 
and the same number by baptism to the congregation, 
making the present membership over one hundred and 
fifteen, with a splendid spirit of good fellowship in the 
congregation. Their song service is a strong support to 
their regular services, being in the hands of able leaders. 

These people have a good field of labor in this city 
of about fourteen thousand souls. They certainly have 
bright prospects before them. The two years spent with 
them have been the most pleasant and profitable, from a 
personal standpoint, of our life thus far. The work is 
now in charge of Eld. J. H. Wright, which gives to them 
a resident elder, as well as pastor, and the writer goes 
to the Brethren mission in Minneapolis, Minn. 

Huntington, Ind., Dec. 29. Walter J. Barnhart. 



THE SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS' INSTITUTE. 



In the Northwestern District of Ohio we do not look 
upon the Sunday-school teachers' institute as an experi- 
ment, but a necessity. Its helpfulness to the churches 
will readily be realized when we once consider that the 
great mission of the church is the development of work- 
ers to spread the Gospel. If we would have efficient 
workers to carry the Gospel to every creature, we must 
begin with the training of the children. The children are 
to be the future workers of the church. It is the duty 
of the church to give the children the best Christian 
training possible. 

The institute not only puts the teacher in touch with 
the best methods of teaching and training, but it gives 
to the teacher inspiration and enthusiasm for more and 
better work. In view of the duty and the responsibility of 
the church, our churches cannot Well afford to miss the 
advantages and opportunities which the institutes bring 
to us. 

Our third annual Sunday-school institute shows a very 
healthy growth, both in numbers and interest. May the 
Lord bless it for the accomplishing of much good. 

Fostoria, Ohio, Dec. 29, G. A. Snider. 






THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 






authorities of the people when he said, " The scribes 
and Pharisees sit in Moses' seat; all therefore what- 
soever they bid you observe, that observe and do." 

Jesus' method was the very opposite of the Greeks, 
for they set forth questions and schemes of philosophy 
and invited to disputation. These Jewish teachers 
were regarded as divinely commissioned to teach. 
They were to expound God's decrees. Promiscuous 
discussions were not permitted. Hence it is very 
improbable that Jesus disputed with these doctors of 
the law. 

Again, Jesus would surely not violate all the re- 
ceived maxims of propriety. About twenty years 
later he did array himself against their intensely literal 
interpretations of human traditions, etc., but at the age 
of twelve he could not be said to have done so. 

Then, too, these were men of age and experience, 
and we feel like reverencing old age, though we may 
greatly differ in opinions. We somehow respect 
such because we think they are nearing their journey's 
end from which many shrink, though at the same time 
earnestly desiring to know its secrets. Was Jesus less 
courteous than we toward the aged and legally ap- 
pointed religious body? 

Yet one more reason leads us to think Jesus did not 
dispute with these men. Luke 2:47, "And all that 
heard him were amazed at his understanding and his 
answers." Hence his answers to their questions and 
not his questions showed a richness of intelligence 
not common among Jewish boys of his tender years. 
Therefore we conclude that the title so commonly 
given to this brief narrative or to pictures representing 
it carries a grave error on its face. 
Bridgezvater, Va. 



•FEED MY LAMBS." 



UY JOHN W. WAYLAND. 

St, Peter, himself an elder, said to the elders, 
" Peed the flock of God." St. Paul, another elder, " 
said to the elders, " Feed the church of God." Christ 
Jesus, the great Good Shepherd of all the sheep, said 
to St. Peter, " Feed my lambs." 

Christ reinforced his statement to Peter by putting 
it in a threefold form, with significant variations. 
First he said, " Boske ta arnia niou " — " Feed my 
lambs." The second time he said, " Poima'mc ta 
probata moit " — " Be a shepherd to my sheep." The 
third time he said, " Boske ta probata mou " — " Feed 
my sheep." According to another reading, which is 
probably the correct one, we have the word probatia 
for probata; then the charges, translated literally, 
stand as follows: " Feed my lambs"; " Be a shepherd 
to my little sheep"; " Feed my little sheep." 

The Master wanted to be sure of Peter's love, first 
of all; then he said, "Feed my lambs." The true 
shepherd loves the Chief Shepherd and the flock ; the 
true flock loves the true shepherd and the Chief Shep- 
herd. But the shepherd's chief business is not to love 
the flock, but to feed it. Rather, he is first examined 
upon the question of love, in order that it may be 
ascertained whether it is safe to put the flock in his 
charge; for if he love not the flock he will be as like 
to rob it as to feed it. 

But Christ seemed especially concerned about the 
lambs. So ought we to be. Who are the lambs? 
They are the youngest in the fold. Aged men and 
women may be babes in Christ — lambs in the fold; 
but the boys and girls that are just entering the fold 
are the lambs in a double sense : they, truly, are the 
Master's " little sheep." And the Master wants them 
nourished ; he wants them fed. 

Food is essential to life. Food is essential to growth. 
Properly administered, it produces development and 
strength. Christ wants the lambs to live; he wants 
them to grow and develop; he wants them to become 
strong. He is specially concerned about the lambs; 
for he knows that they need most help : he knows that 
they need most guidance: he knows that they need 
most food, and need it most frequently. The older 
ones of the flock have learned many of the ways lead- 
ing to the green pastures; they know the power and 
comfort of the living waters; but the paths are new 



to the youngest feet; and other waters, not yet known 
to be deadly, linger sweet upon the tongue. Christ 
says, " Feed my lambs." The wolves find it easiest 
to seize the weakest of the flock, and the eagles to 
bear them away. Christ says, " Be a shepherd to my 
little sheep." A shepherd is to teach and guide, as 
well as protect and feed. Really, while doing the one 
thing he does the others also. When he teaches the 
lambs the right paths, — and pastors should be •" apt 
to teach." — he is leading them to food and drink; he 
is also keeping them in a safe place — away from 
precipices and dens of beasts. Sometimes the shep- 
herd must use the crook of correction; but not often, 
if the feeding and leading are properly done. In 
fact, Christ says nothing at all in this connection about 
correction and discipline: it is the feeding of the flock- 
that he is most concerned about. He knows that the 
way to break the sheep of harm's way is to lead them 
in his way, and feed them there ; that the best way to 
keep them from straying off is to give them plenty to 
tat; that the way to keep them out of the jaws of 
wolves and the claws of eagles is to develop their 
strength in green pastures and by clear waters; that 
the way to keep them from disease is to keep them 
clean and warm : in short, he knew that prevention is 
better than cure ; and he is proceeding on that prin-' 
ciple. As some one in modern legal phrase has put 
it, " It is wiser and less expensive to save children 
than to punish criminals." Translated into pastoral 
language, this would be : It is wiser and more profitable 
to care for the lambs and keep them healthy than it 
is to doctor sick sheep. All this is comprehended in 
our Lord's charge: "Feed my lambs; be a shepherd 
to my little sheep." 

Christ knew that one good pastor — shepherd, 
bishop, elder — with the love and confidence and 
acquaintance of his flock, working daily in their homes 
and hearts, can prevent more disease and mischief, 
especially among the young members of the church, 
than a whole congregation in council once a quarter 
can cure. It is pastors — lamb-shepherds — that the 
church needs : it is pastors — feeders and leaders of 
the little sheep— that the church must have. And the 
Brethren church needs them most of all, because it 
has so few. It is this one thing that is our greatest 
need to-day. How soon will each elder in the church 
realize this? And how soon will each congregation 
realize it? The elder ought to lead in this as in all 
other church business ; but he cannot do the thing 
alone. The elder does not want to push himself for- 
ward ; for he is human and so are his flock ; but as 
soon as a congregation says to its elder, " We need 
you, and Christ needs you, to feed the lambs and the 
sheep; we want you to quit business and attend to 
the church's greatest need, and we are going to make 
it possible for you to do this thing," I dare say, the 
elder will be ready and glad to respond. Christ said: 
" The laborer is worthy of his hire " ; but he did not 
say it while the twelve were giving most of their time 
to fishing. The man who gives only one-seventh of 
his time to the church cannot expect to live of the 
church ; and the church will certainly not get very 
much life from him; neither can any congregation 
demand of its elder's time without making it possible 
for him to give it. Christ says to the church, " The 
laborer is worthy of his hire " ; he says to the elder, 
" Feed my lambs." Thus the whole matter is adjusted, 
and the church's great need is met. But it requires 
a united response ; it takes the whole church to answer ; 
and until there comes this united response of elder and 
laity in unison, Girist's burning question, " Lovest 
thou me?" will be unanswered, and Christ's Iambs 
— his little sheep — will continue to stray into forbidden 
paths and to die for the want of food. 

University of Virginia. 



NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SEVEN. 



KURTZ MILLER. 



New Year's Day gives us an opportunity to re- 
view the past, to reflect upon the present, and to 
resolve for the future. 

Improvement along any line is not bv chance. It 



comes by earnest resolve and hard work. 1907 will 
be just what we make it. If we will it may be — 

"A year divine, 
Transfigured from above, 
With all its days like heaven's heights, 
Filled with God's light and love." 

The happiness of looking back upon a good year 
largely depends on whether we have — 
I. Surrendered Completely. 

If you have any bad habits, drop them; any evil 
associations, leave them; any enemies, forgive them. 
Are there such things which you cannot drop, or 
leave or forgive, ask help of God and believe that he 
is only too willing to give you victory. Having sur- 
rendered the evil and turned from it, give God your 
best. Let him have your time to dispose of as he sees 
best. He needs your lips, to speak just the right 
word. He needs your hands to help the needy cause. 
He .needs your heart to love the erring into the way 
of life. He needs his " tenth " — which of course we 
never (?) withhold — to spread the "good news" of 
salvation. 

II. Trust Lovingly. 

We cannot stagger at any promise of the Lord, 
when " love for God " fills our hearts.. Much of our 
trouble and failure is because of a lack of love and 
trust in our God. " When we worry, we do not trust, 
and when we trust we do not worry." The measure 
of our trust is the measure of our proving the promises 
of God in the hard places of life. 

Turn in your Bible to the fifteenth chapter of John, 
and notice the " abiding trust " Jesus had in the 
Father. Underscore the seven " abides," and the six- 
teen uses of the possessive pronoun " My." Read, 
and reread, until you feel some of the nearness of the 
Father that Jesus felt when he said, " My Father." 
Notice the expressions " my joy," " my friends," " my 
name's sake." It is a hard heart that cannot be won 
into " loving trustfulness," after a prayerful study of 
the "life of our Lord." 

III. Obey Faithfully. 

A French soldier is quoted as having said, "If 
Napoleon had bid his soldiers march to the moon, 
they would have started." To say the least this shows 
the spirit of obedience. Napoleon was a great man, 
but was finally defeated and died in exile. But our 
Lord Jesus Christ knows no defeat ! He has con- 
quered death and the grave! Shall our obedience to 
him be anything less than the most faithful obedience? 
We are not surprised to see the zig-zag life of some, 
when we behold how lightly they regard their bap- 
tismal vow. And need we be surprised that trouble 
and disappointments roll in upon some who have made 
still more solemn vows to God and the church, and 
obey not? Is it faithful obedience, when- one is in- 
stalled in the sacred office of the ministry and promises 
to conform to the order of the Brotherhood in all 
things, even to the parting of the hair, and then 
because of the tastes of a wife, obeys her in preference 
to the promises made before God to the church ? May 
this year 1907 bring us closer to the Lord. May our 
obedience be as unto him and not the carnal mind. 

IV. Submit Cheerfully. 

1907 will be " the year of our Lord," if we allow 
him to live with us, teach us, and guide our life. It 
is our year, and not the Lord's, when we are not 
submissive to him. May this prayer of submission be 
ours : 

"Lord, I would not have a hand to guide, but thine; 
For thou hast trod where sinners stray 
And knowest well life's troubled way, and mine. 

" Lord, 1 would not have a hand to rule, but thine, 
For thou art wise as thou art good 
And none can better choose what should be mine. 

" Lord, help me to tread the sorest path, for thee. 
For thou canst make the roughest plain 
Give joy for grief and calm the pain, for me," 

V. Pray Confidentially. 

Speak to the Lord as you would to your dearest 
friend about every detail of your life. Make your 
secret prayer a time of sweet communion. He has 
promised to reward thee openly. Thou nor thy wife 
needest not publish thy secret praying. It will mani- 
fest itself in kind words, loving sacrifice, a forgiving 
spirit, returning good for evil, a real live interest in 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



the work of the church. We will never complain thai 
we have much to do.- but rather seek opportunity to 
do more. 

" What shall I ask for the coming year? 
What shall my watchword be? 
What wouldst thou do for me, dear Lord? 
What can I do for thee? 
" Lord. I ask for a holy year, 
Thy faith and love divine; 
Taking my fidl inheritance, 
Making thy fullness mine. 

" Lord, f ask for the dying world, 
Stretch forth thy mighty hand, 
Thy truth proclaim, thy power display 
This year in every land." 

jpoi 3rd Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

BAPTISM OF THE HOLY SPIRIT. 



DY E. L. CARTER. 

Is sanctification merely consecration? We con- 
secrate ourselves to God's service. So if consecration 
is sanctification we sanctify ourselves. Is man able 
to do that? If he is, then why can he not save him- 
self? We have to go to God for regeneration. When 
we are regenerated we are born into the kingdom of 
God and are God's children until we sin ; and when we 
commit the first sin, we cease to be children of God, 
for " Whosoever is born of God doth not commit sin." 
1 John 3:9. " He that committeth sin is of the devil." 
1 John 3:8. 

Does regeneration take the tendency to sin out of 
us? Paul says in Romans 7:19-25, "For the good 
that I would, / do not; but the evil which I would 
not, tlmt I do. Now if I do that I would not, it is 
no more I that do it, but sin that dwelieth in me." 
(Not sins but sin, singular number, sin.) "For I 
delight in the law of God after the inward man ; but 
I see another law in my members, warring against the 
law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to 
the law of sin which is in my members " (causing me 
to sin). "O wretched man that I am! who shall 
deliver me from the body of this death ? I thank God 
through Jesus Christ our Lord." That then is the 
remedy. It is evident that Paul was speaking to 
regenerated people, using his own experience to il- 
lustrate his meaning. Their sins were forgiven, but 
they still had inbred sin, or sin in the flesh. Rom. 
6: 12. " Let not .riii reign in your mortal body, that 
ye should obey it in the lusts thereof." 

What does Paul mean by asking the disciples, 
" Have ye received the Holy Ghost since ye believed? " 
Acts 19 : 2. The Word says they were certain 
disciples; they believed and had been baptized unto 
John's baptism. Acts 19:3. What was John's 
baptism? Mark 1:4. "John did baptize in the 
wilderness, and preach the baptism of repentance for 
the remission of sins." So you see they believed, had 
repented, were baptized and were disciples, but had 
not received the Holy Ghost; for they told Paul so. 
Matt. 3:11. John says: "I indeed baptize you with 
water unto repentance, but one cometh after me who 
will baptize you with the Holy Ghost and fire." 

What is the baptism of the Holy Ghost for? It 
undoubtedly is for believers, and they do not get it 
when regenerated, for these disciples had not received 
it at regeneration. It must take out that tendency to 
sin and make us every whit whole. If not, what does 
he do? Now we know by our own experiences that 
there is a something in us that causes us to sin, yet 
• we do not want to sin. John 1 : 29. " John seeth 
Jesus coming unto him, and sayeth, Behold the Lamb 
of God, which taketh away the sin of the world." 
(Sin, singular number.) Is he able? The Word says 
so. But does the reader believe he wdll do it? " Let 
not sin reign in your mortal body." " Sin not." " Be 
ye perfect." " Be ye holy." Now can we be pure, holy, 
and perfect with inbred sin in our heart,, that we in- 
herited from Adam, causing us to sin when we do 
not want to? See Rom. 7: 19, " For the good that I 
would, I do not: but the evil which I would not, that 

I do It is no more I that do it, but 

sin that dwelieth in me." We are not responsible for 
having inbred sin, but responsible for keeping it, when 
Christ came to " take away the sin of the world." 



Have we, as a church, forgotten Pentecost/ Do we 
really know the meaning, of the baptism of the Holy 
Spirit? Now is a sinless life attainable? It must 
be, or God would not have commanded such. Matt. 
5 : 4S, " Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father 
which is in heaven is perfect." 1 Peter 1 : 16, " Be- 
cause it is written, Be ye holy ; for I am holy." Eph. 
1 : 4. Gal. 5 : 16. " This I say then. Walk in the Spirit, 
and ye shall not fulfill the lust of the flesh." Gal. 5 : 24, 
" And they that are Christ's have crucified the flesh 
with the affections and lusts." Gal. 5 : 25, "If we live 
in the Spirit, let us also walk in the Spirit." Eph. 
4:24. "That ye put on the new man which after 
God is created in righteousness and true holiness." 
It is taught in prayer. Psalm 10:51. John 17:17, 
" Sanctify them through thy truth : thy word is truth." 
Now observe, Christ is praying for those that the 
Father has given him. Read the entire chapter and 
see for yourself. 1 Thess. 5 : 23, " And the very God 
of peace sanctify you wholly ; and I pray God your 
whole spirit and soul and body be preserved blameless 
unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ." Heb. 
13:20, 21. "It has been experienced." Isa. 6:5-7, 
" And thine iniquity is taken away, and thy sin 
purged" (not sins, but sin). Rom. 6:6-22. Rev. 
14:5, "It is obtained by faith." Acts 15:9, "And 
put no difference between us and them, purifying their 
hearts by faith." Heb. 10:14, "For by one offering 
he hath perfected forever them that are sanctified." 
Heb. 10: 18. " Now where remission of these is, there 
is no more offering for sin." Heb. 10: 19. " Having 
therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holiest 
by the blood of Jesus." What does the " holiest " here 
mean? Nothing more or less than sanctification 
entered into by the baptism of the Holy Spirit, which 
is obtained by faith in the blood of Jesus Christ to 
cleanse from all unrighteousness." Know ye not that 
so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were 
baptized into his death?" "Therefore we are buried 
with him by baptism into death." This means the 
baptism of the Holy Spirit, not water baptism, which 
symbolizes the baptism of the Holy Spirit. Just as 
Christ died on the cross, so we die to sin in this 
baptism. 

Little River. Kans. 



this comment on the funds sent us during the past month 
towards the new church. I notice that our ministering 
hrehren arc more prompt in paying up their pledges than 
the laymemhers. Should it be this way? Again I notice 
that some of our preachers pay more than they have 
pledged, even some have doubled their pledges. Yet the 
ministry has the heavier burden to bear. Should it be 
this way? 

We hope to break ground for the new church about 
April 1. It will aid the building committee much if you 
pay up your pledge by that time or sooner. Elder John 
Arnold, of Illinois, increased his pledge to $35. and pays 
it now. Eld. 1. J. Rosenbergcr and wife send us $50. and 
Eld. Ed. M. Howe, Maitland. Pa., sends us $60. Breth- 
ren, "may this abound to your account." Philpp. 4: 17. 

5901 3rd Ave. J. Kurtz Miller. 



CORRESPONDENCE 



"Write what thou scest. nnrt f 



FROM BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



With the opening of the new year our hearts arc glad- 
dened in more ways than one. The Lord is adding to 
our number " such as should be saved." The young man 
from India, of whom mention was made in my former 
notes, was among the number baptized. His heathen 
name is Ranjit Singh, but at our suggestion be adds the 
Christian name of "James." Therefore he shall hereafter 
be known as James Ranjit Singh. He expects to attend 
the Elizaietbtown Bible term, Jan. 6 to 18. 

Our Christmas services were well attended. These arc 
joyful occasions in the Brooklyn mission. By another 
Christmas we hope to he able to have our much-needed 
cburchhouse, where we can give to those desiring t<. at- 
tend our services better accommodations than a store 
room on a noisy street corner. 

We enter upon 1907 with the delinite aim of making 
more out of this year for the Lord than any of the five 
preceding years of our work in Brooklyn. With God 
as guide and our watchword, " On unto perfection," we 
cannot fail 

We are in receipt of a box of clothing from Manor 
church, Md., also one from Sugar Ridge, Mich., which 
contained a special comforter for our proposed new mis- 
sion home. Whilst we are glad for the " bird before we 
have the cage," yet we would much prefer that the sis- 
ters' aid societies would help us build the mission home 
first, and then we will be ready for the furnishings you 
wish to place into it. 

Sister Elizabeth Will Keller (Pa.) sends her annual box 
of clothing, freight prepaid. It is a great help to our 
work if all freight is prepaid. We trust a bint to the wise 
will be sufficient. 

Those sending us helpful letters for our work during 
the past few days were J. J. Oiler (Pa.), J. M. Miller 
(Pa.), Eld. W. S. Long (Pa.), Brother and Sister I. N. S. 
Will (Pa.), .and Geo. Brindle (Kans.). The Lord reward 
you for your special interest in bis work at this place. 

All money sent us for the new church is reported in the 
Missionary Visitor, under " Brooklyn Meetinghouse 
Fund," and not in these notes. However, I wish to make 



FROM MICHIGAN. 



Under the direction of the mission hoard. Dec. 20, I 
started for Bendon, Mich. But owing to a railroad wreck 
I failed to reach that place. We then spent Sunday, Dec. 
23, in the Lake View church, at Brethren, Mich. We en- 
joyed the Christian Workers' meeting, after which wc 
talked to a noble and promising band of young people. 

On Monday we went to Lake Odessa, where wc met 
with the state mission hoard. Since Bro. Hawbaker's 
death we were left with only four members on the board, 
and no secretary and treasurer. The board decided to 
work with four members until the next district meeting. 
The organization now stands with Bro, T. F. Uairigh as 
president and traveling member; D, B. Mote, vice-presi- 
dent; I, C. Suavely, Breedsville, Mich., secretary and 
treasurer; Bro. J. W. Smith. Ml money and accounts 
for settlement should he scut to the secretary and treas- 
urer. 

I wish to say to the churches of the district that our 
books will be closed Oct. 1, 1907. All money intended 
to be placed in this year's report must be received prior 
to that date. All amounts received after that date will 
be counted in next year's report. We arc also needing 
funds, and would very much like to have the churches 
send in the amount apportioned to them at last district 
meeting. Wc have a large amount of work to be done 
between now and our district meeting. The work is en- 
larging and continually needs greater attention, The 
heard is anxious to give some assistance to consecrated 
brethren who would change their location. Address cor- 
respondence to I. C. Suavely. 
Breedsville, Mich., Dec. 29. 



HUNTINGTON CITY CHURCH, INDIANA. 



The writer on Dec. 15 closed his work in Huntington, 
Tnd., after spending nearly two years in the work. We 
have learned to love and know these dear people in this 
city and esteem them very highly for their work's sake; 
and truly they are a noble band of the Lord's people. 
The congregation knows how to encourage and help their 
pastor, and the I .nnl has blessed their labors in the cause 
of Christ. 

The church is now in one of the most encouraging 
stages of its history. It lias a thriving Sunday school 
and an encouraging Christian Workers' meeting. In the 
past two years the Lord has added twenty-two by letter 
and the same number by baptism to the congregation, 
making the present membership over one hundred and 
fifteen, with a splendid spirit of good fellowship in the 
congregation. Their song service is a strong support to 
their regular services, being in the hands of able leaders. 

These people have a good field of labor in this city 
of about fourteen thousand souls. They certainly have 
bright prospects before them. The two years spent with 
them have been the most pleasant and profitable, from a 
personal standpoint, of our life thus far. The work is 
now in charge of Eld. J. II. Wright, which gives to them 
a resident elder, as well as pastor, and the writer goes 
to the Brethren mission in Minneapolis, Minn. 

Huntington. Ind., Dec. 29. Walter J. Barnhart. 



THE SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS' INSTITUTE. 



In the Northwestern District of Ohio wc do not look 
upon the Sunday-school teachers' institute as an experi- 
ment but a necessity. Its helpfulness to the churches 
will readily be realized when we once consider that the 
great mission of the church is the development of work- 
ers to spread the Gospel. If we would have efficient 
workers to carry the Gospel to every creature we must 
begin with the training of the children. The children are 
to be the future workers of the church. t is the duty 
of the church to give the children the best Christian 
training possible. 

The institute not only puts the teacher in touch with 
the best methods of teaching and training, but it gives 
to the teacher inspiration and enthusiasm for more and 
better work. In view of the duty and the responsibility of 
the church, our churches cannot Well afford to miss the 
advantages and opportunities which the institutes bring 
to us. 

Our third annual Sunday-school institute shows a very 
healthy growth, both in numbers and interest. May the 
Lord bless it for the accomplishing of much good. 

Fostoria, Ohio, Dec. 29, G. A. Snider. 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



■ 



YE ARE MY WITNESSES.— Luke 24: 48. 
BY C. H. BAESBAUGH. 

How dark, how dreary, how cold, how barren is 
life where there is no love. How bright, how sweet, 
how heavenly where love -reigns. In every heart 
where Jesus is enthroned, love dominates the entire 
being — mind, heart, tongue, hands, and feet. This is 
the great lesson God wants to teach us through the 
incarnation and sacrifice of his only Son. What slow, 
dull disciples we are. And the Holy Ghost is so 
ready and willing to teach us. And he has such 
glorious things to communicate. John 16: 13, 14, 15. 
All the fullness of the Godhead is at his disposal. 
Col. 2 : 9. Christ is the Father's witness. The Holy 
Ghost is Christ's witness. And we witness through 
the Spirit the beauty of Jesus. 

Religion means life — the very life of God : and God 
is love. This is the essence and totality of his being. 
This is all concentrated in him who is our example, 
our atonement, and our intercessor. Religion does 
not all evaporate in emotion. It is more than a shout, 
or vociferous alleluia. It is a divinely illuminated 
mind, a holy heart, a life running over with the love 
of God for the good of humanity. It is witnessing 
for Jesus that salvation is nothing less than God 
manifest in the flesh, revealing himself in all our 
words and works. It is all summed up in Gal. 2 : 20. 
Position, influence, fame, money, are all given to us 
as means for the promotion of God's glorious work 
in the redemption of man. The first, deepest, ruling 
thought of the Christian is, How can I do most good 
to my fellow-beings, and glorify my Lord and Savior? 
This low, mean, treacherous, God-deposing self must 
be utterly crucified, and have no more regnancy in our 
life. Daily we must be hammering the nails of the 
cross to bring us into perfect and blessed conformity 
to the crucified Godman. It run be done. It must be 
done. If Christ is in us it will be done. This, and 
only this, is salvation. 

If we " know Jesus, and the power of his resurrec- 
tion, and the fellowship of his sufferings," we will 
be a shining light, and a wise teacher, and a skillful 
worker, and win many souls into the kingdom of God. 
Philpp. 3:10; Walt. 5:10; John 5:17, and 12:32. 
As Jesus is the revelation of the Father, so must we 
be transcripts of the Son. It is impossible for any 
soul to enshrine Jesus and not yearn for the salvation 
of the lost. The same love that brought Jesus from 
heaven to Bethlehem, to Gethsemane, to Calvary, is 
shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost. Rom. 
5 : 5. Tin's fills and fires our missionaries, at home 
and abroad. This very day I received a letter from 
a brother who is all the year engaged in evangelistic 
work, whose heart seems to get every pulse straight 
from the heart of Jesus. Truly our labor is not in 
vain in the Lord. 1 Cor. 15:58. Let us prayerfully 
study this passage. It contains some of the most 
inspiring words in the vocabulary of grace. When 
the ledger of eternity is opened it will be verified. 
May the " mightily " of Col. 1 : 29 prevail in us all. 
Union Deposit, Pa. 



True, some people do seem to have better success 
than others ; but perhaps we do not know what trials 
and disappointments they have met with, nor how 
often they have struggled with obstacles that seemed 
like impregnable barriers to the realization of their 
hopes; but, like Jacob of old, they wrestled on till 
they obtained the coveted prize. In that long night of 
struggle God was preparing Jacob for the work that 
was before him. No doubt in after years, when great 
trials came, he would think of the blessing he had 
received from his hard struggle with the strong 
power that night when his thigh was maimed. Then 
he felt that — 

" God is wisdom, God is love." 
It may be necessary that misfortune come to us 
sometimes ; perhaps we are trusting too much in our 
own strength, and neglecting to honor the Master, and 
what we consider " hard luck " may be a blessing in 
disguise. God sometimes chastens his children, but 
he always does it in love and wisdom, and although we 
may wince and lament — 



for all classes. There is no historian equal to Moses ; 
no poetry equal to Job's, David's, or Solomon's; no 
pathos equal to Judah's appeal to Joseph ; no sermon 
equal to the Sermon on the Mount; no oration equal 
to Paul's at Athens. If you want to be a minister 
" that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the 
word of truth," you have nothing to fear, use the 
Bible. 
Broadway, I'a. 



WE DIE TO LIVE. 



" That gentle stroke may 
To our forgiving God." 



us back 



James says : " If any of you lack wisdom, let him 
ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and tlp- 
braidetli not ; and it shall be given him." Every good 
thing comes from God, and whether prosperity 
smiles, or adversity seems to frown on us, let us look 
up and say — 

" God is wisdom, God is love." 
R. D. 2, Ashland, Ohio. 



We die with Jesus in baptism, and thereby unite 
with him in his attitude towards sin. This death with 
him, by symbol, covenants permanent relation with 
him as a principle whereby we are ever dead with 
Christ to sin. Union with him in his death is the 
necessary step towards union with Jesus in his resur- 
rection, wherein the " new creature " brought forth 
in us is united with the resurrected Jesus and has 
relation with him to his present glorified life as well 
as to heaven, the Father and all things eternal. 

No way is provided by which we may come into 
spiritual relation to Jesus resurrected without first 
coming into closest union and attitude with him, dead 
to sin, the flesh and the world. No cross, no crown, 
and life through death are fixed principles. Jesus led 
along this way, and we must follow to attain to life 
with him. 
McPhersott, Kans. 






CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TOPIC 



A LITTLE CHILD SHALL LEAD THEM. 



For Sunday Evening, January 13. 1907. 



BY OMA KARN. 



GOD IS WISDOM, GOD IS LOVE. 
BY IDA M. HELM. 

We make our plans, and with buoyant spirits we 
set about carrying them out. For awhile all goes well 
and it seems to us that our brightest hopes and our 
highest ambitions are about to be realized, then we 
begin to think, " What an important person I am ; 
how wisely I planned this work and how splendidly I 
am completing it." 

While we are thus musing upon our own greatness, 
suddenly the tall spires of our grand work ( ?) begin 
to topple and soon the whole structure comes tumbling 
in a heap at our feet. Then we wonder why fortune 
frowns on us so often and smiles on some one else 
that we have in our mind ; and we imagine that every- 
thing always goes in his favor. Thus, while prosperity 
fingers with us, we esteem ourselves very highly and 
claim much honor for ourselves; but when adverse 
winds blow we try to shift the blame to fortune, and 
we say, " Fortune is always against us," 



God's Word bids us seek wisdom. Sometimes we 
find this wisdom in unexpected places. The following 
incident shows that quite often we find it taught by- 
one of the best of teachers— a little child. 

Lyman is the little son of our earnest minister. 
When he was as yet a tiny lad an aunt made him a 
present of a little red Testament. The mother, like 
a mother of old, carefully instructed him in the teach- 
ings of the sacred Book. Especially did she seek 
to impress upon his mind the teaching of Ephesians 
6. Did this youthful Timothy show any signs of 
disobedience in any form, he was told to go and read 
that particular chapter; and it was seldom that any- 
more reproof was needed. 

One day recently— a day of trial and perplexities 
such as. come into the lives of all of us— the mother's 
patience had been severely tried, and under the stress 
of it she reproved the child for some slight fault with 
unnecessary severity. Quietly the little boy arose 
from his play, and going into another room soon re- 
turned with his little Testament. Gravely handing it 
to her, he said, " Mamma, wouldn't yon feel better 
if you would read awhile in my little book? " 

It is needless to say that mother learned a lesson 
that day. 

Covington, Ohio. 



RISEN WITH CHRIST.-Eph. 2^6 

Though dead in sin. " quickened,"-made alive with 
Christ. Col. 2: 3. 

Dying brought suffering; this in turn brought its re- 
ward. 

Notice comes to each one who is" quickened. 
" We shall live with him." 2 Tim. 2: II. 
We shall reign. 
"Live." 2 Tim. 2: 11. 
" Sit in heavenly places." Epli. 2: 6. 
"Rejoice." I Peter 4: 13. 
" Be joint heirs." Rom. 8: 17. 
" Be glorified." Rom. 8: 17. 
"Be in glory." Col. 3: 4. 
"Reign." 2 Tim. 2: 12. 

As we have these assurances we may know we are 
risen with Christ. 
Old things are passed away; behold all things arc new. 



PRAYER MEETING 



For Week Beginning January 13, 1907. 



" PROVE ME NOW, SAITH THE LORD OF HOSTS." 
Mai. 3: 10. 



THE MINISTER AND THE BIBLE. 
BY D. HAYS. 

It is not the man who has read many books that 
we fear to meet in debate, but the one who is well 
read in a few. The one Book for the minister is the 
Bible. It is not enough that he get in close touch 
with the Bible through other books ; he must make the 
Bible a part of himself. He must read it, study it. 
know it, feel it— his life-pulse must beat with it, and 
in it. When he speaks he must feel it pulsating 
through all his veins and arteries. He must have it 
at his fingers' ends for illustration ; in his heart for 
persuasion ; in his mind for conviction. 

There are helps to the study of the Bible,— a Bible 
dictionary, concordance, lexicon, and to the one who 
has studied the language, a Greek Testament and 
Lexicon, if he would drink at the fountain head. Then 
as an aid to a pure style the Bible language itself 
is simple enough, and broad enough, and high enough, 



11. 



God Wants Us to Prove Him. 

1. We need a blessing. Psa. 40: 4, " Blessed is the 
man that maketll the Lord his trust." Are we 
willing to put this matter to the test? We need 
not fear to exhaust his rich treasury. 

2. Precious promises are ours. 2 Peter 2: 9, " The 
Lord is not slack concerning his promises'." He 
expects us to lay hold and enjoy every one of 
them. Trust, obey, and get the promised blessing. 

How Ought We to Prove Him? 



■ In prayer. There are special privileges at the 
throne of grace. Matt. 18: 19. There is comfort 
and power for every burdened soul. 

2. In faith. Our spiritual attainments are dependent 
on our faith. " According to your faith " will be 
the structure of our spiritual building. Matt. 9: 29. 
Well may we pray, " Lord, increase our faith ! " 

3. Use every means of grace. Strength, power abil- 
ity, Isa. 40: 29; 1 Peter 4: 11. Deliverance, Psa. 
18: SO. Peace, John 14: 27. 

4. Consecrate yourself to the Lord, with all you have 
.and are. Rom. 12: 1, 2. This means yourself, and 

also your possessions. 
III. The Result of Proving Him. 

1. Peace. Isa. 26: 3, " Thou wilt keep him in perfect 
peace, whose mind is stayed on thee; because he 
trusteth in thee." Peace is the Christian resting 
in the green pastures, reclining beside the still 
waters. 

2. Joy. Fullness of joy, 1 John 1: 4. Spiritual joy is 
love exulting. It is a surrendering of itself to 
bhss without foreboding, knowing that with Christ 
all is well here and hereafter, 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



HOME AND FAMILY 



A NEW YEAR'S PRAYER. 



Of thee, dear Lord, I ask 

No thing save this, 
111 each appointed task 

To find hut bliss. 
Make thou my heart to sing 

With joy and be 
A lute whose every string 

Yields melody. 

Touch thou mine eyes to find 

Of life the best- 
Peace and companions kind, 

Labor and rest. 

Thine be the call to give 

Gladness each day; 
Lord, while 'tis mine to live, 

For this I pray. 
Keep thou my courage strong; 

My hopes keep high; 
So shall I live like song 

And like song, die. 

— Frank Dempster Sherman. 



home where gentleness rules, where an uplifted 
finger, a softly spoken reproof in the next room will 
do what scolding and whipping fail to bring about 
in other homes. When father has had a hard, 
difficult day in the office, the light in the window 
beckons him to a place of quiet and rest. If the home 
is a farmhouse, and the farmer has been hard at work 
until an aching back and limbs make him long for 
rest, the clean kitchen and loving welcome make of his 
home the dearest place on earth. When the children 
come to father to show him what progress they have 
made in their lessons, when they talk over the won- 
derful events that took place in school that day ; when 
the little one in the first grade exhibits his drawings 
with pride ; when the children find something to do 
all the evening, and none of them arc away from 
home ; such a home comes nearer being a palace with- 
out a care than the one at Sans-Souci, 



A NEW YEAR'S REMINDER. 



The season's joy you wish us — 

For that we thank you, dear; 
Yet wishes arc not quite enough 

To bring a glad New Year. 

Watch day by day, my darling, 

For helpful work to do, 
And through the new year you yourself 

Will make your wish come true. 

—Mary F.Butts. 
■ • ■ 

AID SOCIETY, LOON CREEK CHURCH. SALA- 
MONIA CONGREGATION, INDIANA. 



Our society was organized March 15, 1906, and up 
until Dee. 19 we held eighteen meetings, with an 
average attendance of eight. Our work consisted of 
piecing quilts and comfort tops ; we completed two 
quilts and one comforter; made three little dresses 
We worry too much. That some men have died of vm \ tw0 aprons, etc., to which were added a number 



THE PALACE WITHOUT A CARE. 



BY ELIZABETH D. ROSENBERGER. 



overwork is no doubt true, but this does not alter 
the fact that work pure and simple is the rarest of 
all rare causes of death. It is the worry which goes 
with the work that causes death. We may not under- 
stand the process by which worry undermines the 
general health, induces disease of the heart or the 
arteries, or kills a man before his time; but that it 
does do these things is a fact only too well established. 



When Frederick the Great wished to escape from Women grow wrinkled and old long before their time 22. 



of articles donated, girls' jackets, boys' coats, vests 
and pants, also ten yards of outing, all of which were 
sent to the Mexico, Ind., Orphanage, for Christmas 
gifts. Amount of money received during the year was 
$14.23 ; amount paid out, $10.90, leaving a balance of 
$3.33 in the treasury. We realize our efforts are weak, 
yet we feel that some little good is being done.— Mary 
A. Shidcler. Sec, Huntington, Intl., R. F. D. 5, Dec. 



the burdens and anxieties of state into the care-free 
atmosphere of private life, he went to Sans-Souci, the 
palace without care, as its name signifies. The palace 
is beautiful within and without. In one room the " 
floor is so exquisitely polished that visitors are re- 
quired to put on soft slippers over their boots before 
they are permitted to walk across it to examine the 
rare china which it contains. Very beautiful is the 
park of Sans-Souci with its great beds of forget-me- 
nots and lilies of the valley and the songs of innu- 
merable birds. Splendid fountains, deep green bowers, 
with statuary gleaming whitely in its shady recesses, 
make of this place a paradise. And we can imagine 
the king coming here and trying to shut out care and 
sorrow from this palace. 

Can your home be called a palace without a care? 
No, I am sure it does not deserve that title. Yet so 
far as we can we should banish care and unhappiness 
from our homes. The burdens of this twentieth cen j 
tury civilization rest heavily upon us. Household 
cares are many and mother is the toiling, watching, 
unwearied dispenser of comforts and blessings to 
those about her. Some say that the women of to-day 
lack the sturdy heroism of our grandmothers. We 
admire the stout-hearted pioneer woman of a hundred 
years ago, but she was no nobler than the woman 
of to-day. Her life was not so full of care, her prob- 
lems were less complex than those which confront 
us. How shall we simplify our manner of living ; and 
how shall we redeem the time that we may have more 
leisure for the sweet and simple pleasures of home 
life? Very often the struggle to have things better 
than our neighbors makes a show-place of our homes 
— a palace indeed, but a palace with many cares. In 
' the struggle sometimes debts are contracted and men 
of reputed honesty rush into transactions which bring 
a shadow upon their names. Not in this way can be 
found a palace without a care. 

Shall we strive for social position and favor at the 
cost of a quiet and peaceful home life ? No, we can- 
not afford this; neither can we regulate our lives by 



because they take such anxious thought for the 
morrow. No one who is not given to worry can 
conceive of the power which the habit gains over its 
victim. He will admit that it is wrong, but he cannot 
help himself; it is almost impossible to break the habit. 
We desire greatly to possess something, and in si riving 
to gratify that desire we waste so much time by 
worrying that fulfillment is delayed. Home is full 
of care, where this harassing anxiety and impatient 
expectation holds sway. And if wc measure life by its 
yield of contentment, inspiration and usefulness, those 
who worry fall below the standard. 

But. however carefully wc avoid worry, and toil and 
plan for happier homes, there is not one from which 
care, and sorrow can be debarred. They enter and 
confront us ; then wc must battle against them as best 
we may. God has placed us here to ameliorate the 
hard conditions, to widen sympathies, to make more 
beautiful this world-home of ours. Only as trouble 
and care have come into our own lives can wc sym- 
pathize with others, and that may be the cause for 
our light afflictions. Then, if wc patiently persist in 
doing our duty as we, should, in loving others as we 
are commanded, when we reach the home prepared for 



SISTERS' MISSION CIRCLE, COON RIVER 
CHURCH, PANORA, IOWA. 



( )ur Sisters' Mission Circle held thirteen meetings 
during the six months ending Dec. 20, 1906, with an 
average attendance of seventeen. We received as 
donations, and tor work, $577-': our expenses were 
$54.5S. During this time we quilted four quilts; 
knotted seven comforts, made new garments, pieced 
quilt patches, and sewed several pounds of carpet rags. 
Wc sent forty-eight pieces of clothing and $5 to Dos 
Moines. Iowa, mission; thirty-nine pieces and $5 to 
the Christian Home at Council Bluffs, Iowa, and 
nineteen pieces of clothing, two pairs of shoes and 
$5 to the Chicago mission. We also donated $5 to 
the poor at home. — Sister Eva l'iscel, Supt. i Sister 
Florence Long, Sec, Box 2-M, Panora, Iowa, Dec 21. 



SISTERS' AID SOCIETY, SALAMONIA. INDIANA. 

Since December, 1905, we have held twelve regular 
meetings, besides several called meetings, with all 
At our last meeting 



average attendance of sixteen. 

we reorganized, and decided to send a bos. containing 
us beyond, wc shall find that we have entered a forty . eigl „ garmC nts and three new comforters, to the 

Chicago missions. During the last year we received 



veritable palace without care, one in which there is 
neither sorrow nor crying nor any pain, for God him- 
self shall wipe all tears from their eyes. " Happiness 
is a great love and much serving." 

" Though earth lias full many a beautiful spot 
As a poet or painter might show, . . . . 

Yet more lovely and beautiful, holy and bright, 
To the hopes of the heart and the spirit s glad sight, 
Is the land that no mortal may know. 

Covington, Ohio. 



$3.50 for quilting; $6 for comforters sold; $5.27 as 
collection, making a total of $14.77. Our expenses 
were $11.75, leaving in the treasury $'V,7, including 
$6.65 in the treasury at the beginning of the year. 
We earnestly pray the Lord to bless us and give us 
all strength that we may do more during the coming 
year.— Dessie Heaston, Sec, Salamonia, Ind., Dec IX. 



PASADENA. CAL, AID SOCIETY. 



THANKSGIVING ON THE MEDITERRANEAN. 



BY S. M. GOUCHNOUR. 



Nov. 29th being Thanksgiving Day in our home- 
land, we felt then we should observe it, even if we 
what people say; because the opinion of our neighbors were on the Great Sea. Hence, at 8 P. M., by per 
has really no bearing on the things in our individual 



life that are worth while. Let us not overdo things, 
nor overcrowd our homes with useless furnishings, 
tat let us make our lives simple and honest and satis- 
fying to our highest ideals. This is the first step 
toward making home a palace without a care. Then 



mission of the captain, we held our meeting in the 
dining room. It was decided that all who wished 
should have an opportunity to speak. Nearly all of 
us had a few remarks to make, the writer being called 
on to open the exercises. We felt that we had a good 
meeting. We felt, too. we ought to make a little 



Some months ago the sisters of the Pasadena, Cal., 
church organized an Aitl Society. We have bail an 
average attendance of seven. We have been quilting 
and sewing for others, making aprons, etc. 

At the Thanksgiving collection wc gave $5 for 
mission work and recently another $5 to the Chicago 
mission. It only shows that even a few willing 
workers can accomplish something for the Lord's 
work.— Elizabeth M. Weiler, Sec. 



let gentleness pervade the atmosphere, let it shine from offering for world-wide missions, hence four dollars 
the'hearts and lives of father, mother and children; was raised. This was all done just as we passed the 
and, whatever else is lacking, there will be an atmos- south coast of Sardinia, about half way from Naples 
phere engendered in which every one loves to dwell, to Gibraltar. Our vessel has nearly her full capacity 
as birds do, in the quiet, sunny nooks of the forests, of passengers ; 2,023 steerage, 83 second-class. 41 first- 
There are homes where people are stern and harsh, class, and a crew of 236. Total. 2.383. We expect, 
yet some of the ruder virtues may be found. But if the good Lord will, to arrive in New York about 
the irresistible charm of a real home is lacking, Dec. 12. 
you miss the low voices and the easy courtesy of the November )0, 



An influence not only lives forever, but it keeps on 
growing as long as it lives. There never comes a time 
when it reaches its maturity and when its growth is 
arrested. The influence which you start into life to- 
day in the family, the neighborhood, or the social cir- 
cle, is perhaps very small now. very little cared for 
now ; but it will roll forward through the ages, grow- 
ing wider and deeper and stronger with every passing 
hour, and blighting or blessing as it rolls,— Christian 
Weekly. 






THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



YE ARE MY WITNESSES.— Luke 24: 48. 



BY C. H. BALSBAUGH. 

How dark, how dreary, how cold, how barren is 
life where there is no love. How bright, how sweet, 
how heavenly where love -reigns. In every heart 
where Jesus is enthroned, love dominates the entire 
being — mind, heart, tongue, hands, and feet. This is 
the great lesson God wants to teach us through the 
incarnation and sacrifice of his only Son. What slow, 
dull disciples we are. And the Holy Ghost is so 
ready and willing to teach us. And he has such 
glorious things to communicate. John 16: 13, 14, 15. 
All the fullness of the Godhead is at his disposal. 
Col. 2 : 9. Christ is the Father's witness. The Holy 
Ghost is Christ's witness. And we witness through 
the Spirit the beauty of Jesus. 

Religion means life — the very life of God : and God 
is love. This is the essence and totality of his being. 
This is all concentrated in him who is our example, 
our atonement, and our intercessor. Religion does 
not all evaporate in emotion. It is more than a shout, 
or vociferous alleluia. It is a divinely illuminated 
mind, a holy heart, a life running over with the love 
of God for the good of humanity. It is witnessing 
for Jesus that salvation is nothing less than God 
manifest in the flesh, revealing himself in all our 
words and works. It is all summed up in Gal. 2 : 20. 
Position, influence, fame, money, are all given to us 
as means for the promotion of God's glorious work 
in the redemption of man. The first, deepest, ruling 
thought of the Christian is, How can I do most good 
to my fellow-beings, and glorify my Lord and Savior? 
This low, mean, treacherous, God-deposing self must 
be utterly crucified, and have no more regnancy in our 
life. Daily we must be hammering the nails of the 
cross to bring us into perfect and blessed conformity 
to the crucified Godman. It can be done. It must be 
done. If Christ is in us it will be done. This, and 
only this, is salvation. 

If we " know Jesus, and the power of his resurrec- 
tion, and the fellowship of his sufferings," we will 
be a shining light, and a wise teacher, and a skillful 
worker, and win many souls into the kingdom of God. 
Philpp. 3:10: Matt." 5: 16; John 5:17, and 12:32. 
As Jesus is the revelation of the Father, so must we 
be transcripts of the Son. It is impossible for any 
soul to enshrine Jesus and not yearn for the salvation 
of the lost. The same love that brought Jesus from 
heaven to Bethlehem, to Gethsemane, to Calvary, is 
shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost. Rom. 
5:5. This fills and fires our missionaries, at home 
and abroad. This very day I received a letter from 
a brother who is all the year engaged in evangelistic 
work, whose heart seems to get every pulse straight 
from the heart of Jesus. Truly our labor is not in 
vain in the Lord. 1 Cor. 15:58. Let us prayerfully 
study this passage. It contains some of the most 
inspiring words in the vocabulary of grace. When 
the ledger of eternity is opened it will be verified. 
May the "mightily" of Col. 1:29 prevail in us all. 
Union Deposit, Pa. 



GOD IS WISDOM, GOD IS LOVE. 



BY IDA M. HELM. 

We make our plans, and with buoyant spirits we 
set about carrying them out. For awhile all goes well 
and it seems to us that our brightest hopes and our 
highest ambitions are about to be realized, then we 
begin to think, " What an important person I am ; 
how wisely I planned this work and how splendidly I 
am completing it." 

While we are thus musing upon our own greatness, 
suddenly the tall spires of our grand work ( ?) begin 
to topple and soon the whole structure comes tumbling 
in a heap at our feet. Then we wonder why fortune 
frowns on us so often and smiles on some one else 
that we have in our mind ; and we imagine that every- 
thing always goes in his favor. Thus, while prosperity 
lingers with us, we esteem ourselves very highly and 
claim much honor for ourselves ; but when adverse 
winds blow we try to shift the blame to fortune, and 
we say, " Fortune is always against us," 



True, some people do seem to have better success 
than others ; but perhaps we do not know what trials 
and disappointments they have met with, nor how 
often they have struggled with obstacles that seemed 
like impregnable barriers to the realization of their 
hopes: but, like Jacob of old, they wrestled on till 
they obtained the coveted prize. In that long night of 
struggle God was preparing Jacob for the work that 
was before him. No doubt in after years, when great 
trials came, he would think of the blessing he had 
received from his hard struggle with the strong 
power that night when his thigh was maimed. Then 
he felt that— 

" God is wisdom, God is love." 
It may be necessary that misfortune come to us 
sometimes ; perhaps we are trusting too mudi" in our 
own strength, and neglecting to honor the Master, and 
what we consider " hard luck " may be a blessing in 
disguise. God sometimes chastens his children, but 
he always does it in love and wisdom, and although we 
may wince and lament — 

" That gentle stroke may win us back- 
To our forgiving God." 

James says: "If any of you lack wisdom, let him 
ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and up- 
braideth not; and it shall be given him." Every good 
thing comes from God, and whether prosperity 
smiles, or adversity seems to frown on us, let us look 
up and say — 

" God is wisdom, God is love." 
R. D. 2, Ashland, Ohio. 



A LITTLE CHILD SHALL LEAD THEM. 



BY OMA KARN. 

God's Word bids us seek wisdom. Sometimes we 
find this wisdom in unexpected places. The following 
incident shows that quite often we find it taught by 
one of the best of teachers — a little child. 

Lyman is the little son of our earnest minister. 
When he was as yet a tiny lad an aunt made him a 
present of a little red Testament. The mother, like 
a mother of old, carefully instructed him in the teach- 
ings of the sacred Book. Especially did she seek 
to impress upon his mind the teaching of Ephesians 
6. Did this youthful Timothy show any signs of 
disobedience in any form, he was told to go and read 
that particular chapter ; and it was seldom that any 
more reproof was needed. 

One day recently — a day of trial and perplexities 
such as. come into the lives of all of us — the mother's 
patience had been severely tried, and under the stress 
of it she reproved the child for some slight fault with 
unnecessary severity. Quietly the little boy arose 
from his play, and going into another room soon re- 
turned with his little Testament. Gravely handing it 
to her, he said, " Mamma, wouldn't you feel better 
if you would read awhile in my little book ? " 

It is needless to say that mother learned a lesson 
that day. 

Covington, Ohio. 



THE MINISTER AND THE BIBLE. 



BY D. HAYS. 

It is not the man who has read many books that 
we fear to meet in debate, but the one who is well 
read in a few. The one Book for the minister is the 
Bible. It is not enough that he get in close touch 
with the Bible through other books ; he must make the 
Bible a part of himself. He must read it, study it, 
know it, feel it — his life-pulse must beat with it, and 
in it. When he speaks he must feel it pulsating 
through all his veins and arteries. He must have it 
at his fingers' ends for illustration ; in his heart for 
persuasion ; in his mind for conviction. 

There are helps to the study of the Bible, — a Bible 
dictionary, concordance, lexicon, and to the one who 
has studied the language, a Greek Testament and 
Lexicon, if he would drink at the fountain head. Then 
as an aid to a pure style the Bible language itself 
is simple enough, and broad enough, and high enough, 



for all classes. There is no historian equal to Moses; 
no poetry equal to Job's, David's, or Solomon's; no 
pathos equal to Judah's appeal to Joseph; no sermon 
equal to the Sermon on the Mount; no oration equal 
to Paul's at Athens. If you want to be a minister 
" that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the 
word of truth," you have nothing to fear, use the 
Bible. 
Broadway, ['a. 



WE DIE TO LIVE. 



We die with Jesus in baptism, and thereby unite 
with him in his attitude towards sin. This death with 
him, by symbol, covenants permanent relation with 
him as a principle whereby we are ever dead with 
Christ to sin. Union with him in his death is the 
necessary step towards union with Jesus in his resur- 
rection, wherein the "new creature" brought forth 
in us is united with the resurrected Jesus and has 
relation with him to his present glorified life as well 
as to heaven, the Father and all things eternal. 

No way is provided by which we may come into 
spiritual relation to Jesus resurrected without first 
coming into closest union and attitude with him, dead 
to sin, the flesh and the world. No cross, no crown, 
and life through death are fixed principles. Jesus led 
along this way, and we must follow to attain to life 
with him. 

McPherson, Kans. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TOPIC 



Sunday Evening. January 13, 1907. 



RISEN WITH CHRIST.— Eph. 2. 6. 

Though dead in sin, " quickened, "—made alive with 
Christ. Col. 2: 3. 

Dying brought suffering; this in turn brought its re- 
ward. 

Notice comes to each one who is" quickened. 

" We shall live with him." 2 Tim. 2: 11. 

We shall reign. 

"Live." 2 Tim. 2: 11. 

" Sit in heavenly places." Eph. 2: 6. 

" Rejoice." 1 Peter 4: 13. 

" Be joint heirs." Rom. 8: 17. 

■' Be glorified." Rom. 8: 17. 

"Be in glory." Col. 3: 4. 

" Reign." 2 Tim. 2: 12. 

As we have these assurances we may know we are 
risen with Christ. 

Old things are passed away; behold all things are new. 



PRAYER MEETING 



For Week Beginning January 13, 1907. 



' PROVE ME NOW, SAITH THE LORD OF HOSTS." 
Mai. 3: 10. 



I. God Wants Us to Prove Him. 

1. Wc need a blessing. Psn. 40: 4, " Blessed is the 
man that maketh the Lord his trust." Are we 
willing to put this matter to the test? We need 
not fear to exhaust his rich treasury. 
2. Precious promises are ours. 2 Peter 2: 9, "The 
Lord is not slack concerning his promises." He 
expects us to lay hold and enjoy every one of 
them. Trust, obey, and get the promised blessing. 
II. How Ought We to Prove Him? 

1. In prayer. There are special privileges at the 
throne of grace. Matt. 18: 19. There is comfort 
and power for every burdened soul. 

2. In faith. Our spiritual attainments are dependent 
on our faith. "According to your faith" will be 
the structure of our spiritual building. Matt. 9: 29. 
Well may we pray, " Lord, increase our faith! " 

3. Use every means of grace. Strength, power, abil- 
ity, Isa. 40: 29; 1 Peter 4: 11. Deliverance, Psa. 
18: 50. Peace, John 14: 27. 

4. Consecrate yourself to the Lord, with all you have 
.and are. Rom. 12: 1, 2. This means yourself, and 
also your possessions. 

III. The Result of Proving Him. 

1. Peace. Isa. 26: 3, "Thou wilt keep him in perfect 
peace, whose mind is stayed on thee; because he 
trusteth in thee." Peace is the Christian resting 
in the green pastures, reclining beside the still 
waters. 

2. Joy. Fullness of joy, 1 John 1: 4. Spiritual joy is 
love exulting. It is a surrendering of itself to 
bliss without foreboding, knowing that with Christ 
al! is well here and hereafter, 



UU 



ri-.jw- 



KlAWr^ 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



HOME AND FAMILY 

A NEW YEAR'S PRAYER. 



Of thee, dear Lord, I ask 

No tiling save this, 
In cacli appointed task 

To find hut bliss. 

Make thou my heart to sing 

With joy and be 
A lute whose every string 

Yields melody. 

Touch thou mine eyes to find 

Of life the best- 
Peace and companions kind, 

Labor and rest. 

Thine be the call to give 

Gladness each day; 
Lord, while 'tis mine to live, 

For this I pray. 

Keep thou my courage strong; 

My hopes keep high; 
So shall I live like song 

And like song, die. 

— Frank Dempster Sherman. 



THE PALACE WITHOUT A CARE. 



BY ELIZABETH D. ROSENBERGER. 

When Frederick the Great wished to escape from 
the burdens and anxieties of state into the care-free 
atmosphere of private life, he went to Sans-Souci, the 
palace without care, as its name signifies. The palace 
is beautiful within and without. In one room the 
floor is so exquisitely polished that visitors are re- 
quired to put on soft slippers over their boots before 
they are permitted to walk across it to examine the 
rare china which it contains. Very beautiful is the 
park of Sans-Souci with its great beds of forget-me- 
nots and lilies of the valley and the songs of innu- 
merable birds. Splendid fountains, deep green bowers, 
with statuary gleaming whitely in its shady recesses, 
make of this place a paradise. And we can imagine 
the king coming here and trying to shut out care and 
sorrow from this palace. 

Can your home be called a palace without a care ? 
No, I am sure it does not deserve that title. Yet so 
far as we can we should banish care and unhappiness 
from our homes. The burdens of this twentieth cen- 
tury civilization rest heavily upon us. Household 
cares are many and mother is the toiling, watching, 
unwearied dispenser of comforts and blessings to 
those about her. Some say that the women of to-day 
lack the sturdy heroism of our grandmothers. We 
admire the stout-hearted pioneer woman of a hundred 
years ago, but she was no nobler than the woman 
of to-day. Her life was not so full of care, her prob- 
lems were less complex than, those which confront 
us. How shall we simplify our manner of living; and 
how shall we redeem the time that we may have more 
leisure for the sweet and simple pleasures of home 
life? Very often the struggle to have things better 
than our neighbors makes a show-place of our homes 
—a palace indeed, but a palace with many cares. In 
the struggle sometimes debts are contracted and men 
of reputed honesty rush into transactions which bring 
a shadow upon their names. Not in this way can be 
found a palace without a care. 

Shall we strive for social position and favor at the 
cost of a quiet and peaceful home life ? No, we can- 
not afford this; neither can we regulate our lives by 
what people say ; because the opinion of our neighbors 
has really no bearing on the things in our individual 
life that are worth while. Let us not overdo things, 
nor overcrowd our homes with useless furnishings, 
but let us make our lives simple and honest and satis- 
fying to our highest ideals. This is the first step 
toward making home a palace without a care. Then 
let gentleness pervade the atmosphere, let it shine from 
the hearts and lives of father, mother and children ; 
and, whatever else is lacking, there will be an atmos- 
phere engendered in which every one loves to dwell, 
as birds do, in the quiet, sunny nooks of the forests. 
There are homes where people are stern and harsh, 
yet some of the ruder virtues may be found. But 
the irresistible charm of a real home is lacking; 
you miss the low voices and the easy courtesy of the 



home where gentleness rules, where an uplifted 
finger, a softly spoken reproof in the next room will 
do what scolding and whipping fail to bring about 
in other homes. When father has had a hard, 
difficult day in the office, the light in the window 
beckons him to a place of quiet and rest. If the home 
is a farmhouse, and the fanner has been hard at work 
until an aching back and limbs make him long for 
rest, the clean kitchen and loving welcome make of his 
home the dearest place on earth. When the children 
come to father to show him what progress they have 
made in their lessons, when they talk over the won- 
derful events that took place in school that day ; when 
the little one in the first grade exhibits his drawings 
with pride; when the children find something to do 
all the evening, and none of them are away from 
home ; such a home comes nearer being a palace with- 
out a care than the one at Sans-Souci. 

We woiTy too much. That some men have died of 
overwork is no doubt true, but this does not alter 
the fact that work pure and simple is the rarest of 
all rare causes of death. It is the worry which goes 
with the work that causes death. We may not under- 
stand the process by which worry undermines the 
general health, induces disease of the heart or the 
arteries, or kills a man before his time ; but that it 
does do these things is a fact only too well established. 
Women grow wrinkled and old long before their time 
because they take such anxious thought for the 
morrow. No one who is not given to worry can 
conceive of the power which the habit gains over its 
victim. He will admit that it is wrong, but he cannot 
help himself ; it is almost impossible to break the habit. 
We desire greatly to possess something, and in striving 
to gratify that desire we waste so much time by 
worrying that fulfillment is delayed. Home is full 
of care, where this harassing anxiety and impatient 
expectation holds sway. And if we measure life by its 
yield of contentment, inspiration and usefulness, those 
who worry fall below the standard. 

But, however carefully we avoid worry, and toil and 
plan for happier homes, there is not one from which 
care. and sorrow can be debarred. They enter and 
confront us; then we must battle against them as best 
we may. God has placed us here to ameliorate the 
hard conditions, to widen sympathies, to make more 
beautiful this world-home of ours. Only as trouble 
and care have come into our own lives can we sym- 
pathize with others, and that may be the cause for 
our light afflictions. Then, if we patiently persist in 
doing our duty as we, should, in loving others as we 
are commanded, when we reach the home prepared for 
us beyond, we shall find that we have entered a 
veritable palace without care, one in which there is 
neither sorrow nor crying nor any pain, for God him- 
self shall wipe all tears from their eyes. " Happiness 
is a great love and much serving." 

"Though earth has full many a beautiful spot 
As a poet or painter might show, 
Yet more lovely and beautiful, holy and bright, 
To the hopes of the heart and the spirit's glad sight, 
Is the land that no mortal may know." 

Covington, Ohio. 



A NEW YEAR'S REMINDER. 



THANKSGIVING ON THE MEDITERRANEAN. 



BY S. M. GOUGHNOUR. 

Nov. 29th being Thanksgiving Day in our home- 
land, we felt then we should observe it, even if we 
were on the Great Sea. Hence, at 8 P. M., by per- 
mission of the captain, we held our meeting in the 
dining room. It was decided that all who wished 
should have an opportunity to speak. Nearly all of 
us had a few remarks to make, the writer being called 
on to open the exercises. We felt that we had a good 
meeting. We felt, too, we ought to make a little 
offering for world-wide missions, hence four dollars 
was raised. This was all done just as we passed the 
south coast of Sardinia, about half way from Naples 
to Gibraltar. Our vessel has nearly her full capacity 
of passengers ; 2,023 steerage, 83 second-class, 41 first- 
class, and a crew of 236. Total, 2,383. We expect, 
if the good Lord will, to arrive in New York about 
Dec. 12. 

November 30, 



The season's joy you wish us — 

.For that we thank you, dear; 
Yet wishes are not quite enough 

To bring a glad New Year. 

Watch day by day, my darling, 

For helpful work to do, 
And through the new year you yourself 

Will make your wish come true. 

—Mary F.Butts. 

AID SOCIETY, LOON CREEK CHURCH, SALA- 
MONIA CONGREGATION, INDIANA. 



Our society was organized March IS, 1906, and up 
until Dec. 19 we held eighteen meetings, with an 
average attendance of eight. Our work consisted of 
piecing quilts and comfort tops; we completed two 
quilts and one comforter; made three little dresses 
and two aprons, etc., to which were added a number 
of articles donated, girls' jackets, boys' coats, vests 
and pants, also ten yards of outing, all of which were 
sent to the Mexico, Ind., Orphanage, for Christmas 
gifts. Amount of money received during the year was 
$14.23; amount paid out, $10.90, leaving a balance of 
$3.3i in the treasury. We realize our efforts are weak, 
yet we feel that some little good is being done. — Mary 
A. Shideler, Sec, Huntington, Ind., R. F. D. 5, Dec. 
22 



SISTERS' MISSION CIRCLE, COON RIVER 
CHURCH, PANORA, IOWA. 



Our Sisters' Mission Circle held thirteen meetings 
during the six months ending Dec. 20, 1906, with an 
average attendance of seventeen. We received as 
donations, and for work, $57.72 ; our expenses were 
$54.58. During this time we quilted four quilts; 
knotted seven comforts, made new garments, pieced 
quilt patches, and sewed several pounds of carpet rags. 
We sent forty-eight pieces of clothing and $5 to Des 
Moines, Iowa, mission; thirty-nine pieces and $5 to 
the Christian Home at Council Bluffs, Iowa, and 
nineteen pieces of clothing, two pairs of shoes and 
$5 to the Chicago mission. We also donated $5 to 
the poor at home. — Sister Eva Fiscel, Supt. ; Sister 
Florence Long, Sec, Box 224, Panora, Iowa, Dec 21. 



SISTERS' AID SOCIETY, SALAMONIA, INDIANA. 



Since December, 1905, we have held twelve regular 
meetings, besides several called meetings, with an 
average attendance of sixteen. At our last meeting 
we reorganized, and decided to send a box, containing 
forty-eight garments and three new comforters, to the 
Chicago missions. During the last year we received 
$3.50 for quilting; $6 for comforters sold; $5.27 as 
collection, making a total of $14.77. Our expenses 
were $11.75, leaving in the treasury $9.67, including 
$6.65 in the treasury at the beginning of the year. 
We earnestly pray the Lord to bless us and give us 
all strength that we may do more during the coming 
year. — Dessie Heaston, Sec, Salamonia, Ind., Dec. 18. 



PASADENA, CAL., AID SOCIETY. 



Some months ago the sisters of the Pasadena, Cal., 
church organized an Aid Society. We have had an 
average attendance of seven. We have been quilting 
and sewing for others, making aprons, etc. 

At the Thanksgiving collection we gave $5 for 
mission work and recently another $5 to the Chicago 
mission. It only shows that even a few willing 
workers can accomplish something for the Lord's 
work. — Elizabeth M. Weiler, Sec. 



An influence not only lives forever, but it keeps on 
growing as long as it lives. There never comes a time 
when it reaches its maturity and when its growth is 
arrested. The influence which you start into life to- 
day in the family, the neighborhood, or the social cir- 
cle, is perhaps very small now, very little cared for 
now ; but it will roll forward through the ages, grow- 
ing wider and deeper and stronger with every passing 
hour, and blighting or blessing as it rolls, — Christian 
Weekly, 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



THE GOSPEL 

A 



MESSENGER 



RELIGIOUS WEEKLY 

PUBLISHED BY 

Brethren Publishing House 

Publishing agent 

The General Missionary and Tract Committee, 

22 and 24 South State Street, Elgin, III. 



Bro. D. W. Crist, of Mound City, Mo., who has 
been holding revival services ill Ohio since October, 
called at the Messenger office on his way home. This 
was his first visit to the Brethren Publishing- House. 



SUBSCRIPTION, 



$1.50 PER ANNUM, IN ADVANCE 



D. L. Miller, minors, 
H. B. BRUMBAUGH, Pn. 
H. C. Early. Virginia, 



bh 



] J. H. Moore, 

Grant Mahan 
I R. 1'. A&KOLD. 



Office Editor 

Associate Editor 

Business Manairei 



Advisory 
Yearout. Geo. 



Committee, 

S. Arnold. P. R. Keltner. 



Bro. Walter Barnhart, who recently closed his 
labors with the church at Huntington, Ind., is at this 
time engaged in a series of meetings at the Union 
Center house near Nappanee. He reports a good 
interest. He is to conduct another meeting, for the 
same congregation, in the West house. In the course 
of a few weeks he is to move to Minneapolis, Minn., 
to take charge of the work in that city. 



Bro. L. T. Holsinger spent four weeks in a series 
of meetings in the Upper Fall Creek church, Indiana. 
Six made the good confession and were baptized, and 
one was restored to fellowship. 

One of our brethren in middle life, and engaged in 
active business pursuits, is greatly pleased with what 
was said last week under the heading " No Good-bye." 
He says : " I hope to reach a good old age and be a 



constant reader of the 
on this grand old earth. 



Messenger until my last day 



Bro. H. M. Barwick closed a 
Burroak. Kans.. with ten accessions 



Bro. A. C. Daggett held a revival 
Kans., and six put on Christ in baptism, 
are to be baptized later. 

Since the last report from Wichita, Kans., 
have been added to the church by confession 
baptism. One applicant still awaits the rite. 



at Quinter, 
Four others 



five 
and 



Next week we are to publish the queries, sent by 
recent district meetings to the Annual Conference. 
We suggest that they receive a careful reading. 



The Brethren at McPherson, Kans., begin their 
special Bible Institute Jan. 20, to continue at least 
one week. Bro. A. C. Wieand is to be with them part 
of the time. 



Bro. Daniel Whitmer writes us that he is en- 
gaged in a well-attended series of meetings at 
Wenatchee, Wash., where he finds the church in fine 
working order. 

Bro. David Rowland, elder of the Shannon church. 
Illinois, accompanied by his family, started to Cali- 
fornia two weeks ago for the purpose of spending the 
winter on the Pacific coast. 



Some time ago, in an item on the first page of the 
Messenger, reference was made to Mr. Lovejoy of 
the National Child Labor Committee. One of our 
readers asked for his address, Which we were unable 
to give at the time. As the letter is not at hand we 
state here that the address is Owen R. Lovejoy, 287 
Fourth Avenue, New York City. 



Under date of Dec. 25, Bro. L. H. Eby, of Fort 
Wayne, Ind., writes us from Memphis, Tenn., saying: 
" I am this far on my way to Roanoke, La., where 
I hope to attend the Sunday-school, ministerial antl 
district meetings Dec. 26, 27, 28, a feast on the 29th, 
then open with a series of meetings and Bible study. 
I find beautiful weather, no snow." 



Bro. J. G. Royer is very much interested in the 
suggestions of Bro. M. G. Brumbaugh regarding the 
approaching bicentennial of the Brethren church. He 
thinks that the incident ought not to pass by without 
some suitable notice on our part. It is believed that 
we should do something special in 1908 to bring our 
claims more fullv before the world. Possibly there 
are others who are also interested. 



|y~Atl business and communications intended for the paper should, 
be addressed to Uie BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE. ELGIN, ILL. 
and not to any individual connected with it 



Entered at the Post Office at Elgin. HI., as Second-class Matter. 

Bro. Samuel Weimer, of Jerico Springs, Mo., 
should now be addressed at Bower Mills, same State. 



good meeting at 
all young people. 



Under date of Dec. 10, Bro. W. R. Miller writes 
us from Smyrna, Asia Minor, saying that thus far 
his trip has been exceedingly pleasant and satisfactory. 
With his party he was to remain in Asia Minor until 
Dec. 20, and then. move on to Palestine, where several 
weeks are to be devoted to a careful study of the 
Holy Land. He promises us some interesting articles 
for the Messenger, and some of them are to be accom- 
panied by rare and instructive illustrations. 



During a series of meetings at the County Line 
church, Ohio, sixteen came out on the Lord's side and 
were baptized. 



Bro. Ira. P. Eby, who has for several years been 
engaged in mission work in Southeastern Missouri, 
has arranged to go to Cuba and do what he can to 
build up the cause of Christ on that island. There are 
probably others who are looking in the same direction 
and in due time will locate. We already have two 
ministers in Cuba and at no distant day ought to have 
a score of them and half 
churches. 



many well-equipped 



During the holidays Bro. J. E. Miller, of Mt. Mor- 
ris College, conducted a well-attended Bible Institute in 
the Waddams Grove church, 111. The course of study 
was well arranged for a country congregation. In 
fact it would suit the conditions in any of our churches. 
We like these programs that signify something and 
give a clear gospel ring. There is a growing dis- 
position to interpret what the Bible says so as to 
fit everybody and hit nobody. When Christ and the 
apostles taught the people there was a stir in the com- 
munity. We like the idea of those, who conduct 
Bible Institutes, getting back to the old apostolic doc- 
trine, methods and simplicity. 



Hereafter the General Missionary Committee is to 
meet three times each year. The first meeting for 
1907 will be held at Elgin the third Wednesday of 
April, and the next meeting in August. No arrange- 
ments have been made for a session in Los Angeles 
during the Conference. A meeting of the Board on 
that occasion will probably depend upon the number 
of members who happen to be present. 

Writing from Durham, Okla., Dec. 26, Bro. A. W. 
Austin says that he is holding meetings among the 
dug-outs. He preached two sermons in a schoolhouse, 
and it was well filled. He thinks our opportunity to 
do good in that locality is not as encouraging as it 
was a few years ago. Most of the men have become 
members of secret orders and seem to be contented 
with what little religion may be found in the lodges. 



Christmas, at Elgin, was a very enjoyable day. 
The services at the church were conducted by those in 
charge of our Sunday-school work. The large 
audience room was well-filled by the children, their 
parents and others. There were also a number of 
members present from other localities and we were 
glad to have them with us. It is good to now and then 
turn a service of this sort over to the Sunday-school' 
workers. It proves helpful to them as well as helpful 
to the cause they represent. A number of the children 
took part in this Christmas service and we feel sure 
that it did them good. The visitors as well as the 
home members enjoyed the exercises of the hour. 



The University of Virginia, where Bro. J. W. Way- 
land is doing some work, is sending Dr. Adrian S. 
Taylor, as its representative to be a medical missionary 
in China. This means that the University will enter 
the mission field with a view of helping the people 
of the Celestial Empire to something higher and better 
than what they have heretofore known. It is be- 
lieved that this may prompt other educational institu- 
tions to undertake a similar work. The Chinese need 
a better religion, better mental training, and more 
medical attention. With them the care of the body, 
education and Christianity go well together. The 
doctor, the school-teacher and the missionary make a 
fine trio in heathen lands. 



In tire Christian Workers' meetings last Sunday 
evening, in all parts of the Brotherhood, China, a; 
a prospective mission field, was the subject for con- 
sideration. At Elgin a number of interesting and 
helpful talks were made by the different speakers. 
Something was said about the vast empire, the age of 
the country and the four hundred millions of people 
represented by the one government. Then, there were 
talks about the religion of the Chinese, their customs 
and the probable future of the empire. Meetings of 
this kind do young people good. They not only inspire 
them but help them to information that is certain to 
prove beneficial in years to come. It is probably safe 
to say that our people, the United States over, learned 
some things about China last Sunday that will not 
soon be forgotten. 



The demand for our premium book " The Other 
Half of the Globe," has been so great that we find it 
necessary to print another large edition. The edition 
printed was unusually large for the first one, and it 
now looks as though we may need as many books to 
fill the future orders as it has required to fill those 
received in the past. We are receiving from three 
hundred to six hundred letters a day right along, and 
this means hundreds of orders for the book. We are 
glad for the great and even growing demand for the 
work. It shows that our people want good reading 
matter, and that they are satisfied with the most ex- 
cellent terms on which the premium book may be 
had. In this connection we call special attention to 
the advertisement on the last page of this issue. 



Sister Marguerite Bixler writes us from her 
home at East Akron, Ohio, saying that she enjoyed 
her recent trip in the New Testament lands immensely. 
She went from place to place with an open Bible and 
also an open song book. As she visited places of 
interest she read what the Bible had to say about 
them, and then, inspired by the sacred associations 
experienced by the Christian traveler in this country, 
she sang the sweet songs of Zion on the mountain 
tops as well as in the valleys. But she is now in her 
home land again. To her the Bible is a new book, and 
the songs of Zion contain new beauties. With in- 
creased inspiration and with enlarged views of the 
land of the Sacred Story she is ready to go among the 
churches and aid them in their song services. She 
once said that she made it her business to sing people 
into the church. 



The General Mission Board has considered and 
acted on the advisability of having some of our doc- 
trinal tracts translated into one of the languages of ■ 
India, and see to it that they are well distributed. The 
Board believes in thoroughly indoctrinating the con- 
verts of India, as well as those made in other lands. 
This can be clone by a wise use of tracts as well as 
in other ways. In most mission fields doctrine is a 
secondary consideration, but our people believe this 
class of teaching must have all due attention. When 
the apostles went among the heathen preaching the 
Gospel, the doctrine of the New Testament was by- 
no means overlooked. To carry out the wishes of 
the Board, Brethren J. M. Blough, W. B. Stover and 
Sister Eliza B. Miller have been appointed a Com- 
mittee on Translation, Publication and Distribution, 
and an appropriation has been made to defray the 
expenses. This is a good move upon the part of the 
Board. 



DOING OUR BEST. 



When we enter a year we can never tell what.it 
lias in store for us. nor can we know whether we 
shall sec the end of it. , We live but one minute at 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 8, 1907. 






a time, and on rising' in the morning iiave at our 
disposal only the one day. Realizing this, our pur- 
pose should be to begin the year well and then do out- 
best every minute, as the minutes are dealt out to us. 
A public speaker, who is making quite a success in 
his way, once told us that in his addresses he does 
his very best on each point as he comes to it. lie 
never slights one part of his discourse for the pur- 
pose of doing better on some other part. His best 
is done from start to finish. 

This might well be our policy during the year that 
we have just entered. Each day should have the best 
efforts of our hearts, and hands. Each day will of 
course bring its duties, and these should have our 
attention for the day. These duties will differ the 
one from the Other as the days may differ, but no 
duty should be neglected on account of the duties of 
the morrow. He who does his work well to-day will 
be in better condition for the labors and the efforts of 
the morrow. 

For years it has been our policy to fill each issue of 
the Messenger with the very best matter on hand at 
the time of handing out the copy, keeping in mind, 
of course, the necessity of variety. By thus doing we 
can feel that we are giving our patrons the best every 
week in the year. Instead of placing the largest and 
ripest berries on top, as fruit venders often do, we 
pick out the best fruits and fill the measure, and then 
endeavor to do even better the next time. 

This is to be our policy for the year 1907. Last 
year we gave our readers the very best spiritual viands 
within our reach. This we did week after week. We 
are not much for making promises, but it now looks 
as though the Messenger patrons are going to be 
favored with the finest assortment of articles ever 
sent out from the Brethren Publishing House. We 
have some of these articles on hand, others are in 
course of preparation and still more have been 
promised by good thinkers, who know how to place 
their views on paper in good, readable form. B\ 
doing our very best for our patrons each week we 
fondly hope to give them, for 1907, the very best 
volume of the Gospel Messenger yet published. We 
certainly shall not be content to fall below the record 
for previous years. 

Might it not be well for our preachers to give their 
congregations during the year, the very best sermons 
they can prepare and deliver? This they can do by 
doing their very best each time they attempt to address 
the public. If the two thousand active preachers in 
the Brotherhood will give their congregations their 
very best each week, what a power for good they will 
become ! 

Then we have in the United States and Canada about 
one thousand Sunday schools, and most of them are 
well officered. By all of these officers endeavoring to 
do their very best each Sunday they will accomplish 
still more good, in the way of converting young people, 
planting the seed of the kingdom in the hearts of others 
and making the world better than even the two thou- 
sand active ministers. 

Think also of the one hundred thousand members 
of the Brethren church trimming their lamps and let- 
ting their light shine better than it ever shone before ! 
1 hink of the one hundred thousand devout men and 
women, young and old, doing their very best to live 
the Christ life! Think of such an army of earnest, 
intelligent and consecrated workers, extending from 
the Atlantic to the Pacific, all engaged in their Father'; 
business, letting their light shine, living the Christ life 
and doing their very utmost to save a lost world ! 

May it be the purpose of all of us to do our best 
for Christ and the church during the year 1907. We 
should do our best every hour, every day and every 
week. Then, when the last day of the year comes, 
we can look back over the months gone by and say: 
" I have done my best for the cause of my Master : 
I have fought a good fight ; 1 have kept the faith, and 
I now am ready to enter the year 1908, the long-looked- 
for bicentennial of the Brotherhood, and do still better 
work than has been done in the past." With all of this, 
and even more in contemplation, may it be our fixed 
purpose to do our best as the days and weeks of 1907 
come and go. 



ELDER G. J. FERCKEN. 



THE HUMDRUM OF LIFE. 



It is with much regret that we announce to the 
readers of the Messenger the withdrawal of Elder 
Fercken from the fellowship of the Brethren church 
for the purpose of uniting with the Swedenborg 
Society. 

In a recent letter he has this to say: " After several 
days of inward struggle and keen, poignant anguish, 
accompanied with much prayer for guidance, I have 
finally decided to totally withdraw from the Brethren 
church with which I am no more in sympathy as to 
doctrine, rites and ordinances. It gives me much pain 
to leave a church where I have always been well 
treated, which loved me and trusted me and for which 
I have given the best years of my life. I am afraid 
I have not done as well as I could, but in the presence 
of trying difficulties and experiences I constantly met 
I did wdiat I could ... I wish you would 
convey to the whole brotherhood my regrets and the 
assurance of my lasting affection." 

For several years it has been known that Elder 
Fercken was to some extent interested in the mystic 
philosophy of Swedenborg. Over two years ago he 
began .writing on the subject and had published a 
small work on the subject under a nom de plume. 
When our brethren Miller and Trout and their com- 
pany visited the mission two years ago, Elder Fercken 
then said he had lost all interest in the subject, that 
he had dropped it and would have nothing more to do 
with it. At the same time, and frequently since then, 
he declared himself to be in full sympathy with the 
faith and practice of the Brethren church. But it 
seems that he did not drop the philosophy of the 
Swede and the result has been as stated in the quota- 
tion from his letter. 

About the first of November last, he left France on 
his way Jp the island of Mauritius, five hundred miles 
east of Madagascar, in the Indian Ocean, where he is 
to take charge of a French-speaking society of the 
people with whom he has cast his lot. 

Brethren Miller, Ziegler, Click and Guthrie, who are 
now traveling in the East, visited Geneva and Mon- 
treal by authority of the General Missionary Com- 
mittee and carefully looked after the needs of the 
mission. Elder Fercken had gone before their arrival. 
Brother Adrian Pellet, a minister in the second degree, 
was placed in charge of the work for the present, and 
the Orphanage at Montreal, France, was closed, the 
children taken to Geneva and placed under the care 
of Brother and Sister Pellet. As soon as it can be 
done an American brother will be sent to Geneva, and 
the work so well begun in France and Switzerland 
will be carried forward, under God's blessing, to 
success. 

Altogether not far from one hundred have been 
baptized since the mission opened, and at one time it 
had the promise of great success. The desertion of 
the elder in charge will doubtless hinder the work 
temporarily, but being the Lord's work it does not- 
depend on any one man or set of men. It will be 
continued and carried forward to success in the name 
of the Master. 

Of Elder Fercken we have no criticism or unkind 
word to offer. It is believed that while he was with 
us he did what he could. He has his strength and 
weaknesses, and in this he does not differ from most 
men. When he was no longer in sympathy with the 
church he quietly withdrew and for this he is to be 
commended. Of one thing we feel sure, that no matter 
where he may spend the few years he yet has to live 
he will never find more love and confidence than was 
given him by the Brethren church. Neither do we 
believe that the mystic philosophy of the great Swede 
will satisfy his soul yearnings as does the simple faith 
in Jesus as the Savior of the world. Other men have 
come to the church and left her communion but she 
has gone on in her efforts to re-establish primitive 
Christianity. For- a brief moment a slight ripple has 
been raised and then the name becomes a mere memory 
to die out and be forgotten in a very few years. The 
work of the Lord goes on as if they had never lived, 

D. L. M, 



I he other morning, as we walked out, we noticed 
a horse hitched to a post. After thinking for a moment 
we remembered that for a long time, every morning, 
the same horse stood there hitched to this same post. 
And then we were made to think of the man who 
hitched him there and of the life that he was living. 
Every morning he comes to this same place for the 
same purpose. How common such a round of life 
must become. And why does he do it? It is part 
of his life. It means his bread and butter, his clothes, 
his home and the feeding and clothing of his children. 
And then another thought came to us, Why does this 
man live ? To repeat over and over again the same old 
routine of doing! Will there be an end to the rope or 
a gap in the circle? 

As we look at the picture it becomes painfully un- 
pleasant and we were reminded of the ox at the water- 
drawing wheel on the banks of the Nile, in Egypt. 
Tramp, tramp, and round and round goes the ox from 
early morn to the dusky evening to lie down, rest and 
eat his provender that he may resume the same hum- 
drum stepping on the morrow, and on the morrow, 
until the joints stiffen and the knees refuse to bend. 
Is this life? And if so, what kind of a life is it? 
Here are two lives running in the same groove. The 
one we call the ox life and the other the man life. 
Are they different, and if so in what does the difference 
consist ? 

But after further thought, the question comes : Why 
ask about a difference? Is not all life much after 
the same order ? Our sympathy went out toward this 
man and his horse because of the seeming repetition, 
making the same circle and ending at the same post. 
.But as we think of it he is not the only man that 
revolves in circles, moves in cogs and makes the same 
ending. We know of housewives who have been keep- 
ing house, cooking meals, washing, mending, etc., 
during a half century or more — from girlhood through 
womanhood on to old age. Men farm and farm during 
their whole lifetime, plow, sow, harvest and gather, 
year after year, practically the same kind of work, 
making the same rounds and ending up at the same 
post. The same is true of the mechanic, the merchant 
and the professionals. All move in their respective 
circles, to end up at the same post. 

As we put the feed-and-clothe idea into life — and 
this alone — what a monotonous thing we make of it? 
How humdrum life does seem. We always opposed 
keeping the caged singing bird in our house. En- 
slaving a life was always unpleasant to us. The flying 
up against the cage and beating its wings against its 
sides always grated in our ears and destroyed the 
sweetest strains of music which the bird might sing 
during the intervals from struggle. But how much 
better off are men and women if tethered to posts and 
rounded within circles? And in a sense, so we are and 
so we do. This is especially true if eating, clothing, 
home-making and perpetuating our kind are the chief 
objects for which we are living, as with too many of 
us this seems to be. 

This thought brings up the question, Can we throw 
a purpose within these rounds and circles that is not 
of them or related to them, but that is outside of and 
beyond them ? Yes, we are more than oxen, or at 
least should be. We do not live to eat and wear 
clothes. We eat and wear clothes that we may live 
as God would have us live and do. 

We are slaves in the humdrum of life because of 
our wrong notions and purposes of life. It is right 
and proper that we should provide food to eat, clothes 
to wear and homes in which to live ; yet this is not 
the purpose for which God placed us here, or the 
mission unto which we have been called. 

Mary, no doubt, enjoyed homelife. She cooked, 
ate and had regard to comeliness and propriety in her 
dressing and general appearance. But when Jesus 
came to visit at their home she made all these things 
subservient to the higher purpose in her life. Martha 
may have excelled her sister in culinary adeptness 
because these things had a greater place in her pur- 
pose in life. It is just possible that these two sisters 
were equally devoted to their home work. But the 
pne made it an en4 in life, while the other made it 



J 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER 

A RELIGIOUS WEEKLY 

PUBLISHED BY 

Brethren Publishing House 

Publishing Agent 

The General Missionary and Tract Committee, 

22 and 24 south State Street, Elgin, III. 



SUBSCRIPTION. 



$1.50 PER ANNUM, IN ADVANCE 



O. L. Miller. Illinois, 
H. B. Brumracgh, Pa.. 
H. c Early. virfilnJa. 



I I. H. MOORR. 



Advisory Committee, 
M. YearouL Geo. S. Arnold. P. 



Office Editor 

I ~ — «... Associate Editor 

I R, E- Arxold. Busiaess Man ager 



as Second-class Hatter. 



t*"AIl business and communications intended for the paper should 
De addressed to the BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGLN tit, 
and not to any individual connected with it 

Entered at t he Post Office at Klein. 111. 

Bro. Samuel Weimeh, of Jerico Springs, Mo.. 
should now be addressed at Bower Mills, same State. 

Bro. H. M. Barwick closed a good meeting at 
Burroak, Kans., with ten accessions; all young people. 

During a series of meetings at the County Line 
church, Ohio, sixteen came out on the Lord's side and 
were baptized. 

Bro. A. C. Daggett held a revival at Quinter, 
Kans.. and six put on Christ in baptism. Four others 
are to be baptized later. - 

Since the last report from Wichita, Kans., five 
have been added to the church by confession and 
baptism. One applicant still awaits the rite. 

Next week we are to publish the queries, sent by 
recent district meetings to the Annual Conference 
U e suggest that they receive a careful reading. 

The Brethren at McPherson, Kans., begin their 
special Bible Institute Jan. 20, to continue at least 
one week. Bro. A. C. Wieand is to be with them part 
of the time. 



Bro. D. W. Crist, of Mound City, Mo., who has 
been holding revival services in Ohio since October, 
called at the Messenger office on his way home. This 
was his first visit to the Brethren Publishing House. 

Bro. Walter Barnhart, who recently closed his 
labors with the church at Huntington, Intl., is at this 
time engaged in a series of meetings at the Union 
Center house near Nappanee. He reports a good 
interest. He is to conduct another meeting, for the. 
same congregation, in the West house. In the course 
of a few weeks he is to move to Minneapolis, Minn.., 
to take charge of the work in that city. 

Under date of Dec. 10, Bro. W. R. Miller writes 
us from Smyrna, Asia Minor, saying that thus far 
his trip has been exceedingly pleasant and satisfactory. 
With his party he was to remain in Asia Minor until 
Dec. 20, and then. move on to Palestine, where several 
weeks are to be devoted to a careful study of the 
Holy Land. He promises us some interesting articles 
for the Messenger, and some of them are to be accom- 
panied by rare and instructive illustrations. 



Bro. L. T. Holsinger spent four weeks in a series 
of meetings in the Upper Fall Creek church, Indiana 
Six made the good confession and were baptized and 
one was restored to fellowship. 



One of our brethren in middle life, and engaged in 
active business pursuits, is greatly pleased with what 
was said last week under the heading " No Good-bye " 
He says.- " I hope to reach a good old age and be a 
constant reader of the Messenger until my last dav 
on this grand old earth." 



Bro. Daniel Whit.mer writes us that he is en- 
gaged ,n a well-attended series of meetings at 
U enatchee. Wash., where he finds the church in fine 
working order. 



Bro. David Rowland, elder of the Shannon church 
Illinois, accompanied by his family, started to Cali- 
fornia two weeks ago for the purpose of spending the 
winter on the Pacific coast. 



During the holidays Bro. J. E. Miller, of Mt. Mor- 
ris College, conducted a well-attended Bible Institute in 
the Waddams Grove church, III. The course of study 
was well arranged for a country congregation. In 
tact it would suit the conditions in any of our churches 
We like these programs that signify something and 
give a clear gospel ring. There is a growing dis- 
position to interpret what the Bible says so as to 
ht everybody and hit nobody. When Christ and the 
apostles taught the people there was a stir in the com- 
munity. We like the idea of those, who conduct 
Bible Institutes, getting back to the old apostolic doc- 
trine, methods and simplicity. 

Christmas, at Elgin, was a very enjoyable day 
1 he services at the church were conducted by those in 
charge of our Sunday-school work. The laro- e 
audience room was well-filled by the children, their 
parents and others. There were also a number of 
members present from other localities and we were 
glad to have them with us. It is good to now and then 
turn a service of this sort over to the Sunday-school' 
workers. It proves helpful to them as well as helpful 
to the cause they represent. A number of the children 
took part in this Christmas service and we feel sure 
that it did them good. The visitors as well as the 
home members enjoyed the exercises of the hour 



Hereafter the General Missionary Committee is to 
meet three times each year. The first meeting for 
190/ will be held at Elgin the third Wednesday of 
April, and the next meeting- in August. No arrange- 
ments have been made for a session in Los Angeles 
during the Conference. A meeting of the Board on 
that occasion will probably depend upon the number 
of members who happen to be present. 

Writing from Durham, Okla., Dec. 26, Bro A W 
Austin says that he is holding meetings among the 
dug-outs. He preached two sermons in a sehoolhouse 
and it was well filled. He thinks our opportunity to 
do good in that locality is not as encouraging as it 
was a few years ago. Most of the men have become 
members of secret orders and seen, to be contented 
with what little religion may be found in the lodges. 

The University of Virginia, where Bro. J. W. Way- 
land is doing some work, is sending Dr Adrian S 
Taylor, as its representative to be a medical missionary 
m Lhma. This means that the University will enter 
the mission field with a view of helping the people 
of the Celestial Empire to something higher and better 
ban what they have heretofore known. It is be- 
lieved that this may prompt other educational institu- 
tions to undertake a similar work. The Chinese need 
a better religion, better mental training, and more 
medical attention. With them the care of the body 
education and Christianity go well together The 
doctor, the school-teacher and the missionary make a 
line trio in heathen lands. 



Some time ago. in an item on the first page of the 
-Messenger, reference was made to Mr. Lovejoy of 
the National Child Labor Committee. One of our 
readers asked for his address, which we were unable 
to give at the time. As the letter is not at hand we 
state here that the address is Owen R. Lovejov 287 
bourth Avenue, New York City. 

Under date of DecT^TBroTL. H. Eby, of Fort 
Wayne, hid., writes us from Memphis, Tenn., savin-- 
1 am this far on my way to Roanoke, La., where 
I hope to attend the Sunday-school, ministerial and 
district meetings Dec. 26, 27, 28. a feast on the 29th 
then open with a series of meetings and Bible study 
I hnd beautiful weather, no snow." 

BRO. J. G. Rover is very much interested in the 
suggestions of Bro. M. G. Brumbaugh regarding the 
approaching b.centennial of the Brethren church He 
h.nks that the incident ought not to pass by without 
some suitabe notice on our part. I, is believed that 
we should do something special in 1908 to bring our 
claims more fully before the world. Possibly there 
are others who are also interested. 

Bro. Ira. P. Eby, who has for several years bee,, 
engaged ,n mission work in Southeaster,/ Mi so 

buld T S ° '° Cuba and do wh at he can to 

build up the cause of Christ on that island. There a e 
pobably others who are looking in the same di ZZ 
and ,n due time will locate. We already have tw 
ministers ,n Cuba and a, no distant day ought to ha 

churches " ^ "*" " ~» -''"« 



In the Christian Workers' meetings last Sunday 
evening, in all parts of the Brotherhood, China as 
a prospective mission field, was the subject for con- 
sHeration At Elgin a number of interesting and 
helpful talks were made by the different speakers 
Something was said about the vast empire, the age of 
the country and the four hundred millions of people 
represented by the one government. Then, there were 
talks about the religion of the Chinese, their customs 
and the probable future of the empire. Meetings of 

hen, I 1 1 r, g Pe ° Ple g °° d ' The y not on 'y Aspire 
the,,, but help them to information that is certain to 
prove beneficial in years to come. It is probably safe 
to say that our people, the United States over, learned 
some things about China last Sunday that will not 
soon be forgotten. 

Sister Marguerite B.xler writes us f ro „, her 
-me at East Akron, Ohio, saying that she e, oyed 

Sn r ew C e en tT P "f* *" TaM ^ "* 
She wen from place to place with an open Bible and 

also an open song book. As she visited places of 

merest she read what the Bible had to say abou 

them and then, mspired by the sacred association 

experienced by the Christian traveler in this coum 

he sang he sweet songs of Zion on the mountam 

ops as well as ,n the valleys. But she is now in he 

home land again To her the Bible is a new book, an, 

the songs of Zion contain new beauties. With in 

creased inspiration and with enlarged views of tie 

land of the Sacred Story she is ready to go among 

churches and aid them in their song services S 



The demand for our premium book "The Other 
Half of the Globe," has been so great that we find it 
necessary to print another large edition. The edition 
printed was unusually large for the first one. and it 
now looks as though we may need as many books to 
fill the future orders as it has required to fill those 
received ,,, the past. We are receiving from three 
hundred to six hundred letters a day right along, and 
tins means hundreds of orders for the book. We are 
glad for the great and even growing demand for the 
work. It shows that our people want good reading 
matter, and that they are satisfied with the most ex- 
cellent terms on which the premium book may be 
bad. In this connection we call special attention to 
the advertisement on the last page of this issue. 

The General Mission Board has considered and 
acted on the advisability of having some of our dec- 
imal tracts translated into one of the languages of 
India and see to it that they are well distributed The 
Board believes in thoroughly indoctrinating the con-' 
verts of India, as well as those made in other lands 
This can be done by a wise use of tracts as well as 
in other ways. In most mission fields doctrine is a 
secondary consideration but our people believe this 
class of teaching must have all due attention. When 
he apostles went among the heathen preaching the 
Gospel, the doctrine of the New Testament was by 
no means overlooked. To carry out the wishes of 
« Board, Brethren J. M. Blougb, W. B. Stover and 
Sis tr E, 12 B . MiI]er have been a t£d J_ 

mittee on Translation, Publication and Distribution 
and an appropriation has been made to defray the 

BoartT' iS 3 ' ? ° 0<l m ° Ve UP °" the >» rt ° ! 'he 



DOING OUR BEST. 
When we enter a year we can never tell what it 

hall e! tb , " S r "° r Ca " WC know wta her we 

Shall see the end of it. We live but one minute at 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



a time, and on rising in the. morning have at our 
disposal only the one day. Realizing this, our pur- 
pose should be to begin the year well and then do our 
best every minute, as the minutes are dealt out to us. 
A public speaker,, who is making quite a success in 
his way, once told us that in his addresses he does 
his very best on each point as he conies to it. He 
never slights one part of his discourse for the pur- 
pose of doing better on some other part. His best 
is done from start to finish. 

This might well be our policy during the year that 
we have just entered. Each day should have the best 
efforts of our hearts, and hands. Each day will of 
course bring its duties, and these should have our 
attention for the day. These duties will differ the 
one from the Other as the days may differ, but no 
duty should be neglected on account of the duties of 
the morrow. He who does his work well to-day will 
be in better condition for the labors and the efforts of 
the morrow. 

For years it has been our policy to fill each issue of 
the Messenger with the very best matter on hand at 
the time of handing out the copy, keeping in mind, 
of course, the necessity of variety. By thus doing we 
can feel that we are giving our patrons the best every 
week in the year. Instead of placing the largest and 
ripest berries on top, as fruit venders often do, we 
pick out the best fruits and fill the measure, and then 
endeavor to do even better the next time. 

This is to be our policy for the year 1907. Last 
year we gave our readers the very best spiritual viands 
within our reach. This we did week after week. We 
are not much for making promises, but it now looks 
as though the Messenger patrons are going to be 
favored with the finest assortment of articles ever 
sent out from the Brethren Publishing House. We 
have some of these articles on hand, others are in 
course of preparation and still more have been 
promised by good thinkers, who know how to place 
their views on paper in good, readable form. By 
doing our very best for our patrons each week we 
fondly hope to give them, for 1907, the very best 
volume of the Gospel Messenger yet published. We 
certainly shall not be content to fall below the record 
for previous years. 

Might it not be well for our preachers to give their 
congregations during the year, the very best sermons 
they can prepare and deliver? This they can do by 
doing their very best each time they attempt to address 
the public. If the two thousand active preachers in 
the Brotherhood will give their congregations their 
very best each week, what a power for good they will 
become ! 

Then we have in the United States and Canada about 
one thousand Sunday schools, and most of them are 
well officered. By all of these officers endeavoring to 
do their very best each Sunday they will accomplish 
still more good, in the way of converting young people, 
planting the seed of the kingdom in the hearts of others 
and making the world better than even the two thou- 
sand active ministers. 

Think also of the one hundred thousand members 
of the Brethren church trimming their lamps and let- 
ting their light shine better than it ever shone before! 
Think of the one hundred thousand devout men and 
women, young and old, doing their very best to live 
the Christ life! Think of such an army of earnest, 
intelligent and consecrated workers, extending from 
the Atlantic to the Pacific, all engaged in their Father's 
business., letting their light shine, living the Christ life 
and doing their very utmost to save a lost world ! 

May it be the purpose of all of us to do our best 
for Christ and the church during the year 1907. We 
should do our best every hour, every day and every 
week. Then, when the last day of the year comes, 
we can look back over the months gone by and say : 
" I have done my best for the cause of my Master: 
I have fought a good fight ; I have kept the faith, and 
I now am ready to enter the year 1908, the long-looked- 
for bicentennial of the Brotherhood, and do still better 
work than has been done in the past." With all of this, 
and even more in contemplation, may it be our fixed 
purpose to do our best as the days and weeks of 1907 
come and go. 



ELDER G. J. FERCKEN. 



THE HUMDRUM OF LIFE. 



It is with much regret that we announce to the 
readers of the Messenger the withdrawal of Elder 
Fercken from the fellowship of the Brethren church 
for the purpose of uniting with the Swedenborg 
Society. 

In a recent letter he has this to say: " After several 
days of inward struggle and keen, poignant anguish, 
accompanied with much prayer for guidance, I have 
finally decided to totally withdraw from the Brethren 
church with which I am no more in sympathy as to 
doctrine, rites and ordinances. It gives me much pain 
to leave a church where I have always been well 
treated, which loved me and trusted me and for which 
I have given the best years of my life. I am afraid 
I have not done as well as I could, but in the presence 
of trying difficulties and experiences I constantly met 
I did what I could ... I wish you would 
convey to the whole brotherhood my regrets and the 
assurance of my lasting affection." 

For several years it has been known that Elder 
Fercken was to some extent interested in the mystic 
philosophy of Swedenborg. Over two years ago he 
began .writing on the subject and had published a 
small work on the subject under a nom de plume. 
When our brethren Miller and Trout and their com- 
pany visited the mission two years ago, Elder Fercken 
then said he had lost all interest in the subject, that 
he had dropped it and would have nothing more to do 
with it. At the same time, and frequently since then, 
he declared himself to be in full sympathy with the 
faith and practice of the Brethren church. But it 
seems that he did not drop the philosophy of the 
Swede and the result has been as stated in the quota- 
tion from his letter. 

About the first of November last, he left France on 
his way ty the island of Mauritius, five hundred miles 
east of Madagascar, in the Indian Ocean, where he is 
to take charge of a French-speaking society of the 
people with whom he has cast his lot. 

Brethren Miller, Ziegler, Click and Guthrie, who are 
now traveling in the East, visited Geneva and Mon- 
treal by authority of the General Missionary Com- 
mittee and carefully looked after the needs of the 
mission. Elder Fercken had gone before their arrival. 
Brother Adrian Pellet, a minister in the second degree, 
was placed in charge of the work for the present, and 
the Orphanage at Montreal, France, was closed, the 
children taken to Geneva and placed under the care 
of Brother and Sister Pellet. As soon as it can be 
done an American brother will be sent to Geneva, and 
the work so well begun in France and Switzerland 
will be carried forward, under God's blessing, to 
success. 

Altogether not far from one hundred have been 
baptized since the mission opened, and at one time it 
had the promise of great success. The desertion of 
the elder in charge will doubtless hinder the work 
temporarily, but being the Lord's work it does not 
depend on any one man or set of men. It will be 
continued and carried forward to success in the name 
of the Master. 

Of Elder Fercken we 1 have no criticism or unkind 
word to offer. It is believed that while he was with 
us he did what he could. He has his strength and 
weaknesses, and in this he does not differ from most 
men. When he was no longer in sympathy with the 
church he quietly withdrew and for this he is to be 
commended. Of one thing we feel sure, that no matter 
where he may spend the few years he yet has to live 
he will never find more love and confidence than was 
given him by the Brethren church. Neither do we 
believe that the mystic philosophy of the great Swede 
will satisfy his soul yearnings as does the simple faith 
in Jesus as the Savior of the world. Other men have 
come to the church and left her communion but she 
has gone on in her efforts to re-establish primitive 
Christianity. For a brief moment a slight ripple has 
been raised and then the name becomes a mere memory 
to die out and be forgotten in a very few years. The 
work of the Lord goes on as if they had never lived, 



The other morning, as we walked out, we noticed 
a horse hitched to a post. After thinking for a moment 
we remembered that for a long time, every morning, 
the same horse stood there hitched to this same post. 
And then we were made to think of the man who 
hitched him there and of the life that he was living. 
Every morning he comes to this same place for the 
same purpose. How common such a round of life 
must become. And why does he do it? It is part 
of his life. It means his bread and butter, his clothes, 
his home and the feeding and clothing of his children. 
And then another thought came to us, Why does this 
man live ? To repeat over and over again the same old 
routine of doing ! Will there be an end to the rope or 
a gap in the circle? 

As we look at the picture it becomes painfully un- 
pleasant and we were reminded of the ox at the water- 
drawing wheel on the banks of the Nile, in Egypt. 
Tramp, tramp, and round and round goes the ox from 
early morn to the dusky evening to lie down, rest and 
eat his provender that he may resume the same hum- 
drum stepping on the morrow, and on the morrow, 
until the joints stiffen and the knees refuse to bend. 
Is this life? And if so, what kind of a life is it? 
liere are two lives running in the same groove. The 
one we call the ox life and the other the man life. 
Arc they different, and if so in what does the difference 
consist ? 

But after further thought, the question comes : Why 
ask about a difference? Is not all life much after 
the same order? Our sympathy went out toward this 
man and his horse because of the seeming repetition, 
making the same circle and ending at the same post. 
But as we think of it he is not the only man that 
revolves in circles, moves in cogs and makes the same 
ending. We know of housewives who have been keep- 
ing house, cooking meals, washing, mending, etc., 
during a half century or more — from girlhood through 
womanhood on to old age. Men farm and farm during 
their whole lifetime, plow, sow, harvest and gather, 
year after year, practically the same kind of work, 
making the same rounds and ending up at the same 
post. The same is true of the mechanic, the merchant 
and the professionals. All move in their respective 
circles, to end up at the same post. 

As we put the feed-and-clothe idea into life — and 
this alone — what a monotonous thing we make of it? 
How humdrum life does seem. We always opposed 
keeping the caged singing bird in our house. En- 
slaving a life was always unpleasant to us. The Hying 
up against the cage and beating its wings against its 
sides always grated in our ears and destroyed the 
sweetest strains of music which the bird might sing 
during the intervals from struggle. But how much 
better off are men and women if tethered to posts and 
rounded within circles? And in a sense, so we are and 
so we do. This is especially true if eating, clothing, 
home-making and perpetuating our kind are the chief 
objects for which we are living, as with too many of 
us this seems to be, 

This thought brings up the question, Can we throw 
a purpose within these rounds and circles that is not 
of them or related to them, but that is outside of and 
beyond them? Yes, we are more than oxen, or at 
least should be. We do not live to eat and wear 
clothes. We eat and wear clothes that we may live 
as God would have us live and do. 

We are slaves in the humdrum of life because of 
our wrong notions and purposes of life. It is right 
and proper that we should provide food to eat, clothes 
to wear and homes in which to live; yet this is not 
the purpose for which God placed us here, or the 
mission unto which we have been called. 

Mary, no doubt, enjoyed homelife. She cooked, 
ate and had regard to comeliness and propriety in her 
dressing and general appearance. But when Jesus 
came to visit at their home she made all these things 
subservient to the higher purpose in her life. Martha 
may have excelled her sister in culinary adeptness 
because these things had a greater place in her pur- 
pose in life. It is just possible that these two sisters 
were equally devoted to their home work. But the 
pne made it an end in life, while the other made it 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



renders it painful for him to enter the water. We 
feel sure that these two men were sent to preach the 
Gospel, but, like Paul, they were not sent to baptise. 



only a means to an end. When the test came, both 

showed their leading: purposes in life. And while 

Martha's was not altogether ignored she was taught 

that there was a higher purpose in life than merely 

gratifying- physical wants. On the other hand, Mary 

was commended for looking after the better part. 

Martha confined the purpose of her activities within W e ,,.,,„ ,„ „„,. „„„„„,.„-,■ u r. -"• i i j 

r r vve nave in our congregation a member who is looked 

the circle. Mary was working within to reach that up0 n as a fornicator. We read, that with such a one we 



WORKING WITH THE CHURCH. 



their parents, should be in Sunday school. If we 
would make our work a success we must look after 
both the young and the old. If members are not 
regular in the attendance of church services we should 
know why. Then we should know why the children 
are not in Sunday school, A matter of this sort is 
too important to be overlooked. 



on the outside. 
'"And so it is all through the activities of life. The 
humdrum of life cannot be determined by the circles 
they make, or the posts at which they stop and tie. 
Two men may make the same daily rounds and stop 
at the same points. The one may have fed and clothed 
himself poor as poverty, because in the winding up his 
end and purpose meet and he has nothing. His living 
was all for time. The other only reaches his purpose 
as he ends his last round. He makes his rounds and 
reaches his posts for this purpose. Every round made 
and post reached brings joy and gladness- to his own 
life. It is an inspiration and hope to him because he 
is meeting- his expectations. 

Two women may cook, wash dishes and do house- 
work- for a lifetime. To the one it may be a weariness 
to the flesh and a vexation of the spirit from beginning 
to finish, while to the other the round of duty may be 
a constant source of enjoyment. The one consumes 
the energies spent on the now, the other stores it 
away as treasures laid up in heaven. 

The same may be true in every form and phase of 
our life-work. Some men and women cannot be 
tethered in their work for Christ. Paul worked as 



are not to eat — not to commune. As. the members and 
officials will not deal with the party, but leave him stand 
in the church, I feci that I cannot go to the communion 
table, and am told that if I cannot commune in my home 
church I should not undertake to commune elsewhere. 
What am I to do under the circumstances? 

Possibly the brother is mistaken about his con- 
gregation holding in fellowship one who is a forni- 



APPROACHING DEATH. 



We are told of an aged sister, nearly seventy-five 
years old, who, on account of failing health, realizes 
that she cannot remain long in 'this world, and is 
therefore very much discouraged. We have often 
wondered why the aged should be discouraged on 
cator. It may be a case about which he and the church accour " of approaching death. Do such people actually 
honestly differ, and in that event it is not generally believe in a future state of perfect happiness for the 
wise for one member to set up his judgment against righteous ? If so, why do they dread the change from 
the judgment of the church. It would, however, be tn ' s to " ,e other world ? To desire long life upon the 
a grave piece of mismanagement, indeed, should the ear "' is proper, but when we realize that our labors 
officials and other devout members knowingly consent are en ded, and that the angel of death will soon come 



to retain in fellowship a fornicator who has not fully 
repented of his. sin. We can hardly conceive of such 
a condition in any congregation in touch with its 
district meeting. When one has put forth his best 
efforts to have his church see as he does on a. matter 
in dispute, and the church chooses to decide other- 
wise, he can feel that he has done his duty and his 
conscience ought to be clear. But he should not, on 
that account, absent himself from the Lord's table. 



to bear us away to that better land, ought we not to 
feel happy? Instead of becoming discouraged the 
saint ought to be delighted. He knows that on enter- 
ing the home of the soul he will meet hundreds of 
the blest who have gone before. There he will be 
welcomed by the loved ones he knew upon the earth, 
who are awaiting his arrival. Knowing all of this, 
why should the righteous be discouraged at the near 
approach of death? We should rather rejoice, not 



A man is sometimes charged with a crime that cannot because we are to leave the dear ones behind, but 



be proven against him. In the minds of some it mav 



well in prison and stocks as out in the field and anions k„ -, -l„,r ™.„ k.,t :» n. i o ~7 

his brethren. While the Bedford jail confined John "^ b "' " "" "°' be clear '° t,,e Ch " rCh 



Bunyan's body, his purpose flung " Pilgrim's Prog- 
ress " to the four winds of the earth. No humdrum 
in such lives. rr r n 



NOT SENT TO BAPTIZE. 



as a body. In such instances let the minority submit 
to the majority, and continue in the regular services 
of the church until more light can be had. There are 
few occasions, indeed, when one should feel justified 
in absenting himself from the Lord's table simply 
because his church does not see things as he sees the 



because we are going to the home of the blest, the 
place about which wc have been talking, reading and 
singing ever since childhood. 



THE WRONG SPIRIT. 



In 1 Cor. 1 : 17 Paul says Christ sent him not to 
baptize, but to preach the Gospel. He knew that 
Jesus had sent him and he clearly understood his special 
mission, but was confident that it was not to ad- 
minister the rite of baptism. Others, like John the 
Baptist, may have been sent to baptize as well as to 
preach, but Paul's commission did not read that way. 
But while he was not sent to baptize, we never hear 
of him endeavoring to reason away baptism, or 
saying anything against the rite. No New Testament 
writer has more to say in support of baptism, as a 
Christian institution, than the apostle to the Gentiles. 
He not only enjoined it upon his converts, but on a 
few occasions administered the rite himself. He even 
went so far as to have some, who had been baptized 
unto John's baptism, baptized again, after being 
properly instructed. 

And yet he says that he was not sent to baptize 
He probably had a physical ailment that measurably 
incapacitated him for administering the baptism 
authorized by Christ. He doubtless refers to this 
physical condition in 2 Cor. 10: 10, where he speaks 
if his bodily presence as weak. God sends men to 



What ought to be thought of a preacher who says that, 
could he do about as lie feels, he would place a keg of 
M i u , , , , , ? '" m ' dynamite in the cellar and blow the house and members 

Nor should he stand aloof from the other members into eternity? 



because the church happens to see things differently 
from what they appear to him. His better way is to 
show by his zeal, energy and consistency, that while 
he thinks he is right, he is willing to exercise all 
necessary forbearance. Regarding fornication, or any 
other gross crime, the New Testament demands that 
the church shall purge herself from those who commit 
such sins. The Conference has also urged the 
churches to do their utmost to keep the body of 
Christ pure. If any of our churches are neglecting 
their duty in this particular they should lie reported 
to the elders assembled at their district meeting. 



do that for which they a, ul was ^^ ^ paren(s ^ ^ .^ ^ ™ ~ 



AN ALARMING CONDITION. 

From one of the state districts we have a report 
that is worth thinking about. The report shows that 
there are in the district about four hundred and 
seventy members and only one hundred and ninety- 
six of them attend services regularly. There are one 
hundred and forty-seven who never attend services 
at all, and the rest are irregular in their attendance. 
In this district there are five hundred and eighty-six 



We should class such a preacher with those men- 
tioned in Luke 9:54-56. James and John wanted 
permission to call fire from heaven to destroy certain 
people. Jesus rebuked them and told them that they 
did not understand what manner of spirit they were 
of. They acted foolishly and deserved the rebuke they 
received. There are still some foolish preachers upon 
the earth. They will say and do things that are of no 
credit to either themselves or the cause they represent. 
For the time they do not seem to know what manner 
of spirit they manifest. Such men need to be rebuked 
sharply, and urged to study the spirit of Christ more 
thoroughly. Not only so, but what the minister is 
reported to have said is criminal. It is murder in the 
heart, and if carried out would result in the man 
being hung. The man doubtless never meant what 
he said. It is, however, a sample of pulpit utterances 
heard in more places than one. It shows how some 
men are injuring their reputation by trying to act anrl 
talk like Sam Jones. The pulpit utterances in the 
Brethren church should be kept on a higher plane. 



eminently fitted for preaching the Gospel. As a writer 
he had still better qualifications. He clearly recog- 
nized that his mission in this world was to carry the 
Gospel to the people, to both the learned and the 
unlearned. This he did by his preaching and writing 
and so successful was he in his work that he has 
never been excelled as a missionary, evangelist and 
expounder of the Word of God. 

Years ago we knew a very devout minister, who 
understood the Gospel, and could preach it in an under- 
standing and entertaining manner, but his physical 
condition was such that he did not dare undertake 
to administer the rite of baptism except under the 
most favorable circumstances. In fact, he would never 
undertake to do so if some other minister could be 
secured for the work. Then we happen to know 
another earnest and well-informed elder who addresses 
the largest assemblies that can be crowded into some 
of our churches. He is an able preacher and writer, 
but has baptized only a few people during his years 
of usefulness as a minister. His physical condition 



hundred of them do not attend any kind of service. 
Two hundred and ninety-eight attend Sunday school 
regularly, while nearly one hundred attend only oc- 
casionally. This is an unfortunate condition for any 
district. In fact, the danger point has been reached. 
When less than one-half of the members of a con- 
gregation attend church regularly, and nearly one-half 
of their children are out of the Sunday school, it is 
time to sound the alarm. Then think of churches 
where nearly one-third of the members are never seen 
in the regular services! But there may be other 
sections of the Brotherhood where the conditions are 
equally alarming, only the real situation has not yet 
been investigated and the results made known. Might 
it not be a good thing for each state district to in- 
stitute an investigation for the purpose of ascertaining 
the real condition along the lines referred to, and then, 
so far as necessary, apply such remedies as wisdom 
may dictate? A large majority of the members of 
the Brethren church should be regular in their attend- 
ance at the services, while all their children, along with 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER. 



A weekly religious journal. 16 large pages, Is publisher! In 
the Interest of the Brethren ,hu i . h :i, ,1 Is tilt only church 
!1.50 r p P er "anSum. y ' he autn ° rlt >' » f «■• Conference 1 : PriS 

of"Sanlp e Sf 8 pMct aS '" " r< " Urn '° the apost °" c °'<"" 
oei'i *"'''!? '1'-" "'" B "" e ls a divinely-inspired hook, and rec- 
ar,a'p e r S aoX N fTr ThTpe^le 'or "£,?"'* " ,&U "' lJ ™*>°<™«> 

pure, holy and upright life before God and man 

,, ';. "?*" Ita| ns that only those who remain faithful until 

death have the promise of eternal life- " Ui 

&,; *?n£%iX R £rti^£&^&jr conditions of par - 

faS&waSf SSfeVaSS; tl,e Cand ' date three tlmeS 
m. 1 h t P 1 eet -y n *'''ne. *>■" taught in John 13, Is a divine com- 
mand to he observed in the church • 

Tliat the Lord's Supper Is a meal, and, ii 
lie Communion, should be taken In the- .-ve 
close of the dan; 
ui T iJ at the Salutation of the Holy Kiss, or Kiss of Gharitv ii 
binding upon the followers of Christ- <~nanty, is 

That War and Retaliation are contrary to the spirit and 
self-denying prim iol„s ..f U,e religion nf Jesus Ch.ist; d 

n J a i' 1 Nonconformity to the world i n daily walk, dress, 
ChrisUan piety VerSa ° n ls essentiaI to true holiness and 

It maintains that In public worship, or religious exercises 
Christians .should appear as diivot.d in 1 Cor 11- -1 Y • 

witn a olT\n'tV''\\'r ^Scriptural duty of Anointing the sick 
uini Mil in the name of the Lord. 
„'" f" TOrt ' i( . '? « /'Indicator of all tha: Christ and the Apos- 

Tl.eort. ''!' J " I'"'' ','""", "»■ a '"' ">""<■ """'I ""-" COIlllktlng 

SS?. S .."V 1 ■}}"•■"""> "< modem -Christendom, to point out 

rKraple ™"y Address" " 08 " 6 t0 b ° ""'alUMy safe. Send for 

Brethren Publishing House, Elgin, %\\, 



Vm^w-acmHi 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



General Missionary and Tract Department 

OOMMITTSBi 

D. I>. Miller, - - Illinois I H. C. Early, - - Virginia 

i. W. Teeter, - - Indiana 1 C. D. Bonsaoi, - - D. C. 

John Znok. Iowa. 

Address all traslDesa to 
Qeneral Missionary and Tract Committee, Elgin, IK, 

SOME MISSIONARY DIFFICULTIES IN JAPAN. 



These difficulties, and others that might be mentioned. 
are not by any means confined to Japan, but on account of 
the character of the people are making themselves more 
keenly felt there. Perhaps the best solution will be to 
leave the people manage the work in their country as 
fast as they are able; and in the meantime do the best 
thing possible — practice patience. c. m. 

® 3> <8» 
FROM DAHANU, INDIA. 



It is reported that Japanese Christians are agreed that 
no more foreign missionaries are wanted in Japan. One 
of the reasons for the feeling is that the missionaries do 
not always conduct themselves toward the Japanese 
preachers and Christians as toward a man, a brother, and 
an equal. The number who are lacking in this respect 
need not be large in order to bring all into disfavor. Such 
men and women are out of place on the mission field. 
They have not the spirit of the Christ, and so fail to ac- 
complish his work. They are to be pitied perhaps more 
than blamed, and by all means placed where they cannot 
do harm to the cause which they have been sent out to 
help establish among a people who have for ages been 
heathen, but are now being converted to the true religion. 
And the reason why not all American and English mis- 
sionaries treat the natives of the different countries as 
equals is undoubtedly because they feel their superiority. 
The white race has so long been the dominant one that it 
comes natural for the white man or white woman to con- 
sider other races inferior. This feeling shows itself with- 
out effort on the part of most of us. In many respects 
there is reason for the white irian to feel proud of his 
race, but in others he has reason to hang his head for 
shame; for some of the worst crimes of all history have 
been perpetrated by the white race. 

But the reason for the treatment of other races as in- 
ferior does not remove the problem caused by this treat- 
ment. And it would seem that if the feeling of hostility 
on the part of the Japanese cannot be overcome by the 
removal of the objectionable persons, it would be well to 
comply with the demand that no more foreign mission- 
aries be sent; at least until some time has passed and the 
wounds have healed. To continue sending those who are 
objectionable but retards the progress of the work and 
increases the feeling of hostility. People may be forced 
to do many things; but when it comes to their feelings the 
application of force nearly always makes a bad matter 
worse. 

Then the control of the forces and the funds by the for- 
eigners does not suit the Japanese at all. Here is a prob- 
lem. The native Christians are not financially able to car- 
ry on the work by themselves; they must depend on Eng- 
land and America for the money needed. The money has 
been kept in the hands of the missionaries, and with the 
control of it has, to a large extent, gone the controlling 
voice in the direction of the work. The Japanese, who 
are so quick to take up the management of affairs which 
concern them, naturally are not pleased with these con- 
ditions. They would like to say where and how the money 
is to be spent. They would like to enter more largely into 
the direction of the work, whose object is the leading of 
their brethren from darkness to light. 

The feeling on each. side is the one which must be ex- 
pected. If we deny ourselves in order to give money to 
accomplish a certain work, we like to make sure that the 
money is used to the best possible advantage for the pur- 
pose intended; and we want to feel very sure of our men 
before we entrust to them the handling of the money. 
And the need of conservatism seems all the greater when 
it is a question of our managing it or of those who have 
but recently believed as we do. On the other hand it is 
not strange that those among whom we work should 
want to manage their religious efforts. They are not less 
interested than we and they understand their people better 
than strangers can hope to in a few years. There is need 
of forbearance on both sides if the cause is not to be hin- 
dered. 

Another thing hard for the native to understand and to 
reconcile himself to is the fact that it requires so much 
more to support the foreign missionary than it does a 
man or woman of the country, and the difference seems 
wasted. Why should the foreigners have more than the 
native? That is the question which cannot but arise in the 
mind of the one who thinks. It is hard to reconcile one- 
self to different standards of living, and to realize that 
custom has made some things necessary to one person, 
while another can do without them arid not feel that he 
Is practicing self-denial. And here again it is not strange 
that the native should think more would be accomplished 
if no missionaries, or but few, were there; for from three 
to five native workers will be supported on what keeps 
prig white person. 



These arc busy days. So many sick people come to us 
daily. We become more and more convinced that the 
man who can help the people when they are sick can do a 
great good in this land. 

"The fields are white already unto harvest but the 
laborers arc few; pray ye therefore the Lord of the har- 
vest, that he send more laborers into the harvest." 

Florence Baker Pittenger. 

Nov. 23. 

<$> <S> <S> 

FROM BULSAR, INDIA. 



We appreciate very much to be about again after four 
weeks of confinement to our room. I do not remember 
those days alone as days of illness, but as days of precious 
waiting before our loving heavenly Father. Some one has 
truly said: "We pray and pray, but in the busy rush of 
life we do not take time to listen to what our Father 
would say to us." What sweet and precious lessons he 
taught us as we waited before him! They give us strength 
for future service. 

We often say that one day is much like another, but 
" special days" do come to us all. Such has Nov. 20 been 
to us. Duty called Bro. Pittenger away from home dur- 
ing the forenoon. No sooner had he gone than a woman 
came to our door. She put down from her head the heavy 
basket and began beating her breast and wailing in the 
most pitiful manner. What can the matter be? She and 
her mother had been living together. Both were widows 
and now the mother had died. We tried to comfort her, 
but she would not be comforted. We told her of our hope 
in Jesus, but she had no such hope because she knows not 
our Jesus. She would listen to us for a while, then would 
beat her body in the most cruel manner. How such scenes 
do make our hearts ache. These people are groping in 
darkness and only God's power can open their understand- 
ing. Faith will come to them through hearing, but they 
must have teachers or how can they hear? 

While at our noon meal we spoke oi God's goodness and 
love to us and how much we do appreciate the peace of 
our humble little India home. Our meal finished, we were 
sitting by our study table attending to some business mat- 
ter. A messenger came and handed John a telegram. As 
we had been thinking that Bro. Stover and Bro. McCann 
might come any day because of business matters, I said 
at once: " It must be from Wilbur." But the expression on 
John's face told that the message was a sad one. '* Your 
mother died. Buried on Wednesday." Could it be true? 
We looked at it over and over again. Yes, it had come 
from Elgin, and there can be no mistake. Only those who 
have had like experiences can understand what such mes- 
sages mean. What a good mother she has been! How 
truly and tenderly she loved her children! During these 
two years as long as she was physically able never a week 
passed, but that she sent us a message of love and com- 
fort. When she could not write herself she had others 
write for her. All during her long illness she longed to 
see us once again. Only the loving Father knows the 
homesick hours she spent for her "boy," yet she always 
prayed that God might use us mightily in this great work. 
We praise his name for mother's noble, precious life and 
the sacred memories of her unnumbered acts of love and 
kindness. 

Our teacher, who is a cultured Brahmin, came in. From 
the moral standpoint he is a perfect gentleman. John told 
him of what comfort the promises of our Lord and Sayior 
are to us in these sad hours. I give some of the questions 
he asked: 

1. You believe that salvation is attained only through 
Jesus Christ? 

2. Suppose there is a man who never had any chance to 
know Christ. He dies, and then what becomes of him? 

3. You believe that God is a just God and that he is 
compassionate? 

4. Suppose a man lives a perfectly good life, does good 
in every possible way, but does not accept Christ as the 
Savior, what becomes of that man when he dies? 

5. If God is just, how can he punish a good man? 

6 How do you know that your Bible is true? 

7 You believe in your Bible. We believe in our sacred 
books and wc worship the one true God. It is all a matter 
of faith. Now tell me, please, where the difference comes 

The trouble was the man's mind was not open to listen 
to the differences. 

Our evening's devotions were especially precious to us. 
Luka led in prayer. First, he prayed God for his love to 
all people. Then he said we are sad because of the mes- 
sage that came telling of our dear mother's death. But he 
said- "Since we are all God's children we need not be 
sad. Mother is not dead, she only sleeps, and one day 
we will all rise and reign together forever in glory. Then 
followed a mdst earnest plea for God's special blessings 
to rest upon Bro. Pittenger at this hour. Yes, it was the 
prayer of a native brother, but what peace and comfort 
it brought to us. It made us appreciate our religion all 
the more because it assured us that the same peace that 
we know also reigns in our brother's heart. Thus ended 
this sad, sad, yet blessed day. 

Yesterday our hearts were made glad because Brother 
fl nd Sister Stover and Sister Alice Ebey spent the day 
with us. It always does vis good to associate together, 



About one month ago Abdul Aziz, accompanied by his 
wife and sister-in-law, came to labor awhile with us. He was 
formerly a Mohammedan, but about twenty years ago was 
converted to Christianity. Since that time he has been a 
very earnest and enthusiastic worker for the Lord. He 
has visited England and America. His wife is an English 
woman. He is a very strong believer in prayer and the 
blessings of the Holy Spirit. Since he came here he has 
been able to touch the native Christians in a way that none 
of us as yet have been able to do. We are glad for this 
and we hope his stay with us may be for the good of all 
and for the honor and glory of God. 

Yesterday was Thanksgiving day, so last evening we as- 
sembled in our meeting room to thank and praise our Lord 
for the many blessings we had received during the year, 
Bro. Blough opened the services and made a few remarks 
as to what the day means and also tried lo impress upon 
the minds of the children that all the blessings they had 
received were gifts from God. Afterwards he called upon 
them to tell what they were thankful for One boy's tes- 
timony was especially touching and impressive. I will 
give it to our readers, as it may be the means of helping 
others. He said a poor old man with a Tittle boy came to 
their school the other day, and at once some of the boys 
began to call'him names and to make fun of him. Of 
course this made the poor man feel very bad. He said: 
"You boys arc here going to school and some day some 
of you will be lawyers, some doctors, some teachers, etc., 
but why are you so thoughtless as to make fun of me?" 
Our Christian boys stood hack and in their hearts they 
thanked God that they had come in contact with those 
who have taught them that it is wrong to laugh at the 
misfortunes of others. They felt very sorry for the man. 
This boy said he thanked God that he had been given 
such good advice and that he had such a mind and heart. 
Others said that they thanked God that he had spared 
their lives, that lie had spared their friends, that Jesus is 
their Savior, that God had given them work to do. that 
they had been kept from disease and sickness, etc. In all 
we had a very profitable meeting. We were made to think 
how unthankful we arc for all (he blessings God gives us. 
Brother and Sister Blough and Brolher and Sister Long 
are contemplating a trip to North India and Central Prov- 
inces the coming month, 

Brother and Sister Lichty arc returning to their field of 
labor after an absence of several months at a health resort. 
They arc returning feeling much stronger and better than 
when they left. We praise God for this and hope they 
will continue to be strong and well. 

Since the fever season has set in a number of our mis- 
sionaries have fallen victims to the shaking disease. Sis- 
ter Eliza Miller returned yesterday from a short visit with 
Bro. Lichty's, where she had gone to recover from fever. 
Little Emmeft Stover and Henry McCann have just gotten 
over hard attacks of fever also. Sister E. H. Eby had 
been very sick too, but is better now. Wc are glad that 
all are better again. 

As Brother and Sister Blough expect to be away next 
month, Sister Mary Quinter has come to help in the work 
at this station. 

Bro. Stover, Bro. Pittenger and Bra McCann are out 
this week looking up a new station for Brother and Sister 
"Pittenger, who have not yet been permanently located. 
Sister McCann and the children accompanied them. They 
expect to visit our dear Brother and Sister Berkebile be- 
fore returning home. 

Sister Pittenger has been spending several days with us 
here during her husband's absence from home. She has 
recovered from her sickness, but hasn't regained her 
strength yet. Yours for Christ, 

Gertrude E. Emmert. 

N - 3a • « 

FROM QUINTER, KANS. 



Bro. A. C. Daggett came to us Nov. 18 anil held forth 
the Word with power for three weeks. The result was six 
were made willing to go down into the stream there to 
he buried with Christ in baptism. Four await the rite. 
We also had preaching on Thanksgiving, Brother Daggett 
delivering the discourse, at which time an offering of fif- 
teen dollars was given for the Gospel Messenger fund. 

Wc held our council Dec. l..at which time wc elected 
our Sunday-school officers for the ensuing year. Bro. 
D Hcckman was chosen superintendent and Bro. H. Bow- 
man assistant. J- E - Springer. 

Quinter, Kans,, Dec. 24. 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



Notes From Our Correspondents 



"As cold water to a thirsty soul. : 



s from a far country.' 



CALIFORNIA. 
Lordsburg. — Many of our members enjoyed attending 
the Bible school held at Lordsburg College last week. 
Sunday evening, Dec. 23, Bro. L. J. Lehman preached 
an earnest sermon at Pomona. Monday evening the 
Lordsburg Sunday school rendered a Christmas program. 
Instead of giving the children each a sack of candy we 
asked them, and the "grown folks" as well, to bring 
something to give the poor. A collection was lifted at 
the close of the exercises. The donations and collection 
amounted to twenty-five or thirty dollars. The Pomona 
school had their exercises on Christmas night. Wc had 
preaching services in the Lordsburg house Christmas at 
30 A. M. Eld. Yundt preached and administered the 
ordinance of baptism to an isolated brother who came 
here seeking baptism.— Grace Hileman Miller, Lords- 
burg, Cal., Dec. 27. 

COLORADO. 
Good Hope church met in a special council Dec. 16. 
preparatory to the regular quarterly council to he held 
at Haxtum, Jan. 5. Sunday-school officers were elected 
for the coming year, with Bro. Daniel Eikenberry super- 
intendent, and Sister Bessie Patterson assistant. Wc de- 
cided that at Christmas we would give rather than re- 
ceive. On the Sunday preceding Christmas we took up a 
collection of $16, to which wc added $10 of the Sunday- 
school money, and sent it to Bro. A. W. Ross, of India 
as a Christmas present Bro, L. J. Lehman, of lohns- 
town. Pa., en route to Los Angeles. Cal., stopped and 
preached for us Dec. 2.— Mary C. Greenawalt. Lock Box 
18S, Sterling, Colo., Dec. 27. 



nig. Much business was transacted. Two letters of mem- 
bership were received and two granted. We reorganized 
our Sunday school, with Sister Blosser superintendent 
and Bro. Pippcn assistant. Bro. Sanger tendered his 
resignation. On Dec. 23 one sister was received into 
the church by baptism, and two were received by letter — 
H. J. Miller. Nappnnce, Ind., Dec. 24. 

Flymouth.— Our series of meetings at the Blissvillc 
house, conducted by Bro. D. W. Gustin, of Sulphur 
Springs, closed Dec. 18. He delivered eighteen sermons. 
There were no immediate results, hut we trust the good 
seed may grow and develop into much fruit.— Emma Bot- 
torff, R. F. D. No. 7, Plymouth, Ind., Dec. 19. 

^Rossville.— Our church in Rossville was dedicated Dec. 
Z3 Bro. Galen B. Royer preaching the dedicatory sermon, 
llie bouse was crowded to its utmost capacity. The col- 
lection amounted to $340. Bro. Wm. Lampin, of Polo, 
1, is to follow this service with a series of meetings.— 
F. Metzger, Rossville, Ind., Dec. 24. 



ent, the latter officiating.- 
City, Kans., Dec. 27. 



-Nellie Reicen, R. D. I, Garde 



Osage —Sunday Dec. 23, a short program was rendered 
by t be Sunday-school scholars, which was much enjoyed 
by all present. In the evening Bro. J. C. Neher. of Nam- 



I'm. Nehe 
ning Dec. 
Kans., De 



..... ^ywuuti ,i series of meetings here, begin- 
30— Lena B. Nicholson, R. F. D. 4, McCune 
. 26. 



IDAHO. 

been enjoying 



Nezperce church has been enjoying a very interesting 
Bible meeting and series of meetings conducted by W. H 
Lichty, of Waterloo, Iowa. The meetings were well at- 
tended from start to finish, and the members were awak- 
ened to their duty. The topics studied were the Acts 
of the Apostles and the travels of St. Paul. In the even- 
ing we had preaching. Two made the good confession 
and were received into the church by baptism.— Wm H 
Lichty, Nezperce, Idaho, Dec. 18. 

ILLINOIS. 

Astoria.— Bro. C. Fitz, of Boulder, Colo., is among us 
after many years' absence. He preached at the Sunday 
evening services. Dec. 23, and last night preached the 
Christmas sermon. There was a collection taken for an 
afflicted brother who is traveling for his health, amount- 
ing to over twenty dollars. Our elder was also kindly re- 
membered on Christmas, being presented with a new cook 
stove Hour. corn, and many other things which were 
greatly appreciated.— Fay A. Rolirbaugh, R. D. 2 Box 
13, Browning. 111., Dec. 26. 

Oakley church met in council Dec. 29. Officers for 
the various church duties were elected for the ensuing 
year Bro^ Joe Hamm was elected superintendent of the 
Sunday school. Deeded to have a Bible term the rain- 
's year.— F.mma Sensenbaugh, Oakley, 111., Dec. 29 

Panther Creek church met in regular council Dec. 22 
our elder J. W. Switzer, presiding. Among other busi- 

and S Ch e ri^ia ^C ^v eC l tled ■ ,0 rc °.W>™ 'he Sunday school 
i™ Chnstian Workers' meetings in council hereafter. 
Bro. Dalton Miller was chosen superintendent of the Sun- 
day school, and Sister Pearl Sw'' 



wifzer president of the 
meeting, Bro. Calvert having moved 
to California ,t was decided that we solicit through the 
columns of the Messenger for a minister to locate with 
us in our great field of work. On Christmas day we had 
preaching and also several talks from different ones- 
Jessie Switzer. Roanoke, III., Dec. 25. 

D S R^v!?,f l "' rC ' , -? Ct in council Dcc ' l4 ' ««■ our cider. 
D. Rowland, presiding. Our present Sunday-school of- 
rSLYjlll? f^ „ T '- ,e >nu»y-scho,.I children have 
Whv ,S V T -" ,e ' r ""-"tracts for the Chicago 
Sunday-school Extension work. Dec. 17 Bro Rowland 
and family started for California, where thev will ,, 
the winter Bro. H. L. Baum will have charge of tie 
work here during their absence.-Etta Kreider Sha, 



Christian Workers' 



hannon, 



111., Dec. 24. 

p S "Sar Creek church met in council Dec. 22. with Eld 

B ', T ; P ,lb ™n Presiding. Three were received by letter 

and letters were granted. As our elder B ~ 

lias moved from our midst, we selected 

enstaff as our elder. Bro. Calvin Gibson 

penntendent, and Leona Gibson 

ner. Auburn, 111., Dec. 26. 



T. FilbrL 
D. J. Blick- 
was elected su- 
assistant.— H. H. Hoer- 



INDIANA. 
Bourbon.— Dec. 6 Bro. W. R. Deeter, of Milford Ind 
began a protracted meeting at the Cam , Creek church' 
closing the 19th. There were no accessions but some 
were near conviction. At our council, Dec 9 Bro W R 
3 air T^ ,!° ^"^ A " ta ^« Passed off 

Elkh h a e r, ra i e n C d ,ng De 1 c M |,. ,t ' "' -nembered.-S. - 
English Prairii 



jo: 

Upper Fall Creek.— Our series of meetings closed last 
1 hursd.iy evening. Bro. L. T. Holsinger preached nearly 
tour weeks. Seven dear souls came out on the Lord's 
side, six being baptized and one restored to fellowship, 
flic meetings, with the topical readings and song serv- 
ices each evening before preaching began, were interest- 
ing and very helpful. Bro. Holsinger preached a Thanks- 
giving sermon for us. The amount of the collection taken 
up was $13.10. Bro. Holsinger remained with us until 
to-day, after our council meeting. Bro. David Hoover 
wished to resign as elder, which was granted. Bro. Moses 
Smeltzer was then chosen to take his place. But he 
thought he could not accept it. and so we have no one at 
present Bro Geo. Reedy was anointed on last Sunday 
by Brethren Holsinger and Smeltzer. We organized a 
Christian Workers meeting at the Honey Creek church. 
—Florida J. E. Green. Middletown, Tnd., Dec. 23. 

IOWA. 
Coon River.— On Christmas evening Bro. L. D Bosscr- 
inaii closed his meetings in Yale with a full house and 
good interest. Though there were no additions, the mem- 
bers were encouraged and built up. Many truths were 
impressed upon the minds of the unbelievers. The ser- 
mons were made particularly impressive because of the 
judicious use of blackboard illustrations. Bro. Bosser- 
man did much house-to-house visiting, thus coming in 
direct contact with his hearers. We hope to see more 
fruits later.— J. D. Haughtclin, Panora, Iowa, Dec. 27. 

Franklin County church met Christmas day and en- 
joyed a very interesting sermon at the church, delivered 
by Bro. P. J. Sutter. While some of our members went 
away to spend their Christmas at other places, and some 
were detained at their homes on account of sickness, nev- 
ertheless we had a good, spiritual meeting. At the close 
of the meeting a collection of $7 was taken, which we 
decided to send to_ the St. Joseph mission to help feed 
the poor on New Year's day.— Elsie A. Pyle, R. F. D. No 
5, Box 30, Hampton. Iowa, Dec. 26. 

Garrison— The members met in council Dec. 22 to elect- 
regular officers for the Sunday school and Christian 
Workers meetings. Bro. J. B. Barnhart and Bro James 
Carney were elected superintendents of the Sunday school 
Wo t A a " C ' S Enmmster president of the Christian 

Workers Our series of meetings, which began Dec 2 
closed the 16th. Bro. Hood, of Marshalltown. Iowa 
preached for us each evening during the week and twice 
on Sunday— Rachel C. Christy, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 8 
Garrison. Iowa. Dec. 24. 

Libertyville church met in regular council Dec. 22 
the writer was chosen correspondent. Bro E G Roda- 
l.augh preached for us on Thanksgiving. A ' collection 
was taken tor world-wide missions, amounting to $8 
rf™ , AI) , ram n Wo1 «■ °f Udel, Iowa, was with us and 
P cached on Dec. 16. We will have preaching on the sec- 
ond and fourth Sundays during the months of January 
February and March— H. B. Johnston, R. F. D No 3 
Batavia, Iowa, Dec. 26. ' ' 

North English.-Bro. C. E. Wolf, of Ottumwa, began 
thi'riv' h mce " n t's at this place Dec. 2. and preached 

thirty-two sermons, closing Dec. 23. We had excellent 
merest, and enjoyed a feast of good things. Two of on 
Sunday-school scholars made the good choice and were 

ion""?, '\ C r"'?r S -A Ccla l med - 0th " s » re »«"■ 'be king- 
dom— Chas. M. Miller, North English, Iowa Dec 24 

Notice—Wanted Copies of ministerial or Sunday- 
eetings he d in the Middle District of Iowa bc- 
. 't- S 1 ' , Publication in compiled minutes Be 
De°e m 24 '"• 106 ° 3rd Ave " Cedar »»$■? Iowa' 

Panther Creek congregation met on Christmas day and 
ted to an excellent sermon by Eld. D. E. Brubaker, 
Morris. 111. -A collection of $14.10 was taken up 
South St. Joseph mission. After services one 
.. was restore! t^ f..li„....u:_ t.i_ -- -- 
Panthei 



Paint Creek church met in council Dec. 22. Our elder 
being absent, Eld. S. P. Crumpacker presided. Four let- 
ters were granted. "The officers of the Sunday school 
were elected, with the writer superintendent, Bro E L 
Crumpacker assistant. The attendance and interest have 
been very good so far. The writer was also chosen Mes- 
senger agent and correspondent.— Annie Richard R F 
D. No. 1. Unioutown, Kans., Dec. 23, 

Peabody church had' announced services on Thanks- 
giving, but on account of rain had no meeting So we 
had a Thanksgiving sermon on the Sunday before Christ- 
mas, by Bro. J. A. Thomas, assisted by Bro. J. A Ellen- 
bergcr, after which a collection of $10 was taken up one- 
half to go to the Kansas City mission and the other half 
to be used in sending the Gospel Messenger to families 
who reside in this congregation and are not members — 
Katie Yost, Lock Box 141, Peabody, Kans., Dec. 27. 

Pleasant View.— Yesterday was another glorious day 
spent in God s service. After a v/ell-delivered sermon by 
our elder A. F. Miller, a collection was taken up for the 
St. Joseph mission to assist in the dinner for the many 
poor children of that city on New Year's day A col- 
lection was also taken in the evening after the Christian 
Workers meeting, both amounting to more than $13 In 
the evening one of our young ministers gave us a good 
discourse on the subject, "Sirs, what must I do to be 
saved? —A. W. Finfrock, Darlow, Kans., Dec. 24. 

Wichita — On Christmas day the members of this 
church met and enjoyed a very spiritual meeting Bro 
\\ m. Johnson did the preaching. A collection was taken 
up to help the needy in this city. Bro. Jacob Witmore, 
pi McPherso,,, will be with us in a series of meetings, 
beginning Dec. 29. We expect to organize a class in 
music, tO i be conducted by Bro. Miller, at the close of 
our meetings. We are thankful to the aid societies of 
the Newton and Pleasant Valley churches for both cloth- 
ing and money for the poor. The work at the mission 
is very encouraging. The attendance and interest are 
very good.— Jacob Funk, 1211 E. Murdock St., Wichita 
Kans., Dec. 27. 

MICHIGAN. 
Bronson.— Dec. 22, by request the writer and daughter 
drove fifteen miles to hold a few meetings with and for 
a tew isolated brethren and sisters at Findley Mich We 
were accorded the use of the Methodist house, in which 
we preached on Saturday evening and Sunday, both morn- 
ing and evening Six members were present and a num- 
ber of others who are hungering for the Bread of Life 
On Sunday evening we had a very interesting audience 
Ihey want more preaching, and we promised to return 
again in four weeks.— Martin Hardman, Bronson, Mich 
Dec. 24. 

Middleton.— At our Christmas services to-day we lis- 
tened to a very earnest and impressive discourse from 
our elder, C. S. Wilkins. At this meeting the St. Joseph 
mission was remembered to the amount of $6.13, which 
wc sent to-day. Our Christian Workers' meetings are 
growing in interest as well as are our Sunday school and 
regular preaching services.— J. W. Chambers, Middleton, 
Mich., Dec. 25. 

MISSOURI. 
Brady.-Bro P. I Fike was with us Saturday evening 
and Sunday. Dec 15 and 16, preaching two sermons for 
us. Bro. J. J. Wassam will be with us again the second 
Sunday of next month. Our Sunday school (the Attie 
school) is prospering. Our membership has increased 
by four— two by baptism and two have moved in from 
Indiana— since August, making a membership of seven 
encouraged.— Thos. Hamilton, Brady, Mo Dec 



school 
fore 1902. 



Mt. 



Iowa 



26. 



C. Kindy, 



g-g-jrTK rW h ^tsom^ose"tn a ly'-Sg' 
Fountain church met in council Dec 15 !„ ,1 ' ■ 



KANSAS. 

H E M r ?" k '~ ? ur , se "? s ,"' meetings, conducted by Bro 
II. M. Barwick, closed last evening. Bro Barwirk 1-, 
bored very earnestly, preaching, in all. twenty-one se'r- 
nTsfof Cod ';""" ° f »'«<,mce,i„gs. through Ve got,, 
bantis,,, T|- - e " y ° l ' ng S °" S PUt °" Christ >" Christia 

ma M,n' C "'n : " i:CS r, ra , ,,gC ;, fr0m elevc " «° si * l «''- 
ma J. Modlin, Burr Oak, Kans., Dee. 24. 

Fredonia church met in council, Dec 22 
Root presided. Election of 
officers. Ou: 



-Em- 



Eld. E. D. 
church and Sunday-school 



... elder. E. D. Root, goes to Independ. 
, "rstcif Uie^year, leaving a 



clio=e Eld. E. E.- Joyce for one 

as foreman. E.J. Sell was reelected Sund 

mtendent. Three church lett. 

and family did much 



caney here. The church 

and Bro.'W. B. Sell 

'ay-school super- 

ere granted. Eld. Root 

good work for the Lord's cause at 



^^y^«^™°™^ 



Sto-SS^^^":^'^ 



house, 



raise unless we get Ye I p."' We'expectToTa,"' 1 " ^ '""> '° 

meno — r*t_: r ° have our meeting 

following 
Bedel. R. 

Nappanee church met in co 
Sanger, our elder, was with us and conducted "' S ' 



. .^ - „.> treat 

Recitations were eiven hv 

some_of the juvenile classes.-Kate Sell, Fredonif ; Kans 



given by the Stinda 



wrte5-S=SSS;F 



Dec. 28. 

Garden City.- 



Wc feel 
18. 

Bower Mills.— We now live thirty miles south of Jerico 
Springs. We sold our property there and moved here 
last June, hut I still go back to Cedarville to preach We 
are located here only for the time being until we pur- 
chase property somewhere. Our desire is to locate where 
we may be of use to the Master.— Samuel Weimer, R. F 
D. No. 1, Box 65, Bower Mills, Mo., Dec. 26. 

Cross Timbers.— This is an isolated place, fifteen miles 
tram any Brethren church; no members here but wife 
daughter and myself. We are planning, the Lord willing' 
o organize a Sunday school at this place Dec. 30, to be 
known as the Oak Grove Sunday school. We Want to 
get things in readiness so that we can begin Jan. 6, 1907 
— c. b. Green, Cross Timbers, Mo., Dec. 27. 

NEBRASKA. 

R^ Xe ." !r r- <: 'rJ ! , r - ch met in cou , ncil Dcc " 22 > at *•« home of 
Bro_ L. C Klinzman, near McCool Junction, Nebr. Bro. 
„ R"throck, our elder, was present and conducted the 
council. Bro. John Jordan, of Exeter, Nebr., was also 
present Two letters were granted. Bro. Rothrock 
preached m the McCool Baptist church Dec 23 both 
morning and evening, to very large and attentive con- 
gregations. Bro. J. E. Young preached a very interesting 
ami soul-inspiring sermon on Dec. 19. at the Baptist 
church ,n McCool. We would be glad to have those 
brethren who chance to travel through this part of the 
State to stop and preach for us. We are but few in num- 
ber, but wc need the Gospel preached in its purity.— J M 
Higgmsbotham, McCool Junction, Nebr., Dec. 22 

Silver Lake church met in council Dec. 1. Bro I I 
Kindig presided. One of our deacons. Bro». Thomas 
Lvans and wife, were granted a church letter 
moved onto a farm near Kearney.— Mary A.' 
Roseland, Nebr.. Dec. 20. 



they 
Grabill, 



•Our 



>, closed'.Der22 , S a a t hie m - ,i " 8S " Wl, ; ch bC? "'" 



• ^ feast. 

*'v^" y z"'v%l" : ' 1 ,,elp ch,rin K thc meeting 
lor Bro. S. E. Thompson, did th. 
added to the Fold. Forty-five 
tahleat the feast. Bro. D. Ha 



Not being 



the meet ,, ,i n t A • , °' "■ "amm. of Re 

meet a „<j Bro. J. Crist, of the Prairie View cht, 



able 

.. . our pas- 

e preaching. One was 

urrounded the I ord's 

m, of Rockyford, Colo 



rch 



were pres- 



NORTH DAKOTA. 

M? a b, d s,n C J ll,rC " m " '" c i°," ,,c i! Dec ' 22 at the Zi ° n house. 
„," ' "" S a"c aS "'"'"h'y disposed of. Five members 
and wife "n ( C ., Ur f' 1 ,e "/ r ' ° ur cldcr ' Isa ac Miller, 
The ^1,1 a r r ly T' C - fm a willter visit in Indiana 

The greatly-feared fuel famine was averted in good time 

Dak dT'"^ are s ">ol<'"<?--M, P. Lichty 5 Zion, N 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



13 



White Rock.— On Christmas day we met at the church 
jn the morning for exercises. The program consisted of 
prayers, singing, essays, recitations suitable for the oc- 
casion, and short talks by Brethren J. E. Joseph and L. S. 
Shatto. A free-will offering of $'j,08 was taken up and 
will he sent to the Minneapolis mission. — Hannah Dun- 
ning, Denbigh, N. Dak., Dec. 26. 
OHIO. 
Covington.— I am but voicing the sentiment of many 
when I say we have been enjoying mountain-top* ex- 
periences since Dec. 1. Bro. Bollinger closed his 
meetings with us on the evening of Dec. 18. with three 
accessions. The Sunday-school teachers' institute, Dec. 
24-28, was largely attended. — Oma Karn, Covington, 
Ohio', Dec. 28. ^ 

Herring.— Bro. D. Crist came to the County Line 
church, Nov. 25, and commenced a series of meetings, 
continuing until Dec. 23. A good interest was manifest- 
ed from the start and also good attendance. Sixteen were 
added to the church by baptism, and others were almost 
ready to come.— A. M. Baker, R. F. D. No. 1, Herring, 
Ohio, Dec. 24. 

Hickory Grove. — Our series of meetings, conducted by 
Bro. Daniel Sncll, of Sidney, I ml.', closed on Thursday 
evening, Dec. 20. There were twenty-three sermons, in- 
cluding ~a communion at which Bro, Snell officiated, Dec. 
17. Three precious souls were baptized. The close of 
the year is here and we glance backward and count twen- 
ty-three members received by baptism since the beginning 
of 1906. Our Thanksgiving collection was $20.96, which 
was sent to the Brooklyn mission. — Ella J. Neher, R. F. 
D. No. 4, Tippecanoe City, Ohio, Dec. 24. 

Lima. — Three more dear souls were added to the church 
by baptism Dec. 9, making ten in all this winter. The 
church met in council Friday evening, Dec. 14, with our 
elder, J. R. Spacht, presiding. Bro. S. D. Driver was also 
present. Officers were elected for the coming year. Bro. 
C. S. Lehman was elected superintendent of the Sunday 
school, and Bro. J. M. Eavey assistant. Sister Gertrude 
Shiflctt was elected president of the Christian Workers' 
meeting and Bro. Milton Hottle vice-president.— Minnie 
Jacobs, 325 S. Pine St., Lima, Ohio, Dec. 20. 

Ludlow. — Our series of meetings at Red River, conduct- 
ed by Bro. B. F. Petry, is now in progress. At a special 
council Dec. 18, Bro. Willis Kreider was reelected Sun- 
day-school superintendent and Bro. Whitney Snyder as- 
sistant. The topics of a Christian Workers' meeting were 
used very profitably at our local Sunday-school meeting, 
held at Painter Creek, Dec. 16. Bro. Geo. D. Zollers 
expects to begin a scries of meetings at Painter Creek, 
Jan. 3. Our local Bible normal will be conducted by 
Bro. G. M. Lauver. at the Pitsburg bouse, from Feb. 9 
to the 16th. — Levi Minnich, Greenville, Ohio, Dec. 21. 

OKLAHOMA. 
Frederick.— Bro. Ira Eby came to ; us Nov. 7 and 
preached twenty-two sermons, twelve in the Warren dis- 
trict and ten iri Bro. Fillmore's district. The weather 
was very bad, yet we had a fair attendance, and believe 
many good and lasting impressions were made. Three 
were baptized, with more "almost persuaded." Bro. Eby 
also preached one funeral sermon.— Edna Cooper, Fred- 
erick, Okla., Dec. 22. 

Greer.— The Bright Sunday school has elected her of- 
ficers for six months, P. S. Hartman, Jr.. superintendent, 
and J, O. Hartman assistant. Our school is not large, 
but it is alive in the work. At present we meet for both 
Sunday school and preaching services in a cottage, as we 
have no stove in the schoolhouse, or fuel during the coal 
panic. But at our iiomes we burn cotton seed and cotton 
stalks.— P. S. Hartman, R. D. 2, Reed, Okla., Dec. 27. 

Mt. Hope church met in council Dec. 22, Bro. Ritter 
presiding. Our Sunday school was reorganized. Sister 
Ritter was reelected superintendent, Bro. Meeks assistant. 
On Christmas night we had Christmas exercises at the 
church. At the close a treat was given the Sunday-school 
scholars.— H. H. Ritter, R. R. 4, Crescent, Okla., Dec. 26. 
New Hope church convened in council Dec. 22, our 
elder, D. E. Cripe, being present. We elected new of- 
ficers for the coming year. One was reclaimed. Bro. 
Cripe preached for us Dec. 22 and 23.— Ella Troxel, R. D. 
1, McComb, Okla., Dec. 26. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 
Carlisle.— Bro. Mitchell Stover, of Waynesboro, held a 
two weeks' meeting at the Huntsdale house, in the Up- 
per Cumberland district. His sermons were very prac- 
tical and impressive as well as soul-inspiring. Four pre- 
cious souls confessed Christ and were baptized. Our love 
feast, ministerial and Sabbath-school meetings were full 
of interest and well attended. Our Thanksgiving offering 
of $25 proves to us that our people are alive to the noble- 
work of missions.— A. A. Evans. R. F. D. No. 8, Carlisle, 
Pa., Dec. 24. 

Elizabethtown..— Our church council convened Dec 27. 
Eld G N. Falkenstein presided. Eld. I. N. H. Beahm 
delivered a brief indoctrinating talk. On Dec. 16 two 
young men, both students at Elizabethtown College, were 
received into the church by baptism. Bro. A. L. B. Mar- 
tin preached a Christmas sermon to this congregation 
on the evening of that day.— Martha Martin, Elizabeth- 
town, Pa., Dec. 28. 

Mechanics Grove.— Since our last writing we have had 
both joy and sadness; joy because of the many rich feasts 
we have been permitted to enjoy. Bro. J. M. Mohler, of 
Lewistown, Pa., was with us two weeks and fed us with 
the Bread of Life. The attendance and attention were 
both very good. Dec. 23 Bro. I. N. H. Beahm, who has 
just returned from his trip to Palestine, was with us and 
spoke very touchingly about the land of our Savior. We 
were made very sorry when we learned that the ring 
which we formed at our last love feast was so soon bro- 
ken by the death of our dear brother. J. Y. King, who 
labored so earnestly and faithfully for this our little 
church.— Mary P. Habecker, R. F. D. No. 3, Cjuarryville, 
Pa., Dec. 24. 

Non-istown church held a special Sunday-school service 
on Sunday, preparatory to Christmas. In connection 
with recitations by the school, an address was delivered 
by Sister Elizabeth Myers, who is a member of the fac- 
ulty at Elizabethtown College. The talk was a "tjing 
one for the occasion, and was much enjoyed by all. Ihe 
collection was good. Three were received by church let- 
ter at the evening services. Others are to be received 
later, and some who have delayed handing in their let- 



ters. It would be much better if churches would heed 
the decision of the Annual Conference on the certificate 
question, rather than pass decisions in their local- church- 
es defeating proper and safe church government. In cit- 
ies and towns no member should be any length of time 
without a church letter. — T. F. Imler, Nornstown, Pa., 
Dec. 27. 

York.— On the 9th inst., Bro. B. F. Lightncr, of Gettys- 
burg, Pa., was with us. Me preached two interesting ser- 
mons. Interesting, because of the practical truths they 
contained. Bro. Lightncr believes in preaching plain 
truths, and does not use much "filler" in his discourses. 
Bro. Albert Hollinger. of Virginia, also stopped with us 
last Friday, and preached a very edifying sermon. Bro. 
Hollinger is well acquainted here, having held a series of 
meetings for us some years ago. We were glad to have 
him with us once again. — Abrain S. Hershey, York, Pa., 
Dec. 17. 

Heassnt Hill. — A scries of meetings was held, at the 
Beaver Creek house by Eld. J. H. Longanecker, of Pal- 
myra. Pa., beginning Dec. 6- and closing Dec. 18. He de- 
livered fifteen very interesting sermons. We feel that he 
has strengthened the church spiritually. While there 
were no accessions, yet much good seed was sown and 
many good impressions left. — Lucy E. Danner. Abbotts- 
town, Pa.. Dec. 21. 

Reading. — On Christmas' evening our Sunday school 
held its Christmas services. These services were for the 
most part in the hands of the little ones, who, we all 
know, received one of the primary blessings on that mem- 
orable night in the city of David. We feel that our 
prayers are answered in that a great interest in church 
and Sunday-school work is manifested. Saturday even- 
ing, Jan. 5, we will hold our quarterly council. We are 
having a series of song services under the leadership of 
Bro. Linn Nies, from Lititz, Pa.— Henry H. Moyer, 834 
N. 6th St.. Reading, Pa., Dec. 26. 

Upper Conowago. — Our series of meetings, conducted 
by Eld. Albert Hollinger. at the Baker house, closed 
Thursday evening, Dec. 13. The attendance and attention 
were very good. Four were received by baptism. Bro. 
Hollinger was witli us a little over three weeks. He also 
delivered a very interesting sermon on Thanksgiving day 
in the Berlin house, after which an offering for missions 
was taken, amounting to $24.83.— Andrew Bowser, East 
Berlin, Pa., Dec. 24. 

West Johnstown congregation met in council Dec. 20, 
in the Morrellville house, our eider, J. Frank Dietz, pre- 
siding. Two letters were received and three were grant- 
ed. The organization for the new year was effected. 
The officers were all reelected. During the year there- 
have been five services within the congregation each Sun- 
day. We have four evergreen Sunday schools. There 
have been thirty accessions by baptism during the year.— 
H S Replogle, 1316 Virginia Ave., Johnstown, Pa., Dec. 
22. 

TENNESSEE 
Hickerscn Grove church met. in council Dec. 19. We 
had a very pleasant meeting. Our Sunday school was re- 
organized. Bro. A. C. Young was reelected superintend- 
ent and Sister Margaret Harrison assistant. We have 
twenty members at this place, and the average attendance 
of our Sunday school this year was thirty-live.— Bettie 
Neff, R. F. D.'No. 2, Tullahoma, Tenn., Dec. 26. 

VIRGINIA. 

Beaver Creek church met in council Dec. 22, our elder 
presiding. Brethren Jesse Booth and Richard Reed were 
advanced to the second degree of the ministry. Bro. 
H I. Woodic, of Beldon, N. C, was with us and has since 
given us five excellent sermons.— Minnie Hurst, Dulany, 
Va., Dec. 26. 

Troutville.— Eld. S. A. Honberger is now laboring for 
the Master in the Botetourt church. He has conducted 
two series of meetings for us and will begin another at 
our Trinity house, Dec, 30. He has done some excellent 
work among us. Some have been baptized and others 
await the rite. Sister Honberger accompanied him.— 
C. D. Hylton, Troutville, Va.. Dec. 28. 
WISCONSIN. 

Worden church held a Christmas and missionary pro- 
gram Christmas morning. Bro. W. H. Byer was with us 
and gave us a Christmas sermon in the afternoon; and a 
missionary sermon in the evening. The services were 
well attended and much appreciated by all. A collection 
of $14 was taken.— Mamie Buckingham, Worden, Wis., 
Dec. 26. 



DEATH OF ELDER URIAS D. BRAUCHER. 

Bro. Braucher died in the bounds of the Middle Creek 
church. Somerset county, Pa., Dec. 7, 1906, at the age of 
61 years, S months and 17 days. His death has brought 
sadness to those who learned to love him, which was 
shown by the large attendance at his funeral. 

Dec. 3 he left his home at Somerset, Pa., to drive to 
the home of his nephew, Bro. Wm. S. Braucher, near 
Kingwood, Pa. When about six miles from home he 
was stricken with paralysis, on the highway, and when 
found was almost frozen. He was taken to a house near 
by, but never recovered. Bro. Braucher was born near 
Berlin, Pa., April 9, 1845. He came to the home of Eld. 
C. G. Lint, of Meyersdale, Pa., when about seventeen 
years old, ami learned the blacksmith trade. 

Jan. 7, 1866, he was married to Barbara Hostetler, who 
alone survives him. He united with the church in 1870. 
In about the year 1881 he was elected to the ministry. 
In ISS5 he moved from Meyersdale onto a farm in Som- 
erset township, near Somerset, where he resided until 
about five years ago, when he sold his farm and became a 
resident of Somerset. 

In 1902 he was ordained to the eldership. He was a 
good counsellor, his motto being " Peace." His sermons 
were full of good common sense and logic. He was 
chorister, and taught several terms of vocal music. He 
was laid to rest in the Husband cemetery. Funeral serv- 
ices in the German Reformed church, by Eld. D. H. Walk- 
er, from 2 Samuel 14: 14, assisted by the writer. 

Bills, Pa., Dec. 26. Silas Hoover. 



CORRESPONDENCE 



"Write what thou seest. and send it unto the churches." 



FROM WADDAMS GROVE. ILLINOIS. 



FULTON AVENUE CHURCH, BALTIMORE. MD. 



A six o'clock morning service on Christmas makes more 
real the anniversary of onr dear Savior's birth. If you 
do not believe it, just try it by having a special early 
service on Christmas morning, and you will then appre- 
ciate the joy experienced by a little band of members 
and friends in the Fulton Avenue church this Christmas 
morning. 

To-night our Sunday school held its annual Christmas 
meeting, in which some of our scholars recited and sang 
appropriate words for such meetings. Though the streets 
were icy and it was raining, wc had our church well filled, 
thereby showing that many arc interested m our work 
at this place for our beloved Brotherhood. 

A box of nice clothing from the Sisters' Aid Society 
of Spring Creek, Va., and $5 from the Missionary Circle 
of Elizabethtown College, Pa., arc most thankfully re- 
ceived for our work at this place. God knows and will 
duly reward the givers of these needed tokens of love. 

Tile work for 1907 is already outlined, and we press for- 
ward to excel in every way all previous years' records 
for the Master's work at this place. J. S. Geiser. 

16117 Edmondson Ave., Dec. 27. 



PROGRAM OF BIBLE AND SUNDAY SCHOOL 

INSTITUTE TO BE HELD AT McPHERSON 

COLLEGE. JANUARY 20-27, 1907. 



A very successful Bible institute was held during the 
holidays in the above congregation. The meeting was 
conducted by Bro. J. E. Miller, president of Mt. Morris 
College. I was privileged to attend a few sessions of 
this meeting, and regretted very much my inability to get 
it all, for it was a very helpful meeting. The attendance 
and interest were excellent, and it cannot fail to be of 
great benefit to the church. Bro. Miller's evening dis- 
courses were very practical. This is the first meeting 
of the kind that has ever been held in this church, and 
it has given the members, wc think, new inspiration in a 
systematic study of God's Word. 

It had been previously arranged that during this meet 
ing an election would be held for some deacons. This 
took place on Christmas day, after the morning session 
Brethren Albert Myers. Fred Broze. Frank Starr and 
Harry Bogenrief were called to fill .the important posi- 
tion They with their wives were installed. Bro. Miller 
officiating in the installation. These arc all active and 
faithful members, and the church has reasons to believe 
that their presence and help in the official body are go- 
ing to add strength and force to the working power of 
the church. May they ever be faithful and the Watldams 
Grove church ever be as a city that is set on a hill. 
Rockford. 111., Dec. 29. I' R- Keltner. 



1 Lectures by Albert C. Wicand, President of Bethany 
Bible School, twice each Sunday and each evening during 
the week. The subjects are as follows: 

ll) The Lord's Prayer. 

(2) Varieties and Methods of Bible Study. 

(3) Fundamental Principles Concerning the Ordinances, 
or Sacraments of the Church Taught in the New Testa- 
ment. 

(4) The Inner Meaning and Spiritual Observance of 
the Communion (treated from a scriptural standpoint). 

(5) A Study of the Scriptural Teaching Concerning 
Feet-Washing as a Church Ordinance. 

(61 The Scriptural Teaching and Spiritual Significance 
of the Lord's Supper. 

(71 The Anointing of the Sick with Oil. 

(8) The Fundamental and Formative Principles— His- 
torically and Practically— of the Brethren Church. 

I'll The Christian Adornment, or a Study of the Scrip- 
tural Teaching Concerning Simplicity of Dress. 

(10) The Prayer Veil, or, The Uncovered and the Veiled 
Head in Praying or Prophesying. 

2. Day studies throughout the week by Bro. Wieand in: 

(1) Lesson Planning, or Religious Pedagogy, for Sun- 
day-school and Bible Teachers. 

(2) The Art of Soul Winning, or " Individual Work 
for Individuals." 

3 Bible studies each day by Edward Frantz. President 
of McPherson College, including such subjects as the iol- 
lowing: 

(1) The Discourses of Christ. 

(2) The Shorter Epistles of St. Paul. 

(3) The Old Testament Prophets. 

4. Lesson studies each day by F. H. and Anna N 
Crumpacker, missionaries-elect to China, in Mission Work 
and Mission Problems. 

5 Addresses and studies by various instructors, as op- 
portunity offers, on such subjects as the following: 

(1) The Sunday-school Lesson Course for 1907. 

(2) Child Training and its Relation to Religious Edu- 
cation. " ,. 

(3) The Psychological Basis of Church Ordinances. 

(4) Principles of Church Government. 
McPherson, Kans.. Dec. 27. Edward Frantz. 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



ON BOARD THE S. S. CEDRIC. 



To the Brethren and Sisters in America, Greeting: — 

We are due at Gibraltar to-day, but having lost some 
time on the way we shall not reach the famous fortress 
until to-morrow morning. 

On Thanksgiving day at 4: 30 P. M. our large lodging 
and boarding house for two weeks to come quietly and 
peacefully cut loose from Pier 48 at New York City. Sev- 
eral of our Brooklyn City Mission folks stood on the pier 
and watched us until we receded from their view. Bro. 
E. C. Miller, of South Bend, Ind., a brother to Sister 
Ella, was there also to cheer us on our way. It was a new 
experience to us all, taking leave from our home and na- 
tive land, yet we took our leave with no misgivings, for 
we felt that this is God's world, every part of it, that he 
is just as near to us on the sea as on the land, that he will 
be just as precious to us in India as in the United States. 
The Cedric is a superb steamer, being a twin to the 
Celtic. It is seven hundred feet long, has a seventy-five 
foot beam, and a tonnage of 21,000. It has accommoda- 
tions for something over 3,000 passengers. The larger 
number of these belong to the third class, more commonly 
called " steerage." Practically ail of the passengers of 
this class on this voyage are Italians. They are going to 
Italy to spend the winter, and the money which they have 
made in America. Their money goes so much farther in 
Italy than in America and besides they claim they do not 
like the winters in New York. For the most part this 
class is made up of men, although one does see a few 
women and children among them. 

The second-class passengers are with a few exceptions 
also made up of Italians. There are a few Jews, one Rus- 
sian, a couple of Filipinos and seven Americans. We 
Americans, the Filipinos, and two Englishmen have a table 
to ourselves in the dining room. This makes it quite 
pleasant for us, for we can talk each to the other. And 
besides the Italians naturally seem to be very noisy. I 
have noticed one very commendable trait in the Italians. 
The fathers are real fatherly and thus relieve the mother 
of many cares. The mothers, however, seem at home in 
the matter of discipline. 

The sailing has not been so very bad at any time. Yes- 
terday and to-day there has been a steady northeast wind, 
which sways the ship somewhat. We stopped at the 
Azores Islands five hours Thursday morning, but only first 
class passengers were allowed ashore. We got, however, 
a splendid view of St. Michael's Island, this being one of 
the group. Several boats of fruit venders rowed out to 
the vessel and did a good business with the third class 
passengers. Poor fellows! I suppose they had not seen 
any fruit since leaving New York. They bought many 
oranges, bananas and pineapples, which they hauled up in 
little baskets by means of a rope. 

Did we get seasick? I fancy I hear many of you asking 
this question. Why of course we did? Did not many of 
the former missionaries tell us that it was the only proper 
thing to do? We took them at their word. We are all 
getting along nicely. 

We received a large number of letters on board the Ced- 
ric. We certainly appreciated them, for they were full of 
comfort and good cheer. We take this opportunity of 
our dear friends for their kind remembrances 
when opportunity affords try to answer them 
Ella Miller, 
Josephine Powell, 
C. H. Brubaker. 



remaining amount to be used in supplying the temporal 
needs of the poor. 

•Dec. 13 was a special council, where two deacons were 
to be chosen, but the result was the following four: N. E. 
Miller, Jacob Miller, John Cupp and Samuel Boyer. All 
were installed except Bro. Cupp and wife, who were not 
at home at the time. 

On the evening of Dec. 20 we had a called members' 
meeting at the church in town, preparatory to a series of 
meetings,' which is to begin at that place Dec. 26. Bro. 
W. F. England, of Ashland, Ohio, is to preach. 

We have two good Sunday schools and Christian Work- 
ers' meeting in the congregation. The country Sunday 
school and Christian Workers combined gave a Christ- 
mas program on Sunday night before Christmas. 

Mary E. Neher. 
North Manchester, Ind., Dec. 24. 



NINETEENTH ANNUAL BIBLE INSTITUTE 
BRIDGEWATER COLLEGE. 



This institute will be held in the colli 
water, Va., Jan. 14-25, 1907. 



ge chapel, Bridge- 



SCHEDXTLE OF CLASS WOBK. 



1, The 



^innings of True Religion.— Prof. J. H. Cllne. 
Keligious Problems of Everyday Experience.— 



' Sunday-school Teachers. — Eld. T. S. 



Som._ _. 
Prof. TV. I. T. Hnuvei 

3. Training Class i\. 
Molierman. 

■i. Homiletlcs.— Eld. T. S. Molierman 

o. Hymn Music. — Conducted by Prof. C. W. Roller. 

Special Work, Lectures. Etc. 
Missionary Work. — Galen B. Royer. 

~urpose of Christian Education. 



and 



■Eld. 
Early. 



The Need 
<-\ Flory. 

n- J, he M ission of the Brethren Church.— Eld. H 
9. The Ministerial Call.— Eld. E. D. Kendlg- 
10. Ihoroufihness. — Eld. J. M. Kagey 

H n Tl1 '' w 0la , tl0, J \ h " -. BiM - ^'..rk "Should Sustain towards 
e Other Work of the College.— Eld. H. G Miller 

Louisiana as a Mission Field for the Brethren.— Prof 



two daughters and one stepson. She united with the 
Brethren church about forty years ago. Her sickness was 
of long duration. Funeral at the Courier church, con- 
ducted by Eld. Irvin Fisher, assisted by Eld. Thomas, of 
the United Brethren church. Text, Rev 14- 12 13 In- 
terment in the cemetery nearby. Emma 6. Earhart. 

Fisher, Sister Anna Mary, wife of Bro. A. L. Fisher, died 
at her home in Mount Pleasant, Pa., Dec. 10, 1906 of ty- 
phoid fever aged 41 years, 9 months and 22 days. She 
leaves a husband and eight children. Funeral services bv 
the writer at Mt. Joy church, from Rev. 14: 13. 

H. A. Stahl. 
Fouts, Isaac, born in Preble county, Ohio, died in North 
Manchester, Ind., Dec. 10, 1906, of pneumonia, aged 72 
years 10 months and 27 days. He was visiting with his 
son John H., at the time of his death. He was married 
in Wabash county, Indiana, Jan 7, 1858, to Diana Hoff To 
this union were born three sons and one daughter He 
and his companion united with the German Baptist Breth- 
ren church in 1860. The mother preceded him in death 
eleven years. He leaves four children. Funeral services 
at the Mexico church by Eld. Frank Fisher, assisted by 
others. Interment in the cemetery nearby. 

Emma O. Earhart. 
Gouker, John W., born in Hagerstown, Md., died at his 
home near Middlebury, Ind., Dec. 17, 1906, aged 62 years 
8 months and 23days. He is survived by a wife and two 
daughters. Services conducted by the writer, assisted by 
Bro. J. L. Mishler. j H Fjke ' 

Harvey, Hannah, died in the bounds of the Dry Fork 
church, Jasper Co., Mo., Nov. 29, 1906, aged 73 years, 3 
months and 6 days. In 1849 she united with the Brethren 

S«S T'™ 1?« h i$5 V s a faithful ™mber until her 
death. March 23, 1854, she was married to W. M. Harvey 
in Allen county, Ohio. The same year they moved to 
Keokuk county, Iowa. In 1S69 they moved to Jasper coun- 
ty, Missouri, on the farm where they resided until she was 
overtaken by death. Services by Eld. Geo. Barnhart 
the Dry Fork church. 



Mo he 



J. M. Coffman. 

Florv H ° W t0 Conduct a Successful Revival.— Geo. W. Flor 

14. Evangelistic Services, each e- 
man. 

m .,, „ Expenses. 

Tuition, Free. 

Board, furnished room, heat, light, (to the extent 
capacity) per week, .$2.75. ' 

Single meal tickets, 15 cents. 

Four meal tickets, 50 cents. 



MA TRIMONIAL 



" What therefore God has foiued together, let not man put asunder/' 
Marriage notices ehoula be nccompa nied by BO centa 

Betz-Arnold.— At the residence of the groom's parents 
Cavalier Co., N Dak., Dec. 16, 1906, Bro. Wilber Bctz, 
of Newville, and Sister Hattie Arnold, of Warrensburg 

Mo., by the undersigned. J. Will Shively. 

• Eberly-Meck.—At the home of the bride's parents, Oc- 
tavia, Butler Co Nebr., Dec. 23, 1906, Mr. Abraham Eber- 
ly and Sister Mary Ann Meek, both of Octavia, Nebr 

by the unders.gned. J. L . Suavely. " 

Ml!Z y i T ~ K{ TT A ^ thc ,l 10m , e of the bride ' s P^n's near 

Middlebury Ind., Dec. 23, 1906, Bro. Clarence F. Troye, 

Sister Dessie D. Kime. J. H. *"' 



.Mill 



Fike. 



thank 
and w 
all. 



FALLEN ASLEEP 




Dec. 8. 



DEATH OF JOHN SAYLER, OF BEAVERDAM 
MARYLAND. 



He was a deacon in the Beaverdam church, and died 
Nov. 1, 1906, at the age of 85 years and 6 months. He was 
the last member who bore the Sayler name in the church 
so far as I know. He was a cousin of Eld. D. P. Sayler, 
a nephew of Eld. Jacob Sayler and a grandson of Eld.' 
Daniel Sayler, whose father was baptized by Eld. Martin 
Urner, 1754, in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and moved 
to Maryland in 1770. 

The subject of this notice led an exemplary life out of 
the church, trying to persuade himself that such a life 
would be sufficient, until about the age of sixty, when he 
was hurt by one of his horses. He then sent for me and 
asked to be baptized, saying morality is not enough to give- 
hope when death tomes. At his request he was baptized, 
and had a love feast at his own .home. The Lord added 
twenty-five years to his life. The church elected him to 
the office of deacon, in which office he served faithfully 
for twenty years. He was anointed and died in peace. 
His funeral was improved by the brethren, in the Beaver- 
dam church, and his remains were laid to rest in the cem- 
etery adjoining. E w S( 

Dec. 22. 



I f ?' S 'S" A ',"" e ', w,fe cf Bro - Jonathan Bare, died of 
0^ ° j b 'A at l,er h „ om< = near Waynesboro, Pa., Dec 12 
wlit' ,h ge R 7 i yMrS \ 9 r"!" 8 and 2i AW- She united 

f„ ', n"" d M rcl1 ) vhen yoa "Z ard »' as «ry zeal- 
ous for its welfare. Not often was she absent from divine 
serv.ee. She is survived by her husband, three daughters 
and one son, all of whom are in the church. Services were 
he d ,n Price church, conducted by Elder J. B Ruthrauff 
Inlerment m graveyard adjoining. Sudie M. Wingert. ' 

1 B,a ? sten ' , Sis 'f Margaret, died Dec. 13, 1906, in the 
bounds of the Pipe Creek church, Carroll to., Md aged 
85 years and 6 months. Funeral held at the Pine Creek 
church, and interment in the cemetery adjoining Occa- 
sion improved by the writer. Text, Job 5: 26 

E. W. Stoner. 
Braun, 



Braun, Sister Mary, nee Shutt, born in Germany, died 
, ", !?"",, ,n ,o R l bln5 ' \™*< D .«' V- W06, aged 60 y year\! 



onths and 19 days. Her husband, one son, one daugh 
',■"'',•. °.1 e b „ roth , er and . onc sisler snr ™= "en She united 
will the Brethren church about fourteen years 
died hi triumphs of a living faith in Christ. Funeral' ct 
ducted by the undersigned, from Ps. 103: 15, ,<; rai to ' 

D.' W. Miller. 

i , ^ S,s ,'? r i y, ary ' died Dec - 13 > '906. She 
h-zed Dec. 11. She was the oldest member 
Creek congregation, Roanoke Co., Va be 
of her death 92 years, 8 



and 



ivas para- 
the Peter's 
being at the tin 



Mrs. Eliza Naff, resides. Funeral 
Peters Creek church by S. Crumpacker, 
J. t. Brubaker, from Matl. 24: 44 Sh 
Abram Eller, March 31, 1831 



FROM NORTH MANCHESTER, INDIANA. 



eleven childn 



She 



ughte 

i, Dec. 15 at 

S. Miller and 

as married to 

to this union were born 



o 

owl 
Our 



Thanksgiving services were held at the church in 
town. Bro. G. L. Studebaker preached to a full house 
collection amounted to $42.20, out of which our poor 
members are supplied with the Gospel Messenger, the 



: is survived by seven children 
-,..',, , t D.. C. Naff. 

English, Amanda, born in Licking county, Ohio, died at 
her home near Peru, Miami Co., Ind., Dee 8, 1906 aged 
60 years, 11 months and 5 days. When but two years of 
age she, with her parents, moved to Miami county Indt 
ana in which county she has completed her life. May 15 
1873, she w ; as united in marriage to Zeri M. Baldwin with 
whom she lived about fourteen years. She leaves one son 



D. W. Teeter. 
Hegre, Melia, born at Rock Creek, 111., died at the home 
?or£ er ""ending Physician, at Lake Park, Iowa, Nov. 22, 
,r',? f ,- tl,bercul0MS of " ,e bone - For nine weeks and a 
Halt Melia was a great sufferer. She never identified her- 
self with any church, but requested to be baptized into 
the Brethren church as soon as she grew better Funeral 
services were held in the Presbyterian church at Lake 
Park, conducted by Bro. Joshua Schechter. 

Jessie I. Metz. 
Jones, Bro. John, born in Miami county, Ohio, died in 
the bounds of Mississinewa congregation, Delaware Co., 
Ind., Dec. 17, 1906, aged 68 years and 2 days. He was 
united in marriage with Harriet, Kline, Oct. 11 1860 To 
this union were born one son and two daughters About 
sixteen years ago he united with the Brethren church in 
the Harttord congregation, Indiana, and some time after 
was elected to the office of deacon, after which he became 
afflicted and remained so until death. He leaves a wife 
one son, three half brothers and two half sisters. Funeral 
conducted in Eaton, Ind., by Eld. A. C. Young. 

John F. Shoemaker. 
Long, Sister Lizzie, wife of Bro. Levi Long, died at Ga r : 
™ inn?" ln '",e liounds of the Berlin congregation, Nov. 
20, 1906, aged 45 years, 10 months and 10 days. She was 
a consistent member of the church of the Brethren Her 
remains were laid to rest in the Berlin cemetery. Services 
in the Berlin Progressive house by the undersigned, from 
1 Cor ' 1S: S1 - W. G. Schrock. 

Nees Sister Anna Edna, of the Logan congregation, 
Ohio, died of tuberculosis, Dec. 7, 1906, at Alainogordo, 
New Mexico aged 20 years, 5 months and 20 days. In 
September, 1906, she went to New Mexico in search of 
health accompanied by her mother and friend. She united 
with the church Aug. 8, 1901, and lived a consistent life 
Funeral services conducted by Bro. S. Z. Smith, assisted 
by Brethren Abednego Miller and B. F. Snyder. Text 
Rev - 6: 8 - Bertha Lee Yoder. 

Roop, Herbert, son of Bro. John H. and Sister Annie 
Roop, in New Windsor, Md., died Dec. 19, 1906 of Bright's 
disease, aged 18 years, 7 months and 25 days. Funeral dis- 
■urse by the writer and others in the Pipe Creek church. 
Num. 23: 10. Interment in the cemetery adjoining 
E. W. Stoner. 
Shugard, Harry Jr youngest son of Brother and Sister 
Harry Shugard, of the Germantown congregation, Phila- 
delphia died at the home of his parents, Dec 21 1906 
aged 18 years, II months and 26 days. The deceased was' 
a victim of serious burns on the arms and face caused by 
the explosion of chemicals while mixing. He was imme- 
diately conveyed to a hospital for treatment, but very soon 
scarlet fever developed which caused an early death 
Brief services were conducted at the home Dec. 23, by Bro' 
M. C. Swigart, from Matt. 14: 12. B. F. Kittinger 

Snader, Sister Fannie B„ wife of Bro. Walter Snader 
and youngest daughter of David J. Roop, in the bounds 
v,-, r„ m Pe M ehiirch, Maryland, Dec. 15, 1906, aged 34 
years 10 months and 28 days. Funeral occasion improved 
by Elder W. M. Wine and others, from I Thess. 4-13-14 
I'uneral and interment at Pipe Creek. E. W. Stoner 

Spangle, Sister Julia Ann, nee Blackmail, died near Wol- 
cott, Ind Dec. 2. 1906, aged 72 years, 8 months Ind 27 
days She was one of the early settlers of Princeton town- 
ship having moved here from Noble county with her hus- 
band, Jacob Spangle, in 1852. Shortly afterward she united 
with the Brethren. She leaves two brothers and ten chil- 
dren, hter husband and one daughter preceded her to the 
spirit world some years ago. Funeral sermon by Eld. W 
S. Tony. Text, 2 Cor. 5: 1. Cyrus Wallick. 

Wagoner, Esther daughter of David and Elizabeth Ul- 
rey, born near Buck Creek, Tippecanoe Co., Ind , died at 
S psT '" IV'nont, Ind,, Dee. 21, 1906, aged 71 years 
and 28 days. She was married to Daniel Bowman in 1855 
who died m 1858. One son was born to them. She was 
married in 1866 to John J. Wagoner, with whom she lived 
thirty-one years. She joined the German Baptist Breth- 
ren church early in life and lived faithful until death 
funeral services by Bro. J. D. Mishler, from Job 28- 17' 
Interment in Pyrmont cemetery. J. W. Vetter 

Yoder, Joseph A born in Wayne county, Ohio, died at 
bis home near Middlebury, Ind., Dec. 21, 1906 aged 57 
years, 5 months and 22 days. His wife, three children and 
two sisters survive him. Funeral services by the writer 

J. H. Fike. 



Tex 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 1907. 



15 



Crossing the Desert to 
California 

m making the trip to the Annual Meet- 

; i„~ to be held in Loa Angeles, you cross some 

' r t country, no matter what line you use, 

whether the extreme south, or a northern 

' te This cannot be avoided, regardless of 

f ™ v opinion you may hold to the contrary. 

\ Fortunately the route of the Santa Fe 

ses uut a small part of the Mojave Des- 

t which Is made in the night, but even a 

lavllght trip across the desert In the month 

of May la pleasant. The air is balmy and 

V tiie trip to many would no doubt be a nov- 

' elty; but even seen at night It is an inter- 

I <>s ting sight. 

The Santa Fe has been the official route 
for many of the large conventions held in 
I'.iii'oinia for the past decade, including the 
r'i rlsLlan Kudcavor, the Presbyterian General 
AoLmbly Methodist Conference, . Baptist 
rlnertLl Conference, National Educational As- 
sociation, etc., due to the following reasons: 
nirort line perfect service, through trains, 
mil points of historic and national inteiesl, 
n ?OUt "to California. The track is spnnkled 
I oil, making it dustless, the engines are 
oil burners,— no cinders. 

The climate during May Is i delightful, the 
mountains, hillsides and valleys are green 
Uli early summer vegetation. T tie lp will 
>, nieasant and cool on accoont of the alti- 
tudes? no dust, no cinders, no discomforts. 

The midsummer temperature taken from 
the government reports for the month of 
Tulv 1906, are as follows— route of the Santa 
we Ton ean draw your own conclusions aa 
to how much cooler it will be during the 
middle of May. 



MANY HEW CONGREGATIONS ASD tTP- 
BUILDING OP OTHERS WHifc TT1T- 
DOUBTEDL7 BESTTIiT FROM AH- 
NTJAIi MEETING IN CALI- 
FORNIA. 
When the first Annual Meeting west of the 
Missouri River was held In a park owned by 
the Union Pacific Railroad Company, In w 
known 



Kansas, 
gregations 
Colorado an 
1889, 



Altitude. Temperature. 

. .5,857 feet, 69 

. .G,<322 feet, 66 

..6,767 feet, 67 

. .7.013 feet 1*6 

..6,200 feet, 74 

. .6,649 feet, 66 

Temperature. 



,rk Grove. In Lawrenc 
1883. there were but sixteen con- 
in Kansas, none In Oklahoma or 
d but few In Nebraska. 
when the writer removed to Cali- 
fornia, there were seventy-nine congregations 
in Kansas, several in Oklahoma and Colorado 
and quite a number In Nebraska and but one 
In California. 

The Annual Meeting of 1907 will find over 
twenty congregations in California and over 
twenty-five congregations In Washington, Ore- 
gon and Idaho. 

As Elder H. C. Early of Virginia recently 
said in the Gospel Messenger, there Is no 
question but what many crowded congrega- 
tions in the east would be benefited by some 
of the ministers, deacons and members mov- 
ing into some new section of the country In 
th? west and there building up a new con- 
gregation or strengthening some weak one. 

Look around in your own congregation and 
see if there are not some who would pettei 
their condition both temporally and spiritually 
bv moving west, and then think, is It not 
Jour duty to render them every assistance 
possible to accomplish the same? Do ths 
understanding!*-, join one or the co-open at I ye 
,v uismna that will be run by the Union Pa- 
cific Railroad Company to the Annual Meet- 
ing, as they will pass through .either goin^ 
or returning) some of the congregations in 
Idaho, Oregon and California and gl 
time to visit and see for yor 
Brethren are doing. 

<? A Hutchison, Excursion Manager, 120 
Jackson Boulevard/Chicago, Illinois, will give 
you information about these excuraJOM, « 
vou can write Geo. L. McDonaugl, Co oi i Na- 
tion Agent of the Union Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany, Omaha, Nebr. 



irself what the 



New Mexico. 
Springer, 

Katon 

Las Vegas, . . 
Santa Fe, . . . 
Albuquerque, . . 
Gallup 

Arizona. Altitude. 

Flagstaff U.8S5 feet »* 

Williams 6,760 feet 67 

Prescott: 6,320 feet 74 

Write for copy of Itinerary giving complete 
information of special train arrangements for 
the meeting. If you go to the meeting this 
will interest you. 

W. J- BLACK, 
Passenger Trafflo Manager, Santa Fe, 

1117 Railway Exchange, Chicago, 111. 



Brethren Envelopes 



This is a No. 6 white envelope. On the 
back is printed the Brethren Card. 

Use Them 
and thereby help spread the truth. 

Price, per pack of 25 10 cents 

Price, per pack of 100 35 «"< s 



Webster's Imperial Dictionary 

New and Up-to-Date. Reset from New Type. Thousands of New Words. 

This is the Only New and Complete WEBSTER DICTIONARY 
Issued SINCE 1890. 

FOR IT IS THE ONLY "WEBSTER" In which common sense and discrimination have 
been shown by the editors In the uso of capitals. In the Imperial all proper names begin 
with capitals and other words with small letters. It Is strange that so important a, 
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16 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 5, 190*. 



/yor£s ./vor classifiel 

Mound Valley church met in council Dec. 22, our elder, 
J. Appleman, presiding. Three were received by letter.' 
Sunday school was organized, Sister Minnie Rodes super- 
intendent, and Bro. L. M. Dodd assistant. We decided 
to hold an election for a minister at our next regular 
council. The Sunday school had a Thanksgiving pro- 
gram and the nineteen children who had taken dimes to 
invest paid in $14.57, which was sent to the Chicago Sun- 
day-school extension fund. Also a Thanksgiving offer- 
ing of $15 was collected and sent to world-wide mission 
fund. Our elder, assisted by our home minister, W. B. 
Gish, gave us six services in the town of Thomas, one 
and one-half miles from the home church, commencing 
Dec. 21, and ending Christmas night. A collection for 
the St. Joseph mission was taken on Christmas day, 
amounting to $10.54. The meetings were held in the Jab- 
bock faith mission meetinghouse, which has been pur- 
chased by Sister Kate Smith, of West Virginia, and will 
be held by her for the church until they complete ar- 
rangements to buy it. We will now have regular preach- 
ing and Sunday school in town as well as here. We also 
have a Christian Workers' meeting once a week — A J 
Rodes, R. D. 1, Thomas, Okla., Dec. 28. 

West Johnstown.— Last night eleven of the brethren 
and sisters met at the home of an aged sister to hold a 
love feast with her. She has not been able to move from 
her chair for a number of years. We had our Christmas 
program on Sunday night in the Morrellville house. — 
H. S. Replogle, 1316 Virginia Ave., Johnstown, Pa., Dec. 



feeling the need of an elder nearer here, called Eld I B 
Wike to care for her spiritual wants, and Bro. John Apple- 
man his assistant. Bro. Appleman was with us Dec. 30 and 
delivered a very able sermon. We have no resident min- 
uter. We have a very interesting Sabbath school.— Lydia 
Duncan, Andrews, Ind., Dec. 31. 



Fostona.— We met last night in a members' meeting. 
The Sunday school was reorganized and a committee 
chosen to direct the work of the Christian Workers. We 
expect Bro. Geo. D. Zollcrs to assist us in a series of 
meetings in March. — G. A. Snider, Fostoria, Ohio, Dec. 29. 
Des Moines Valley congregation met in council Dec. 
27. We decided to hold a Bible school one year from 
now during the holidays. Bro. W. E. West was ordained 
to the eldership. Brethren I. W. Brubaker, Samuel Bow- 
ers and A. C. Snowberger were present as a committee 
on ordination. We are having some meetings this weeTc 
by our elder, S. M. Goughnour, his talks being partly 
about the land of the Bible, from which he has been home 
only a short time.— Jas. Q. Goughnour, Ankeny, Iowa, 
Dec. 28. 

Pioneer.— Eld. A. J. Nickey began a series of meetings 
t tc L ' '° conlmue indefinitely. The interest and spirit 
of the meetings are good. There is abundant opportunity 
to build homes for time, and to be a blessing. We will 
have our love feast Jan. 5.— David G. Wine, Imperial 
Nebr., Dec. 29. 

Wichita.— Since our last report five more have been 
added to the Mission church by baptism and one more 
applicant. The work goes gloriously on. Our Christmas 
services were conducted at the old church by Brethren 
Johnson and Funk. A collection of $6.85 was taken to 
be used in aiding the needy in the mission. Our series 
of meetings, to be conducted by Bro. Jacob Witmore 
will begin Dec. 29.— Susie Jacques, 1708 Wall Ave Wich- 
ita, Kans., Dec. 28. 

Kingsley church enjoyed a very profitable feast of spirit- 
ual things in the week Bro. Hoff was here conducting the 
Bible normal^ which began Dec. 15. He gave us some 
lessons on Prophecy, on Parables, on Sermon on the 
Mount, on Nonconformity andTthe Prayer Covering, and 
the work of the Holy Spirit. So-day we reinstated a sis- 
ter. Immediately afterward-.' she was anointed.— J J 
Tawzer, Kingsley, Iowa, Deer 28. 

South Bend (Second Brethren Church).— Nov. 18 we held 
our fall love feast, with a large attendance. Bro. Lafayette 
Steel officiated. Quite a number of other ministering 
brethren were present. The first Monday in December we 
held our monthly members' meeting and elected our offi- 
dem R~™ N ne n' S x ra ° nths ' S"nday- S chool superinten- 
Bro F F n'll °-M Tr0yer; P resident Christian Workers, 
t, if' ,' P ull; Messenger agent, Sister L. S. Johnson : 
church solicitor and corresponding secretary, W H John- 
t'Llsf. ° £ 9""?' mas ex «cises, we decided to hold 
a local Sunday-school convention Dec. 23 We had an 
excellent program and a splendid meeting. Bro M R 
Myers gave us two talks on original illustration. Our'dis- 

a talk on " The r° 1 V^'l^i - Laf ^»<= Steel gave 
Li u u- CaU to Teach," that resulted in some rad- 

ical changes being contemplated in our work for the next 
wLT mhS ' In *,<=. "ening we had a round table from 
w Tinned Tl m8S m"^ S ! ea " ed ' 0n Christmas day 

S t !?..^th% J en G d,?„TD7c W 31 H - JOh " S °"'« 5 S CS ^ 
se^e^EW vTw^S ° n Ch ™ tm ^ day for preaching 

Bowma„,1lo U ,T5 H Bo N x^, P F e C^ ^D^c ir 0n '- Ellf 

miles to fill some appointments where we have an » mil,' 
cant for baptism. Collection taken, $15. After dinner Sne" 
of us picked cotton and gave the proceed <l !» 
SSS. 'oS^b^T $I6 3S - P ' S ' Hanm!n 35 k f0 D."2: 



AN ELDERS' AND MINISTERS' MEETING. 

Pursuant to appointment, the elders and ministers of 
the Botetourt (Va.) church met in semiannual meeting 
Dec. 22. Fourteen ministers were present and gave a 
report of their ministerial work during the year 1906. 
Two, having recently moved into our district, had 
preached but a very few sermons. Some of our ministers 
are engaged in school work and do not have the oppor- 
tunity of some other ministers, while others are aged and 
infirm, but all seem willing to help bear the glad tidings 
of salvation to a lost world. Twelve ministers reported 
having preached five hundred and thirty-one sermons dur- 
ing the year. Perhaps one hundred of these sermons 
were preached outside of our own congregational district, 
while half that many sermons were preached by visiting 
ministers in our territory. 

Our report shows seventy-seven baptized in our dis- 
trict, while no report was made of those baptized through 
the efforts of our workers in other territory. 

The Botetourt church has enjoyed unprecedented suc- 
cess and prosperity during the year, which affords us 
great reasons to be thankful to the great and good Ruler 
Not an unkind word has been spoken or an unpleasant 
feeling expressed among our ministers toward each oth- 
er, and the spirit of rivalry has no place among us. 

I am convinced that if the elders of a church would so 
organize their work as to give all their ministers what 
work they can do, there would be more peace and har- 
mony existing in some of our churches than we now find. 
We decided to continue our special assignments dur- 
ing the coming year. Our senior elder, Jonas Graybill 
requested to be relieved of special work on account of 
his age. However, he will alternate with us in the reg- 
ular appointments. 

During the coming year we have twelve preaching 
points, each under the special care of a minister. We 
have operated this plan for two years so successfully 
that we are encouraged to continue it. The advantages 
are many, as we have proven by the ingathering of souls 
Troutville, Va., Dec. 28. C . D. Hylton. ' 



two sermons. Besides the regular work there were , 
.lumber of special conferences with the different clas*,' 
of workers and a great deal of private counsel with i„ 
dividual workers, given by the director, G. M Lauver 
of Bethany Bible School. 

Altogether nine churches were represented, seven „l 
them by ministers, the others by Sunday-school worker, 
We feel confident that the influence of this normal will 
be general. This is, I believe, the first normal held in this 
district. Those who feared there would be dangerous 
ideas presented were very pleasantly disappointed. Many 
new ideas were presented by the Word itself, but no 
dangerous ones. As a matter of fact those who received 
this teaching are stronger in the old faith than ever be 
fore, being able to give new and strong reasons for the 
hope that is within them. 

On account of the large attendance' from outside of 
Lando and the number of people in Cando who eoukl not 
attend the day sessions, the evening, which we had planned 
o give to evangelism, was given to two hours of solid 
teaching. I„ this the non-members were very much in 
tcrested, and we hope they had laid for them a Strom, 
foundation for faith. Three were baptized and we are 
working and praying for the salvation of others 

Cando, N. Dak., Dec. 26. Pau , MohIer 



BIBLE NORMAL OF CANDO, N. DAK. 

The Bible Normal, of Cando, opened Nov. 26 and closed 
Dec. 20. During that time there were five regular one- 
hour sessions each day, except Sunday, when there were 



FROM WINONA, MINNESOTA. 

We had our Christmas program on the Friday evening 
before^ We had a well-filled house and attentive listen" 
ers. The Sunday-school children did their part well 
showing a marked improvement over the past year Our 
enrollment has reached seventy-five, and we trust that be 
fore another year rolls around it will reach one hundred 
After the program was over each child was given a little 

On Saturday, Sister Eva Heagley left us for her home 
in South Dakota. We were sorry to see her go, for all 
who knew her loved her. I am glad to say that Brother 
and Sister J. E. Keller, with their two daughters of Tip- 
ton, Iowa, have located with us. We would like to see 
more of our members locate here. The school privileges 
are fine in Winona, and, besides, there is the advantage 
of church services. 

We extend our heartiest thanks to the brethren and 
sisters of the Grundy County church, Iowa, for the of- 
fering and clothing sent us; also to the sisters of the 
So„h Waterloo church for their donation of money and 
clo thing. We also received a letter, enclosing one dollar 
and fifty cents, from a little girl only six years old. May 
God abundantly bless the little children and the older 
ones as well. T ,-,„■ „.. 

808 W. 7,1, St, Dec. 27. '" H ' Iary ' 



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"SET FOR THE DEFENSE OF THE GOSPEL."— Phil. 1- fr.S r '/'% 

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Elgin, III., January 12, 1907. 



No. 2. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. to compare the way these shepherds live with the way 

Editorial,— tne flocl;s "ve. And '* the question were left to a vote 

Tile Accessions for 1906, 24 ■' is probable that the prelates would be deprived of 

Thl* Shlphlltfs Responsibility,' Y.r.V. II "'"'' le S islative functions and their palaces and would 

The Two Ifs 25 llave their salaries cut down. In the established church 

cSL^in g pginnirs; \\V±\-l\":::"[::±£ , th , ere are two a "*bishops a "d thirty-three bishops. 

Our India Mission, 26 Their incomes amount to $S81,500, or an average of 

Essays- Ch " TCh " "' D °''" g ; ' ' 26 a little more than $25,000. The archbishop of Canter- 
Worship of God.— John 4: 19-24. By John E hury gets $75,000 a year ; the archbishop of York and 

Mohler, ........... . IS the bishop of London $50,000 each. For the rest the 

Tracts and the Tract Work. By D. Hays IS „i ■ c „.,- nnA , »„.„ , 

About Brooklyn, N. Y.- By C. H. Brubaker, .. 18 salal ies ra "8' e from $3:>.000 to $8,000, but only two 

Christian Service By Jesse D. Mohler, . . .' 19 get less than $15,000 a year. -These salaries seem 

Irrebgion and Illiteracy Among our American In- i • ,, ,„,, , ., , . . ... , 

dians. By Frances May Fisher, 19 ni f> n i but some ol the bishops hve in palaces and are 

Giving. By Noah Longanecker, 19 compelled to live in such style that they cannot make 

Form and Godliness. By D. D. Culler, 20 , , TT . , ., ,. . . . 

The Old and the New. By J. E. Ockerman 20 eiuls meet - Under these conditions it is not strange 

The Round Table,— that a few would live more simply if they could. The 

Is the First Day of the Week Ever Called Sabbath bishop of London with his $50,000 a year grows poorer 

in the New Testament? By Chas. M. Vearout, 22 , ~, & ' 

"He Restorer!] My Soul."— Psalm 23: 3. By J S. every day. 1 Here is certainly room for improvement 

Mohler,.. 22 where such conditions prevail. 

I liming Back. By J. C. Mahorney, M. D. 22 ' 

A Friendly Warning. By Catharine Furry Burger. 22 u, t-u„ n ■. i c. . V * • .-i - , 

The Divorce Question. By J. s. Flory, ......... ..22 In the United States district court in Chicago last 

Christmas at Home. By Wm. C. Koontz 22 week, Judge Landis gave a decision against the 

H ™?e frigid. By Marguerite Bixler . . 23 I 51 ™ J" 1 " C ° mpa " y Which "* * fa ™d™g - 

Home By C. H. Steerman, 23 lts effects. He held that congress in strengthening 

Sisters' Aid Societies 23 the law against discriminating in freight rates by 

fen Mo\fMeX7s a Needer. D .T. rt ™ ent '~ 27 adc,hl? the penalty of ™P™°nment had no thought 

From Vada, India. BySteven Berkebile,' '.'.'.'..'..'. .27 0I pardoning all unindicted offenders. There were 

T ' le w"H 0r EngTar Cf Early REligious Cullllre - ^ ten indictments voted against the oil company. Two 

Retrospective— Prospective. By J. S. Kline, ...... !27 °f 'hem were quashed. The company will have to 

-- answer on indictments with an aggregate of 6,325 

ARO UN D THE WORLD counts. Conviction may mean the imposition of fines 

■***^*'**>G!s*a>2**&**>****B*=i**^: ~ »=w5ws amounting to more than a hundred million dollars. 

Avignon, in southeastern France, was the residence This decision makes the law mean something. To add 

of the popes from 1309 to 1376, and was papal to the troubles of the Standard Oil Company, prosecu- 

property until late in the eighteenth century. For a tion is talked of by Louisiana. Large corporations 

long time the papal palace has been used as a barracks, have for too long a time violated the law with im- 

but now the soldiers have been withdrawn and prepa- punity. They have done much to destroy the moral 

rations are being made to restore it. .The palace was sense of the people. It is time they were given to 

built during the fourteenth century, and some of its understand that dishonesty is as bad in high places 

walls are a hundred feet high, while the battlemented as in low, and it must be punished everywhere, 
towers are a hundred and fifty feet high. Notable 

frescoes are to be seen in the pope's chapel and the FoI< twentv y ears the dlarit >' S' ifts in England have 

chapel of the inquisition, and it is said that heretics avera g ed abo "t fifteen million dollars a year; but 1906 

were roasted on the fire in the palace kitchen. The has seen that amount doubled. Half of the thirty 

tomb of Pope Benedict XII is at Avignon. The town mi,lions was derived from the estates of four persons. 

was known as Avenio in Roman times. France and Twenty-one -others contributed $8,300,000, leaving 

the Vatican are engaged in a bitter conflict because about seven million dol,ars for a11 others ' The estate 

of the religious associations act, and it is a pleasing of A1 ^ red Beit ' the friend and P artner of Cecil 

thing to see the government at the same time restoring Rhodes, yielded the largest amount. George Herring 

this palace for its original possessors. ' came second with his lar & e contributions to hospitals. 

— ■ The widow of Sam Lewis, the society moneylender, 

A young peasant was killed by his team which ranked third. Lord Inverclyde, with his gifts to sea- 
became frightened at the automobile of the king of men, is the fourth one of the group who gave fifteen 
Saxony. The young man was the sole support of his million dollars. Large sums were given to many other 
widowed mother and six younger children. If the worthy causes. The number of wealthy persons who 
king's car had been stopped instead of being run at seek to benefit the public during life or after death 
increased speed when the horses were frightened, all seems to be increasing, 
might have been well. But that was not done, the ,_ ' ; "T . , , , 

.,„„,.« m v .i i i t i i • *i it.- Prof. Rouert Koch resigned the presidency of the 

young man is dead, and the king through his court „ _ . , -,, . , 

marshal made the mother an offer of three hundred Berlm Med,Cal Socjety last May ,n order to continue 

•dollars-half payable this year and half next-as hls investigation! of the so-called ' sleeping sickness 

« rtm «««»-,*:„ TU c j j u m equatorial Africa. In ins report he says that the 

compensation. The money was refused and she H . , ; J , ... 

*t,™-.+a««. <--. i ■ -4. an. i ■ i i makulv attacks particularly men in the prime of life, 

thieatens to bring suit. The king- places a very low ■> r - . , 

valuation on peasant life. But that is not to be won- and the mortal "- v from the s,ckn f ss h * S ^" i0 great 

dered at. He has yet to learn that though of royal that whole villa ?" are "7 mnab ' ted , onl c v by W ,°"7 

i,i- nf , i„ • mnA f . .. , ., r . ■ and chddren. The population of the Sese islands, 

moon ne is made of no better clay than some of his ^ T , - , - ,,-,,-1 

OM KJ--f e «rk« 1 * ■ +1 -l 1 northwest of Victoria Nyanza, which in 1902 was 

subjects who are lowest in the social scale. - , , __ , , 

■ thirty thousand, is now twelve thousand. He found 

The lords spiritual in the English house of lords that a preparation of arsenic is as efficacious in the 

have been siding with the lords temporal on the treatment of the sickness as quinine is in the case of 

educational bill and other measures which received the malaria. At Sese islands nine hundred patients are 

support of an overwhelming majority in the house being treated for the disease. The insects spreading 

of commons. Under the leadership of the archbishop the sickness live in the undergrowth or on water plants 

of Canterbury they take sides with the peers and growing near the margins of lakes, and feed on dead 

against the people. This attitude is causing the people water fowl, fish and crocodiles. 



Lobbyists will not have as much influence in the 
future as they have had in the past. They are recog- 
nized as an evil, as a corrupting force, and efforts are 
being made to get rid of them. Governor Folk of 
Missouri took a stand against them last year. Lately 
the Nebraska legislature adopted a resolution demand- 
ing that lobbyists be ejected forcibly from the floor 
of the house if necessary. And action is contemplated 
by the Illinois legislature. There has been much 
lobbying in the past, and some bad laws have been 
passed because of it. Legislators are supposed to be 
intelligent; and if they do not have the information 
they need they can get it from reliable persons, and 
should not be influenced by those who have a wholly 
selfish interest in the bill under consideration. Laws 
are to secure the greatest good to the greatest number. 

General von der Launitz, prefect of police at St. 
Petersburg, was assassinated Thursday of last week. 
When he was governor of Tambov he whipped the 
peasants, and this was always remembered against 
him. After the dissolution of the douma last summer, . 
St. Petersburg was declared in a state of siege, and 
he was autocrat. Me made it exceedingly unpleasant 
for all opposition parties, and this intensified the 
feeling against him. The fact that the prefect of 
police could not protect himself shows the condition 
of affairs in Russia. The return to power of the 
reactionaries has been followed by vigorous repressive 
measures by the government, which has aroused the 
terrorists to renewed activity. Unspeakable crimes 
are common, and the end of this deplorable condition 
is not in sight. 

The party column and party circle on official ballots 
will likely disappear. There is a demand that they 
be done away with, for they do much to retain the 
party boss. When once the names of the candidates 
for an office are all placed under that office and the 
party column is no more, voting the straight ticket 
by marking a cross in the circle at the head of it will 
be out of the question. And on the straight ticket the 
power of the boss very largely depends. His influence 
should cease. Men have been too long tied to parties 
in affairs where the party was of absolutely no im- 
portance. They need more independence, and the 
party leaders should be given to understand that no 
candidate will be supported if his only qualification 
is that he belongs to the party. The people can have 
good men put up for office if they refuse to vote for 
bad ones. The party cuts a small figure in comparison 
with character and ability. 



At its last session the English parliament passed a 
law against " bookmaking." Men had their regular 
beats where they went to receive bets on races. The 
new act puts them out of business. The first offense 
of frequenting the street — and " street " is made to 
include highways, public bridges, roads, lanes, foot- 
ways, squares, courts, alleys, or passages, whether 
thoroughfares or not — to secure bets is met by a fine 
of fifty dollars; the second, one hundred dollars, and 
the third or subsequent offense entails risk of a two 
hundred and fifty dollar fine or imprisonment up to 
six months. The law takes a specially grave view of 
betting transactions with boys under sixteen years of 
age. It imposes the severest penalty for this offense. 
Race courses are specially exempted from the restric- 
tions, but " public places," as defined in the act, include 
public parks, gardens, sea beaches, or any s uninclosed 
ground to which the public has unrestricted access. 
This law will be a blessing to many laboring people, 
for much of their earnings went to the bookmaker. 
The law would have been still better if it had not 
allowed gambling anywhere. 



18 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 12, 1907. 



ESSAYS 



Studj to show thyself approved unto God, a workman that needetli not 
be ashamed, rightly dividing the Word of Truth." 

DO YOUR WORK, WATCH AND PRAY. 
BY MARTIN H. MILLER. 

Are you watching, are yon sleeping? 

Are you working now to-day? 
Are you constant vigils keeping? 

Do you work and watch and pray? 

Are you eager for his coining? 

Are you singing 'long the way? 
Are you love's sweet errands running? 

Do you work and watch and pray? 
'Tis no time for you to slumDer, 
There is work to do each day; 
Haste to join that happy number 
Who do work and watch and pray. 

There is work for each believer. 

As you pass along life's way. 
Yield not to the great deceiver; 

Up to work and watch and pray. 
Watch for souls who may be straying 
From love's bright and shining way; 
Thus the Master be obeying 

As you work and watch and pray. 
Pray for workers in his vineyard, 
Pray for light upon your way, 
And you'll shout as you go homeward, 

" I did work and watch and pray." 
Are you working, are you watching? 
Are you sleeping through the day? 
Are you ready for his coming? 

Do you work and watch and pray? 
Laton, Cal. 



WORSHIP OF GOD.— John 4: 19-24. 
BV JOHN E. MOHLER. 

The word " worship " is commonly used so indis- 
criminately and so carelessly that it is worth while 
making it the subject of. an essay. 

We speak of " Jewish worship," referring to temple 
service and sacrifices; or "idol worship," referring 
to idolatrous rites and services; or "Christian wor° 
ship," having in mind the rituals of Christian churches 
or devotions in the name of Christ. 

Now, none of these are necessarily worship, and 
some of them are not at all. 

Worship is an Anglo-Saxon term, and was originally 
weardhscipe. It means a state of worth or worthiness, 
from worth and the termination ship. To worship 
God, therefore, means to acknowledge his worth or 
worthiness. 

And there is no such thing as worshiping him 
without doing that, in our very spirit. Worship may 
be, therefore, in connection with church rites and 
services or in their absence. 

Acknowledging God's worth above the worth of 
all things or creatures, is worship. This is illustrated 
by the legend of Abraham, which says that he first 
worshiped the stars. But he saw that they set and 
ceased to worship them. The same difficulty met him 
with the moon and the sun, as by turns he worshiped 
them. Then he conceived that there must be a being 
greater than the heavens, who guides them, and whose 
glory never sets in darkness. And the Bible tells us 
that when the God of glory appeared unto Abraham in 
Mesopotamia, Abraham worshiped him 

Bowing the knee in the attitude of prayer may not 
be worship for worship is only when the soul is upon 
its knees before God. Prayer itself is not worship 
although ,t may be prefaced by, or concluded with 
worship. " Worship is the overflowing of a full heart' 
while prayer is the craving of an empty heart " 

Reading the Bible and meditating upon it is not 
worship, though it may lead to worship. Observing 
the sacraments of the church is not worship, although 
worship should precede and accompany their ob- 
servance. 

The worship of God is the soul bowing down before 
him ,n reverence and acknowledgment of his worth 
above all things. Ordinances and church services are 

f eWs f ^ Par ' ial """*"* of worshipful 

teehngs They are not worship, themselves. Worshin 
is m spirit and unseen. vvorsmp 



We commonly speak of public worship and private 
or secret worship. All worship, however, is secret, 
and it is only the expression of our worship that is 
public. And no one can understanding^ worship God 
without being moved to publicly expressing that wor- 
ship as much as possible. 

We speak of obeying God because we love him. 
But we iove him because we have worshiped him— 
that is, recognized his worth above all things. We 
cannot really love him unless we have worshiped him. 
In worship, the soul talks without words, and God 
understands. 

"Words without thoughts never to heaven go." 
" The hour cometh, and now is, when the true wor- 
shipers shall worship the Father in spirit and in truth : 
for the Father seeketh such to worship him."" 

God values ourservice to him not a whit unless it 
proceeds from a spirit of worship. And no act, how- 
ever insignificant, loses its reward when prompted by 
a feeling of worship. 

Strong feeling always accompanies devout worship 
for die worshiper feels God's worth more than he' 
comprehends it. Emotions are right, and never too 
great when it conies to acknowledging God's worthi- 
ness. Religious feelings lead into error only when 
we make them the guide of our life regardless of 
revealed truth. 

Disappointments and calamities cause persons to 
worship God who would never have done so without 
them. For instance, that man who was bereaved of 
wife and children came to know God's worth only 
when he was deprived of their association. And 
many a soul was made to feel God's worthiness in the 
San Francisco disaster when they saw there was no 
other being to depend upon. Then they worshiped 
him. 

In the calm of undisturbed living, nothing else will 
lead us to worship God equal to a quiet contemplation 
of the Supreme Being and his works. 

Manistique, Mich. 



that tracts be published, they must be distributed 
Who is to blame that tracts are not more generally 
distributed? Is it for the lack of workers, or is -l 
because our tracts are not in presentable form' It 
can not be that the subject matter of our tracts is 
of no intrinsic merit. The doctrine of the church has 
certainly been treated in a number of them ably and 
analytically, and it is a surprise that even in some 
of the schools under the tutorship of brethren the 
subject matter of the tracts touching secrecy, noncon- 
formity, the prayer covering, etc., as treated in these 
tracts, has escaped their attention. But why talk 
about tracts in the field, when those who have been 
nurtured in the homes and in the schools are un- 
acquainted with and unconscious, we may charitably 
suppose, stand opposed to the best interests of the 
tract work itself? Do we not see in this condition of 
things the importance of each home "and school as 
well as every Sunday-school library, keeping on file 
a copy of each book and tract specially intended for 
the mission field, as matter for reference? 

Whose duty is it, then, to place the tracts and books 
for reference in the homes, schools, and the Sundav- 
school libraries? Whose duty is it to distribute them 
agreeably to the purpose of the Tract Work in its 
organization ? What is needed to make the tract work 
more effective? Does any one say that the subject 
matter of our tracts should be put in the form to be 
prized as a precious keepsake? or shall the treatment 
of the theme be so intensely tinctured with pure doc- 
trine that it will be snatched up by the thirsty soul 
as one long waiting for a drink of pure, refreshing 
water ? 5 

Broadway, Va. 



ABOUT BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



»Y C. H. BRUBAKER. 



TRACTS AND THE TRACT WORK. 



BY D. HAYS. 



On page 178, " Revised Minutes," Art 1 18Q3 
we have a report of Committee on Consolidation of the 
General Church and Missionary Work and the Book 
and Tract Work. It is needless to say that before 
the consolidation the Book and Tract Work was a 
separate organization. According to Section 1 the 
Committee now known as the General Missionary and 
1 ract Committee, hold in trust to manage, control and 
use all the property, rights and interests formerly 
vested in both the above-named organizations "for 
the promotion of the objects for which they were 
designed." 

The object of the " Book and Tract Work," as stated 
in its organization, Art. 7, 1885, " shall be the dissemi- 
nation of the principles of the Gospel of Christ through 
the distribution of tracts and other publications both 
in this and foreign countries; in families, in cities 
towns and country_in short, everywhere, as means' 
for publication and facilities for judicious dissem.'na- 
lion can be secured." 

It may not be generally known that a large pro- 
portion of soliciting was done and donations made 
for the purpose of publishing and disseminating tracts 
and the present organization has no right to divert 
any part of the funds thus donated to any other use 
the Tract Examining Committee has been holding 
a session once a year at the time and place of Annual 
Meeting. This year (1907), if the Lord wills the 
committee will meet at Los Angeles, California, anil 
■t will be the pleasure of the committee to serve the 
best interests of the Brethren on the Pacific coast and 
through them the Brotherhood everywhere 

We have tracts in leaflet, pamphlet, and a number 
of these combined and published in book form, but 
with all this there is not the interest given to the use 
of tracts there should be. The purpose of the donors 
of he tract fund was " the dissemination of the Prin- 
ciples of the Gospel of Christ through the distribution 
of tracts and other publications." It is not enough 



A few days prior to sailing for India, I spent at 
the Brooklyn Mission. I was very agreeably in- 
pressed with the amount and kind of work that is 
being done there under the efficient leadership of Eld 
J. Kurtz Miller. It does not take one long to see how 
much handicapped our dear brother is on account of 
the lack of larger quarters, and I am sure that if 
more of the brethren were conscious of the needs at 
that place, the money would be soon forthcoming for 
the new church at Brooklyn. 

It is really amazing, when we stop to think of it, 
how we often cripple the usefulness of a mission by 
allowing it to be cramped by our carelessness or lack 
of concern for its development. I am not complaining 
of cramped conditions simply in caring for outgoing 
missionaries. In fact, I am not complaining at all, 
but rather urging the necessity of promptness to do 
what many of us know we ought to do, in regard to 
extending God's kingdom in Brooklyn and vicinity. 
It is marvelous to see how, by loving sympathy and 
the Christian spirit, missionaries can be cared for in 
the home of Bro. Miller, and how so many Sundav- 
school scholars and classes can be crowded into "a 
small room. Yet it is nevertheless true that loving 
sympathy and the Christian spirit ought to operate 
in the hearts and minds of our entire Brotherhood in 
order to build the much-needed church and mission 
home at Brooklyn. 

Some things are nice! Some things are needed! 
But some things are necessities! The Brooklyn 
church and mission home is a necessity. Here is a 
great center, composing one-twentieth of the popula- 
tion of the United States, a city receiving foreigners 
by the thousand, every year ; a point from which all 
our missionaries have set sail in the past, and by the 
grace of God and the impelling force of Matt. 28 : 19 
and the constraining power of John 3:16, a Doint 
from which many more heralds of the Cross are yet 
to set sail in the future! These, I say, are reasons 
why Brooklyn should be well equipped, for indeed her 
needs are great and greater still are her opportunities. 
For the sake of Christ and the church, I hope and 
pray that the Brethren's ideal for Brooklyn may soon 
become the real. Brooklyn, indeed, is a strategic point 
in the extension of God's kingdom. 
Gibraltar. 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 12, 1907. 



19 



CHRISTIAN SERVICE. 



BY JESSE D. MOHLEE. 

When Jesus gave the invitation, " Come unto me, 
all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give 
you rest," Matt. 11:28, he was not calling unto the 
listless repose that is endured by some of those who 
profess to have accepted the call. The invitation is 
to partake of Christ's labors as well as the reward, 
for every one must " serve some one more or less 
actively. 

The body can rest and remain perfectly quiet except 
in the action and process of certain organs ; but with 
the mind and soul there is no such thing as inaction. 
Our experiences are only restful in comparison with 
other experiences, and in the healthful enjoyments of 
those things which are good. Christ invited those 
whose, conditions and experiences were a laboring 
under the burden of sin, and who found its yoke 
galling, to come under a new experience that would 
give an ever restful condition of mind and soul, but 
gave not a hint of inaction. To a healthy body filled 
with energy, inaction is unpleasing. Nor does a 
healthy spirit seek inactivity as a desirable condition. 
That is a condition of the dying and the dead. 

We were invited to take up, in place of our dead 
load of sin, so bitterly galling, the light load that 
Christ places on his disciples. With that advantage 
Christ offered us an easy yoke. Now a yoke is not 
an instrument of torture, but a means of helping us 
do something. Satan's yoke was hard and torturous, 
but Jesus offers us an easy yoke. Satan placed all the 
burden on us ; but Christ carried first his own burden 
of the yoke, and gave us an immeasurable advantage 
in the lighter end. With all that, he requires some- 
thing of us continually, but makes it a labor of love, 
and promises that we, as servants unto him, shall be 
made as kings as an inheritance. 

One who is wise in this world diligently pursues 
whatever is his calling. He studies his occupation, 
applies the experiences of others to his own needs, 
and scans the horizon for new opportunities for ad- 
vancement. This is necessary to keep at white heat 
his interest in his calling; and it is just as necessary 
that we keep an outlook for advancing ourselves in 
God's service, and ever freshen our interest in the 
success of his cause. 

The writer often thinks of a certain stream of 
water that starts from springs in the mountains, pure 
and clear as crystal. Ere long it passes through a 
town and takes up its sewage. Were its course 
checked there it would stagnate and so fill with poison 
that the whole supply could not clarify its waters. 
But it rushes on unmindful of its load of filth, leaping, 
splashing and gurgling, until in a short time it shows 
as clear and pure as ever, a life-giving stream. So 
the spirit of man is cleansed of its dross by activity 
in the course prepared for our service. 

Again, we have observed that in nature is a process 
of life by death. The grasses and herbs die that some- 
thing higher may live; that in turn gives way to a 
form higher yet, until the limit is reached in man, 
the supreme handiwork of God. There the natural 
law finds its complement in a spiritual law given by 
Jesus, " For whosoever will save his life shall lose 
it; and whosoever will lose his life for my sake shall 
find it." Matt. 16:25. 

God intended that our bodies should be a dwelling 
place for a life even more precious than its natural 
life. In first seeking the things of the natural life 
and its desires one fails to secure the higher, the 
spiritual. But he who, being baptized into Christ has 
put on Christ, yields himself a servant to Christ. 
Henceforth he seeks the things of the better life, to 
the supplanting of the desired things of the natural. 
In doing that, we must, like Paul, " die daily," 1 Cor. 
• 15:31, in order that we may daily be made alive to 
God and his service. 

Then, having become " a new creature, old. things 
are passed away; behold, all things are become new." 
2 Cor. 5: 17. We see things anew, and with the in- 
terest that always surounds the new we become am- 
bassadors for Christ. All this means service, it means 



sacrifice, it means praying and striving, a continual 
seeking to do the will of our heavenly Father. 

It means, too, a walking through the valley of 
humility, a standing against trials and a baffling with 
storms. He who tacks and shifts with every adverse 
wind will never reach his haven laden with treasure. 
It takes faithful determination and strong clinging to 
God's hand to prove ourselves fully in God's service. 
Let me say here that the trials through which God 
leads us may be taken as evidence that he has accounted 
us worthy to bear a part in his work on earth. 

With the entrusting to his servants of such toil- 
some tasks he supplies the needed strength. The 
failures and destructions among God's servants are 
through failure or neglect to depend fully enough on 
his h«*p. No one can know the fullness and sweetness 
of God's grace until he has been tried in the crucible, 
and has drunk from that living fountain of help, and 
come forth renewed in strength, filled with praise to 
God and of his mercy to those who trust him. 

Let us not count ourselves to have attained anything, 
nor to have apprehended that for which we are ap- 
prehended ; but with loving, loyal service to God, lay 
hold of such things as are given us for our work, 
for there awaiteth us rewards in this life and a final 
reward to all those that love his appearing. 

Warrensburg, Mo. 



IRRELIGION AND ILLITERACY AMONG OUR 
AMERICAN INDIANS. 



BY FRANCES MAY FISHER. 

On any subject there is no better argument than 
examples or cases that may be cited as evidence. 

I was impressed by the editorial entitled " Educa- 
tion and Religion," which appeared in one of the 
recent Messengers, and it seems to me that there is 
no better evidence on the subject than the problem 
of Indian education. 

Notice, for instance, the government school located 
here at Stewart, Nevada, about three miles from 
Carson City. The government spends thousands of 
dollars every year to educate the Indians of Nevada 
and California at this school. 

No provision is made for spiritual education other 
than the Sunday-school and chapel exercises which the 
pupils must attend and which the employes conduct. 
Two Sunday evenings in the month a missionary, 
supported by the Methodist Episcopal church, talks to 
the children. 

Absolutely no religious qualifications are necessary 
to enter the Indian service. In fact, the vouchers or 
recommendations required by the government from 
friends or former employers of the applicants, state 
explicitly that religious qualifications must not be con- 
sidered for or against the applicant. Hence we find 
those in the schools who mock at the religion of Jesus 
and openly ridicule his followers. 

We teach the children that they should be honest, 
sober, true men and women, and that they must be 
industrious and temperate if they would succeed in 
life. They have but to turn to another employe to 
find an individual who violates one or more of the 
same principles. 

In Sunday school we try to show them the beauty of 
holiness, and "that a* successful life is not reckoned 
alone on the accumulation of dollars and cents, nor 
in lands and chattels, but that it must contain those 
attributes which made Jesus the Savior of the world 
and our pattern. 

Perhaps in a few hours some person, whom the 
world calls successful, and whom the children are 
taught to look upon as such, will use the same lesson 
as a topic upon which to expend his contempt. In 
many Christian localities the ignorance of the children 
on Bible subjects is indeeed deplorable, but unless one 
is acquainted with the Indian children it is hard to 
realize their absolute ignorance of the Sacred Book. 
Since the Sunday-school or chapel lesson is so entirely 
new and unknown to them, and the ways of the world 
comparatively old. and since they consider the person 
who makes a living, successful ; they see no necessity 
for being Christians. 

The Indian of the West is not the owner of land 



nor the recipient of a quarterly allowance as are some 
of the eastern Indians. He must earn his living. If 
he can acquire enough manual training and academic 
work to secure a lucrative position he is accounted 
successful, though he may spend a large percentage 
of his wages at the saloon counters or gambling tables. 
His standaid of morality, like that of many of his 
white neighbors, is low. He is entirely without 
Christian training. His forefathers gave to him none 
of those sterling qualities to which the present white 
generation must attribute much of its success. If the 
white man, whose ancestors for generations have been 
educated Christian men and women, fails, what can 
be expected of the Indian whose inheritance is ignor- 
ance and superstition? 

The better an Indian is educated along a certain line, 
the better wages he commands. The better his wages, 
the more he spends unprofitably. For this reason 
many condemn Indian education as a failure. Why 
is it a failure? Because he has no knowledge of that 
Infinite Power, that Refuge, which alone could shield 
him from temptation and crime. His education is 
not complete. The vital part of it is neglected. The 
spiritual life is left to starve, and a wreck is the result. 

Indian School, Stewart, Nevada. 



BY N0A1L LONGANECKER. 

We shall briefly notice this topic under two heads. 
(1) Giving under the Old Testament. (2) Giving 
under the New Testament. 

1. A considerable part of giving under the Old 
Testament was by tithing. This was law. But even 
then " free-will offerings " were always acceptable. 
Paying tithes was in use in the time of Abraham and 
Jacob. It was quite ancient. Of its origin we can 
not positively tell. Negatively, something might he 
attempted. Tithing was positively enjoined by the law. 
" All the tithe of the land, or of the fruit of the tree, 
is the Lord's: it is holy unto the Lord." Lev. 27:30. 
Profane history teaches us that anciently, victors 
offered tithes of spoils, as also of their increase, 
to the gods they worshiped. Abraham .worshiped the 
Lord, the only true God. Paul says that he paid tithes 
to the " King of righteousness." " And this is his 
name whereby he shall he called : The Lord our 
righteousness." Jer. 23:6. Abraham was noted for 
his strong faith in God. " Faith comes by hearing, and 
hearing by the word of God." Rom. 10:17. This 
implies that Abraham was taught, in some way, of his 
duty to pay tithes to his " King." As Abraham offered 
tithes of his spoils, so Jacob offered tithes of his 
increase. Christ and Paul recognized this as a duty 
that the children of Israel owed to God under the 
"law and prophets." Christ says, "The law and the 
prophets were until John." Under the Old Testament 
the civil and the ecclesiastical governments were 
united, and were enforced by the same officers. 

2. Giving under the New Testament. Be it known 
that the state and church are both necessary now, but 
are not now united, nor are their laws enforced by 
the same officer. The civil government draws its 
principles of law from the Old Testament. The state 
must have, and asks for, a support from her subject;;. 
Call this rate of support tithing, or taxation; the 
principle is the same. But it is real tithing if the 
rate is the tenth. Civil government is of God, and 
Christ as well as Paul teaches us that when we evade, 
refuse, or oppose this taxation, we become highly 
guilty before God. This giving is a matter of law. 

But how about giving in the church of Christ? 
Does the New Testament allow us to enforce tithing 
on the members of the Brethren church? This ques- 
tion means something to us now. The following 
query is referred to Annual Meeting of 1907, for an 
answer: " We. the McPherson church, petition Annual 
Meeting of 1906, through the district meeting of 
Southwestern Kansas and Southern Colorado, to urge 
that each member in the church tithe, and thus enable 
the church to Garry on the work of saving the lost 
more effectively. See Lev. 27 : 30 ; Heb. 7 : 4-6 ; 1 Cor. 
16:2." The first two passages have been applied in 



20 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 12, 1907. 



The third will be con- 



spirit. The Transcendentalist, of whom Ralph Waldo 
Emerson is the best example, refused to recognize even 
this much of unanimity of faith, and declared every 
man a law unto himself, insisting that the form of 
godliness which is sufficient for one man can by no 
means satisfy another, that essentially every man must 
d presents the Gospel be wholly different from every other man in his form 
of faith and practice, since every man must follow Ins 

" The Tran- 



the first part of this essay 
sidered anon. 

As far as we know, our best Bible scholars arc 
all agreed on the following: "The Savior and the 
apostles nowhere taught tithing as a rule for giving 
to the Christian church." We are very m 
that the General Mission 
rule for giving. . . 

We were very much pleased at our late ministerial 
meeting. The following topic was warmly discussed : 
"Does the New Testament teach tithing? If not, 
what does it teach? " It was unanimously agreed that 
the New Testament does not teach tithing as a model 
for giving. As to the manner of giving we will make 
but two quotations: (1) "Not grudgingly, or ot 
necessity, for the Lord loveth a cheerful giver. (2) 
" He that giveth, let him do it with simplicity. 

But how much to give is what the minute of Annual 
Meeting wishes us to consider. 

1 "He which soweth sparingly shall reap also 
sparingly; and he which soweth bountifully shall reap 
also bountifully. Every man according as he pur- 
pose* in his heart, so let him give." 2 Cor. 9:6. 7. 
This passage will not allow me to legislate how much 
my brother must give. But more of this anon. 

2. " For if there be first a willing mind, it is 
accepted according to thai a man hath, and not accord- 
ing to that he hath not." 2 Cor. 8:12. The chapter 
as a whole exhorts to liberal giving. Paul aimed 
to have all thus to give, that there might be an 
equality. _ tt 

3. "Every man according to his ability.' Acts 

11:29. 

4. " As the Lord hath prospered him." He who 
wills in his mind, and purposeth in his heart to give 
liberally, cheerfully and bountifully, will realize that 
God loves him. He will realize that " the liberal soul 
shall be made fat." The teachings of Christ and the 
apostles will not allow me to dictate if any one wills 
in his mind, or purposeth in his heart, to give the 
tenth, the one-half, or even all his living. Neither 
will said teachings allow me to dictate that any one 
should thus give. " As the Lord hath prospered 
him " is the rule of " the law of liberty." To illustrate : 
A and B each has a farm valued at $2,000. During 
this year each farm gives an increase of $500. Under 
the Mosaic law when in force, as well as under the 
civil law of to-day, each would have to give the same 
amount at the close of the year. Tithing makes this 
a positive fact. But how about the Gospel rule? A 
had no expense, nor losses through sickness and ac- 
cidents during the year. But B's expenses and losses 
aggregated $1,000. How much shall each give? You 
and I know not. We can not tell. A and B alone 
must decide each for himself by the perfect law of 
liberty. Each must remember for himself that, " If 
there be first a willing mind, it is accepted according 
to that a man hath, and not according to that he hath 
not." Then let each give cheerfully, liberally, and 
freely, "As the Lord has prospered him." To " urge " 
means to press; to push; to draw; to impel; etc. 
— Webster? If Christ and the apostles nowhere taught 
tithing, why should the church " urge " her members 
to do so now? Every time we add to the written 
Word, we weaken our church government. Who 
has not learned this fact? We dare not legislate 

where the Word is silent. Paul says, " I speak as to 

wise men; judge ye what I say." 

Harmlle, Ohio. 



own " inner light," his own "over soul 
scendentalist fundamentally abrogates all law, destroys 
all ideals, denies all abiding form. The Quaker 
established the informal as his law or creed. His 
reform merely substituted the chaos of the informal 
for the order of the formal. His law of the spirit 
became his dogma just as rigid, as stern and as tyran- 
nical as ever the dogma of the Puritan or the Episco- 
palian had been. All he had really done was to Crowd 
out a form, a creed, a dogma that he did not like, and 
put in its place a form, a creed, a dogma that he did 
like— that is all, nothing more— as far as form of 
godliness is concerned. 

Now, godliness must have form or it has no 
existence here, for our powers to know are limited to 
things possessing form. Truth must be embodied to 
be effective. To think of possessing religion in the 
abstract is nonsense. To say you are a Christian and 
yet have none of the Christ-given forms is to speak in 
riddles. You can thus reduce Christianity to an ab- 
stract principle, to an unknown power, to an incom- 
prehensible ideal; but as such it ceases to be Chris- 
tianity since it ceases to be tangible. Christianity is 
nothing if not attainable, if not actual, living, tangible. 
It must reach real men through possible means. To 



at things in the same way we can not have sight in 
common. Unless we believe in the same laws we 
can not live in the same state; unless we think 
uniformly upon Christ's teaching we can not Belong 
to the same organization ; for I do not know how any 
organization could exist unless its fundamental prin- 
ciple be uniformity of faith. But this very uniformity 
of faith, this unanimity of thought gives creed, tenets, 
law, dogma. The creed may be faulty, it may be 
narrow, it may be self-contradictory, still if it is the 
best I can do I must go on with it, for it is my con- 
scious acceptance' of the Christ-life with all of its 
meaning for me and my fellows. As light comes, the 
creed ought to express it or else the light will be 
lost. It is, doubtless, the blind adherence to their 
creed by narrow, shortsighted, dogmatic leaders that 
has called down this long bitter censure of creed and 
dogma in the abstract. The power is not in the creed 
but in union in the" light. The power lies in having 
a form of godliness and at the same time proving the 
power of it. Godliness has power only when it has 
both spirit and form ; when its spirit is seen in its form. 
Ml. Morris. III. 



THE OLD AND THE NEW. 



BY J. E. OCKERMAN. 

How appropriate the theme as we stand at the 
closing of the old year and the threshold of the new! 
How suggestive the subject as we reflect, upon the 
changes which the passing of the years brings to us 1 
How impressive the thought that the changing of the 



possess the Christ-life in the abstract means to live it years makes all new things old; and it is well for us 

as we pass these milestones on life's journey to pause 
and reflect. 



FORM AND GODLINESS. 



BY D. D. CULLER. 

"This know also, that in the last days perilous times 
shall come. For men shall be lovers of their own selves. 
. . . without natural affection. . traitors, . . . 

lovers of pleasures more than lovers of God; having a 
form of godliness, but denying the power thereof: from 
such turn away." 2 Tim. 3: 1-5. 

The Quaker thought to get rid of form entirely and 
so spiritualized all the ordinances and all the services 
of the house of God. He dispensed with all order in 
the meeting of the society, awaiting the impulse to 
speak or to pray. He had no program, no form of 
procedure. Thus he hoped to kill form and glorify 



n a dream or to think it in a proposition 

But even dreams have form, and so have the 
philosopher's propositions. Thought, itself, is born 
only when it can be given form in words. The egg 
or the bird, which Is the essential? the nut or the shell, 
which is more important? Which makes the tree, the 
branches or the trunk? Could we have silver without 
some form or other? How silly and how useless these 
questions ! 

important for a man to have, a heart or lungs ? Poor, 
foolish man, he must have both. So, too, he must 
have both spirit and form if he would have Christianity. 
It isn't very likely that a man's charity will amount 
to much if he never exercises it upon any one. A 
man's anger may be proverbially " terrible," however, 
if he never kindles it, peace will continue unsinged. 
Faith without a working form is dead. In this work- 
a-day world things must take form or cease to be. 
Flour must become loaves or we die for want of 
bread. Charity must become biscuit and stockings, 
else charity loses its right to a name as a virtue. 
Church doctrines spiritualized, etherealized of all tan- 
gible form or unifying law, become nonentities, 
mere nonsense. There is no prayer without form, 
there is no baptism without form. 

Usually, the man who preaches the most vociferously 
against creed and dogma is the most persistent and 
insistent in preaching his own. particular creed and 
dogma. He is always telling you he does not believe 
as the other fellow does, but believes as he, himself, 
thinks, feels or reasons it out to be. He is innocent 
enough, for he has never noticed that in his denun- 
ciation of creed and dogma in the abstract he has been 
really accomplishing nothing whatever, and that in 
denying validity to another's tenets he has been 
clamoring for the establishment of his own, so that 
it ultimately results in nothing other than a substitu- 
tion of his own creed for the other's. The pups of 
to-day are the dogs of to-morrow ; so, too, the tenets 
and creeds of to-day will be the dogmas of to-morrow. 
If you have the right creed your creed will be all 
right. If you can find a dog to suit you, his bark 
will suit you. If you find the right dogma, there will 
be no objection to it. Thus the reformer picks ove- 
all creeds and finding here a bit and there a bit, like 
a swallow, brings now a stick, now a bit of mud, now 
a feather, and then a straw, and builds, at length, a 
nest to his own liking. Once in his nest he invariably 
loses all dependence, asserting absolute ownership. 

One thing is certain, you and I can not associate 
unless we have something in common. Unless we look 



Another year has passed away, and we call it the 
old, while the new year is just dawning; how many 
the lessons which the old has brought us, and how 
many the lessons which the new will have taught us. 
We are painfully reminded, in passing, that the 
world worships at the shrine of the new in all things 
As if we were to ask which is the more temporal, and abhors that which is old. How eager 

we are to grasp and follow the new things in fashion 
and fancy 1 How slow to accept anything that savors 
of the old. 

The world is running wild to-day after every new 
thing in literature, art, and science — and what a sad 
picture it makes ; not, that the newest things have no 
good in them, but that therein does not lie all the good. 
I wish, in this connection, to emphasize especially 
the new and the old of literature. The world is full 
of good literature to-day, but it is not all new, neither 
is the new always the best. 

In this age of book-making and the printing press, 
how much worthless and dangerous literature is sent 
broadcast upon the world, and forced upon the notice 
of the young, resulting in the utter disregard of that 
which is better. 

This seems to be an age of " light literature," and 
I wish to sound an unqualified note of warning to the 
young man or the young woman whose tastes run in 
the direction of the so-called new novels, so numerous 
and so easily obtained in our day. 

Much of this new literature does not only waste 
the time of the reader, but destroys the desire for the 
purer and better. 

It is not my purpose to classify the present-day 
literature- into the wholesome and unwholesome, but 
to advise that a careful selection be made of it all, and 
only that be read which is elevating in tone and 
character — that which carries with it some lessons 
of the true, the beautiful and the good. 

I will simply suggest that some of the new historical 
novels might be read with profit, but why spend our 
time on the trashy new when there lies within our 
grasp so much of the old so-called classic literature 
of much greater value? There never was a better 
time to become acquainted with the good literature 
of all ages than in this day of cheapened literature, and 
the young people are neglecting the greatest oppor- 
tunities of their lives when they refuse to cultivate 
the acquaintance of the classic authors. True, it is not 
every one who can say, like Gibbon, that he would 
not exchange his love of reading for " all the wealth 



~ 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 12, 1907. 



of all the Indies." But while the tastes which require 
physical strength decline or pass with age, that for. 
reading steadily grows. It is illimitable in the vistas 
of pleasure it opens ; it is one of the most easily 
satisfied, one of the cheapest, and one of the least 
dependent on age, seasons, and varying conditions 
of life. This being true, how important the cultivation 
of a taste for reading and the reading of the best things 
in literature. 

H'oodville, Ohio. 

CORR ESPONDENCE 

"Write what thou Seest, and send it unto the churches." 



SUNDAY-SCHOOL TEACHERS' INSTITUTE 
SOUTHERN OHIO. 



The fifth Sunday-school teachers' institute of Southern 
Ohio was held at Covington, Dec. 24 to 28, with Bro. A. 
C. Wieand, of Bethany Bible School. Chicago, as the prin- 
cipal instructor. Some of his subjects were, "Old Testa- 
ment Book Studies," " Lesson Planning and Construction," 
" The Art of Sou! Winning," " Biblical Doctrine of 
Prayer," and "How to do Personal Work." 

Not only is Bro. Wieand well versed in these subjects, 
but the manner of his teaching is such as to create an in- 
terest and an appetite upon the part of his audience for 
a better knowledge of God's Word, and a keener realiza- 
tion of the personal responsibility resting upon every 
Christian for winning souls to Christ. 

A portion of the time was very creditably occupied by 
home talent. At an early hour on the first day's session.it 
was manifest that several hundred Sunday-school workers 
had dispensed with the usual Christmas festivities and with 
Bible in hand were most intensely enjoying a spiritual 
feast. It was soon manifest, too, that the Brethren church 
was too small for the occasion. 

One very encouraging feature of the institute was that 
a greater number than heretofore was present to remain 
the entire time. The number enrolled was 457, of which 
26 were superintendents; 73 advanced teachers; 35 primary 
teachers and 242 Sunday-school pupils. Many did not reg- 
ister. 

Another encouraging feature of the institute (and which 
is not uncommon at all Sunday-school gatherings in 
Southern Ohio) was that elders and ministers were well 
represented. Then, too, there were some from other state 
districts, and many from other denominations. 

This is the third time that Brother Wieand has been with 
us. The manner in which he is throwing his whole lift 
and soul into Bible teaching and training teachers to teach 
the Bible, his thorough preparation for such work, his 
efforts to help establish a"n institution within the church 
for more effectual results along this greatly needed line 
of work (ignoring tempting offers from sources outside 
of tile Brethren church), and the need of financial aid to 
make his efforts more fruitful, brought about our invita- 
tion for individual contributions. Over $700 was raised 
at a time when Bro. Wieand was absent from the institute 
and entirely unknown to him. Of this amount thirty- 
nine persons gave ten dollars each; thirty-two gave five 
dollars each, and twenty gave two dollars each. Others 
declared their intention to contribute more liberally in the 
near future. 

The institute closed with a good feeling. It seemed all 
present felt well paid for thus spending holiday week. 
The good people of Covington are to be commended for 
their generosity and hospitality extended to their many 
guests. Levi Minnich. 

Greenville, Ohio, Jan. 2. 



FROM CHICAGO. 



I wish to take this way to thank- all of our dear brethren 
and sisters, who have so liberally donated both money and 
clothing to our mission during the month of December. 
Pen cannot express words that would tell of the way your 
gifts were appreciated. Only those who have had experi- 
ence in work among the poor can, in part, know. 

The clothing we now have on hand, we think will be 
sufficient until spring. So please do not send us any more 
until we come to you with another call. 

We shall tell you how Christmas was spent here .at the 
Hastings street -mission. On the evening of Dec. 22, our 
usual Christmas program v*as given by the Sunday school. 
Sunday morning Bro. Kuns, of the Chicago University, 
gave us an excellent Christmas sermon. Dec. 24, the mis- 
sion girls, with a few others, met at our store room and 
arranged clothing to be taken out as a Christmas gift into 
our poor homes; a nice, warm comfort or blanket, with 
a gift for each one in the family. Invitations were also 
given to our poor children to a Christmas dinner to be 
given in the dining hall of the Bethany Bible School. The 
students who remained here during vacation kindly assist- 
ed in making these little ones happy. After dinner was 
over we took the children to the reception room, where 
all enjoyed singing, and a Christmas story was given to 
impress upon their young hearts the real significance of 
Christmas day. When they were ready to go, each one 
was presented with a gift sent in by some of our dear ones 
from the country. 

Just recently two dear young sisters were received into 
the church. Others, we feel, are very near the kingdom. 



Pray for the work 'here in this great, sinful city, that all 
may stand firm in the teachings taught us by our " Model 
Teacher," Jesus. Katie Broadwater. 

534 Marshficld Ave.. Dec 31 



MY WORK SINCE AUGUST. 



SUNDAY-SCHOOL TEACHERS' NORMAL, AT 
SUGAR CREEK, OHIO. 



A number of churches were represented at this meet- 
ing, and shared the many good things given to ns by Bro. 
Royer and others. And certainly these Sunday-school 
normals we have each year are inspiring and uplifting, 
and are a great help to the churches of the district. The 
greater effort each church makes to be at these meetings, 
the greater spiritual good they will do us. 

Sunday-school superintendents and teachers, since the 
district has provided for a meeting of this kind, let us 
make a greater effort to be at each meeting and take ad- 
vantage of these glorious opportunities. I believe it is 
a duty we owe to our classes to»be thoroughly prepared 
to teach, and in order to do this we should receive in- 
struction. In my visits to- the different schools the past 
year, I found some very energetic workers, and I am sure 
you cannot, afford to miss meetings of this sort. 

As district secretary I would like to urge upon the su- 
perintendents to be as .prompt as possible in sending me 
the reports of the different schools. And now as the year 
1907 is here, let us Sunday-school workers resolve to make 
our schools better this year than they were last. The 
Sunday school may be ever so interesting, yet there is 
always room for improvement. Let us see to it, then, that 
we do all we can to make the Sunday school better and 
to bring souls into the fold of Christ. Lois Spacht. 

Williamstown, Ohio, Dec. 31. 



MANCHESTER COLLEGE. 



Special Announcement. 

The twelfth annual special Bible term of Manchester 
College will begin Jan. 28. Bro. L. T. Holsinger, who is 
to conduct the evangelistic services, will begin preaching 
Jan. 27. A large representation from the churches is ex- 
pected. It is encouraging to note the interest that is being 
aroused in Bible study. More of our people are becoming 
willing to make the sacrifice necessary to attend our 
schools. Last year one congregation sent fifteen students 
to our special Bible term. We would like to have the 
names of those coming so that we may arrange for their 
accommodation. 

The following courses will treat in a practical way many 
important phases of church work: 

I. Studies in the Book of Acts.---P. B. Fitzwater. 
TI. Studies in Ephesians.— P. B. Fitzwater. 

III. Homiletics.— P. B. Fitzwater. 

IV. Lectures on Church Doctrine. — L. T. Holsinger. 
V. Lectures on Missions. — Galen B. Royer. 

VI. Three Lectures.— J. H. Moore. 

(1) Life and Experiences of Eld. Jas. R. Gish. 

(2) Life and Times of Eld. Geo. Wolfe. 

(3) Life, History and Characteristics of Eld. D. P. 
Sayler. 

VII. Bible Geography. — Geo. L. Studebaker. 
VIII. Sacred Music. — Sadie I. Stutsman. 

Note. — In answer to inquiries, please note that second 
winter term (ten weeks) opens Jan. 21, one week before 
the opening of special Bible term. This is a fine oppor- 
tunity for those who wish to enjoy not only the special 
Bible term but remain through the second winter term. 

E. M. Crouch. 
North Manchester, Ind., Jan. 5. 



BLUE RIDGE CHURCH. ILLINOIS. 



In order to accommodate some of our young members 
and to have them with us in our January council, we 
decided to hold the meeting on New Year's day. Our 
elder, S. Heitz, was with us and much business came be- 
fore the meeting. All was disposed of in order and a 
good spirit prevailed. We decided to hold a ten days' 
Bible term in the near future, to be conducted by Bro. 
C. C. Gibson, of Chatham, III. Wc also decided to hold 
a series of meetings about Sept. 22, having a promise from 
Bro. Geo. Miller, of Laplace, to do the preaching. 

The Urbana work for three months past was reported 
and we decided to continue our efforts six months more at 
least. The election of officers for Sunday school resulted 
in the reelection of Bro. J. F. Burton as superintendent, 
Bro. Bruce Swartz reelected assistant. For the Christian 
Workers' society Bro. G. W. Robinson was reelected pres- 
ident, and J. A. Robinson reelected vice-president. The 
writer was reelected Gospel Messenger agent and church 
correspondent. The question was asked, why the corre- 
spondent did not report all officers alike to the Messen- 
ger. The answer was they were reported, but failed to 
find their way into the Messenger. Will the Messenger 
come to our defense, and oblige? T. A. Robinson. 

Mansfield, 111., Jan. 3. 

Remarks. 

When publishing reports of a Sunday-school organiza- 
tion it has been our custom, with a few variations, only, 
to give the names of the superintendent and assistant. 
After this issue the superintendent and secretary only 
will be published. The officers of the Christian Workers 
will hereafter be limited to the president and secretary. 
The demand for space for church news is so great that 
we find it necessary to have all the reports from the 
churches as brief as possible. So far as wc know, there 
is no other paper in America that publishes as much 
church news as may be found in the Messenger from week 
to week. It is by the kindness of our church correspond- 
ents and the brevity we employ that we are enabled to give 
our readers so much valuable news in space set apart for 
that purpose. Then let it be borne in mind that these 
short reports always have the right of way for an early 
appearance, while the longer reports, such as correspon- 
dence, must wait until there is room for them. We trust 
our policy in all these particulars will be satisfactory to 
our patrons. The plan enables us to give much news from 
every part of the Brotherhood, and that is what is wanted 
by the Messenger readers. — Ed. 



After spending about seven weeks in Ray county, Mis- 
souri, holding protracted meetings and attending our dis- 
trict meeting of the Northern District of Missouri, and 
about ten days at home, the writer started, Oct. 10, for 
Ohio, to hold some meetings. 

It was his pleasure to spend a few days in the great city 
of Chicago, visiting his cousin in the South End mission 
and the rapidly-growing and overflowing Bethany Bible 
School with its many warm-hearted brethren and sisters. 

While in Ohio wc held meetings at Pleasant View 
church, in the Sugar Creek congregation, and in the Lima 
church, and in the new County Line church, just dedi- 
cated Nov. 4, 1906. Thirty-one persons made the good 
confession and united with God's people during our ten 
weeks in the Buckeye State. 

Our last meeting, at County Line, having been so inter- 
esting, wc continued for four full weeks and thus were 
privileged to spend Christmas with the Sugar Creek Breth- 
ren in their Sunday-school teachers' normal institute, re- 
luming home Dec. 29. 1906, where a little rest will be of 
profit after seventeen weeks of almost solid evangelistic 
work. D. W. Crist. 

Skidmore, Mo., Jan. 2. 



FROM BETHANY BIBLE SCHOOL. 



Jan. I, 1907, Bethany Bible School opened. All the old 
students save three arc present. Several new students 
arc here, and more arc soon to arrive. We have forty- 
four regular students and nineteen special students. 

Wc are compelled to have some of the classes in the 
church; also our chapel exercises. Bro. Lauver, who has 
charge of Bethany extension work, is here teaching sev- 
eral^ classes each day. Bro. Wieand is teaching Church 
Ordinances each evening in the church. This class is 
largely attended and much interest is being manifested. 

Brother and Sister Lear, of Cerrogordo, who had ex- 
pected to go to California, have postponed their trip and 
have enrolled as regular students. Bro. Andrews, Ottum- 
wa, Iowa, gave an interesting talk to a large audience this 
morning. We find our quarters very small indeed, and 
greatly feel the need of a home, but feel it will be given 
us in God's own time. The students continue the Home 
Bible class. May God use each student to help carry the 
Gospel to these darkened homes. C. May Manners. 

1SS Hastings St., Chicago, III., Jan. 4. 



FROM ROANOKE, LOUISIANA. 



The Sunday-school meeting of Texas and Louisiana con- 
vened with the Roanoke congregation Dec. 26. After 
devotional exercises and organization the several topics 
were discussed. Many good thoughts were presented that 
were inspiring, with essays and recitations. The spirit 
of the meeting was good, and showed that the several 
topics had been given consideration and thought. The 
duties and responsibilities of teachers, privilege sand du- 
ties of pupils, the need of more spirit and less form, and 
needed help for more efficient teaching, were all consid- 
ered and many good things said that will be quite helpful 
along these different lines. The subject of what the Sun- 
day school has done for the world and the church was 
ably discussed; also personal testimony of the great 
a i noun l of inspiration received at this meeting was lis- 
tened to with interest. A. J. Wine, Writing Clerk. 

Ft. Worth, Texas. 

NOTES NOT CLASSIFIED 

Handley. — Eld. J, B. Hylton came to our place Dec 27, 
and preached five interesting sermons. On account of 
rain the attendance was small. We have a good country 
for people of limited means. Will answer all questions for 
further information.— W. E. Burroughs, R. D. 2, Conway, 
Mo.. Dec. 31. 

Hudson.— Dec. 30 had been set apart for children's day 
service. Sister Nannie Ncher was to conduct it. At mid- 
night it commenced raining and kept it up nearly all day 
Sunday; so the children's exercise was postponed. Jan. 
5 the church met in council. Our elder, J. II. Nehcr, pre- 
sided. Wc reelected officers for the Sunday school; Uriah 
Blough superintendent. We are only few in numbers, 
but with Brother and Sister Neher at our head wc feel to 
take courage.— Rebecca Snavcly, Box 44, Hudson, 111., 
Jan. 7. 

Osceola church met in council Dec. 29. Our elder, H. M. 
Schwalm, presided. One letter of membership was re- 
ceived. The wife of our minister was installed into office. 
We elected our Sunday-school officers for the year; David 
Motts superintendent. — David Motts, Osceola, Ind., Jan. 5. 
Prairie View church met in council Jan. 5. Eld. D. Bow- 
man presided. One was received by letter and one letter 
was granted. Church officers were reelected, also Sunday- 
school officers elected; superintendent, Bro. Charley Mus- 
ser.— Ida Moomaw, Versailles, Mo., Jan. 5. 

Baugo.— Eld. Frank Kriedcr began meetings for us in 
the Baugo house Dec. 16 and closed last evening. Three 
were received by baptism and two more arc applicants. 
The church was much strengthened. — Christian Mctzler, 
Wakarusa, Ind., Jan. 7. 

Elkhart City.— Last evening we had a large house 
packed full of eager listeners to the rendering of the pro- 
gram of the union Christian Workers' meeting. Wc be- 
lieve all will look back upon this meeting with joy be- 
cause of its spirituality. These union meetings arc a ben- 
efit because they are full of inspiration. — S. C. Kindy, Elk- 
hart, Ind., Jan. 7. 

Washington.— On the last Thursday of the year the 
Washington City church was made to rejoice when before 
the prayer meeting service two young men were received 
into the church by the rite of baptism, our pastor admin- 
istering. The year's work has closed and another is be- 
fore us. We praise the Lord for the good work of the 
past and ask him to use us for good to our fellow-men 
and in his service now and in future years. Our joys are 
sometimes met by'sorrow, as was our experience on New 
Year's day, when Sister Carrie A. Westergrcn, a former 
missionary worker here and elsewhere, too, saw the life 
of her little boy of a little under two years leave, his suffer- 
ing body. Alvin Raymond Westergrcn is now over in the 
sunshine of heavenly bliss.— M. C. Flohr, 338 8th St., S. E., 
Washington, D. C, Jan. 4. 



' ij 



\ 



mam 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 12. 1907. 



THE ROUND TABLE 



IS THE FIRST DAY OF THE WEEK EVER 

CALLED SABBATH IN THE NEW 

TESTAMENT? 



BY CHAS. M. YEAROUT. 

While holding some meetings in Bedford Count), 
Virginia, I came in contact with some Seventh-day 
Adventists, among them two preachers who had 
offered a large sum of money (if I remember rightly 
about fifteen hundred dollars) to any person who 
would show in the Bible where the first day of the 
week was called Sabbath. The Greek word for 
Sabbath is sabbaton, and every place where the first 
day of the week occurs in the King James translation 
sabbaton is found in the Greek. And the German 
translation has it Sabbath or Sabbathcr, which means 
Sabbath. 

Sabbaton is universally translated Sabbath where 
it refers to the seventh day of the week, and Wilson, 
in his " Emphatic Diaglott " sometimes translates it 
Sabbath where it refers to the first day of the week. 
We have the consolation of knowing that both the 
Greek and German New Testaments use identically 
the same words when speaking of the Christian Sab- 
bath—the first day of the week— that they do when 
speaking of the Jewish Sabbath — the seventh day of 
the week. For example I will give four quotations, 
two from the Greek and two from the German. " Ofsc 
de sabbaton, tc epiplwskouse cis mian sabbaton." 
Translated, " Now after Sabbath, to the dawning into 
first Sabbath." Matt. 28: 1. " Kata mum sabbaton," 
"Every first Sabbath." 1 Cor. 16:2. Day is added 
bv the translators, it does not occur in the Greek in 
connection with sabbaton. 

"Auf eincn Sabbath abcr da die lunger cusammen 
kamen das Brod zu brechen." It is plainly stated 
here, On or upon the Sabbath. Acts 20:7. "Am 
Abend abet desseXbigcn Sabbaths, da die Jungcr 
vcrsammclt und die Thiiren verschlossen waren." 
The apostles were together on the Sabbath evening, 
etc. John 20:19. The Greek has sabbaton in both 
the above quotations. 

Nothing can be clearer than the fact that both the 
Greek and the German New Testaments call the first 
day of the week Sabbath. I found eight times where 
the first day of the week was called Sabbath in both 
the Greek and German Testaments. One of the 
Adventists, a German student, admitted that the Ger- 
man called the first day of the week Sabbath. But 
I never got the fifteen hundred dollars, though that 
I earned it was not denied. 

Mulberry Grove. III. 



'HE RESTORETH MY SOUL."— Fsalm 23: 3. 



BY J. S. M01ILER. 

The above passage indicates a soul at variance with 
God. A soul out of harmony with God cannot rest. 
" There is no peace to the wicked, saith my God." 
Isa. 57:21. 

The soul may deviate from the path of rectitude in 
various ways, and at any time. In this condition the 
soul of the godly seeks restoration, — rest, peace. 
David, though a man after God's own heart, at times 
wandered away from his Creator, but as soon as he 
discovered his mistake he sought restoration with God, 
with all the earnestness of his soul, until he had the 
assurance that his sin was pardoned. A godly man 
cannot endure to be at variance with God. 

God only can restore the erring in harmony with 
himself. David realized this ; hence the text above. 
God knows the needs of the soul, and has compassion 
for the erring; is the " Father of mercies and the God 
of all comfort." 

How sad were our condition if there was no one 
to restore us when we err! The burden of sin would 
become intolerable. It is a happy privilege for the 
godly that when they err they may approach their 
Maker by confession, and penitent prayer, with full 
assurance that he will hear their confession, and grant 
their prayers, and thus they will be restored to God 



again, and the soul will enjoy that peace that passes 
all understanding. 

We may not be conscious of any sin committed 
during the day, but God may see sin in us that we 
do not see; yet how comforting is our experience, 
when we look up to God in prayer, before closing Gin- 
eyes in sleep, and ask the Lord to restore our souls. 

Fairviezv, Kans, 



TURNING BACK. 



BY J. C. MAHORNEY, M. D. 

Readers, do you know how people are turning 
back from the foolish fashion in pretended religion 
which has been going at such breakneck speed? Wild 
fashion, gaiety and worldly attainment may please for 
awhile those who do not think seriously for themselves, 
but, thank the Lord, the plain old, old story touches 
the heart, gives something lasting, pleasing and ele- 
vating. Everyone knows that it is simple in its teach- 
ing of life's duties, and entirely safe for the dying. 

The broad world has begun to think, is becoming 
more anxious to retract and listen more closely to 
real judgment and be guided more by the Christ-life 
and spirit, — the plain Word. Brethren, preach on, 
pray and keep on doing and living that plain and 
simple life, the only one that can stand the test of both 
time and eternity. 

To the young ladies, to the young men, to the chil- 
dren, fathers and mothers, stop hunting for the uncer- 
tainties, for excuses, but take God at his simple word, 
simple and plain, add nothing, take nothing away; 
accept it now. Go and live and you will have the 
approbation of both God and man, the sweet peace 
of a clear conscience. That simple life is so easy to 
live, nothing misleading, no uncertainty, but an ab- 
solute and eternal word. 

Ladoga, Ind. 



A FRIENDLY WARNING. 



BY CATHARINE FURRY RURGER. 

We are to be a separate people from the world, 
" love not the world, neither the things that are in 
the world; if any man love the world, the love of the 
Father is not in him," etc. " For all that is in the 
world, the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes, and 
the pride of life, is not of the Father, but is of the 
world. And the world passeth away, and the lust 
thereof; but he that doeth the will of God abided 
forever." 

It is not simply belonging to the church, but we 
must live up to the requirements of the Gospel if 
we want to die happy. To the elders of the flock, 
of which the Holy Ghost has made you overseers, I 
would say, Cease not to warn every one night and 
day with tears; and when the chief Shepherd shall 
appear, ye shall receive a crown of glory that fadeth 
not away. If we are not very careful, my dear brethren 
and sisters, we may worship our many acres, our fine 
houses, our fine clothes, our gold watches and gold 
chains, more than the true and living God, who is in 
heaven interceding for his children. We are to search 
the Scriptures, " for in them ye think ye have eternal 
life, and they are they which testify " of us. 

New Enterprise, Pa. 



THE DIVORCE QUESTION. 



requesting that a committee of several members be 
appointed to formulate a paper and be empowered to 
attend to the interests and desires of the church along 
this line? The right of petition belongs to the people 
and it is one of the ways by which wrong laws may be 
bettered. While lamenting about the wretched con- 
ditions and laxity of the laws governing the marriage 
relation, we should do our share in remedying the evil. 



CHRISTMAS AT HOME. 



BY WM. C. KOONTZ. 

It is not an accustomed ruling of ours to remain at 
home on Christmas day, but this year the weather 
was so cold and stormy, that wife and I concluded 
we would stay by our own fireside, although we 
received several invitations out to dinner. 

The evening before Christmas we received the 
Missionary Visitor and our copy of " The Other 
Half of the Globe." We spent the day and part of the 
evening in reading. The day passed off quite 
pleasantly reading about the experiences of Brother 
Miller and wife in being tossed «ibout on the rolling 
billows of the great deep, and how they were rescued 
even from the very jaws of death and from a watery 
grave. 

I believe his last work is much like the wine at 
the wedding in Cana of Galilee, the best being reserved 
for the last. May his last voyage on life's billows be 
calm, peaceful and serene, and may he at last cast 
anchor in the haven of rest. 

Shady Grove, Pa. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TOPIC 

For Sunday Evening, January 20, 1907. 



CHRIST IN ME.— John 6: 56. 



Purpose. 

1. To make us perfect. John 17: 23, 26. 

2. Tn reveal Christ to the world. Gal. 1: 16. 
How is Christ in me? 

1. Through faith. Eph. 3: 17. 

2. By examining ourselves we may know. 2 Cor. 13: 5. 
Results. 

1. There is no condemnation. Rom. S: 1. 

2. We are made alive. 1 Cor. IS: 22. 

3. The hope of glory. Col. 1: 27. 

4. Triumph in Christ. 2 Cor. 2: 14. . 
What greater good can any one seek? 

PRAYER MEETING 

For Week Beginning January 20, 1907. 

FIVE WARNINGS FROM A GODLESS HOUSE- 
HOLD OF BIBLE TIMES.— Mark 6: 14-29. 



BY J. S. FLORY. 

Now that a united effort is being made by the 
various denominations of the United States to petition 
congress for a more uniform divorce law to govern 
all States alike, and especially in regard to having the 
laws of our country more nearly, if not entirely, to 
conform to the teaching of the Gospel as to cause for 
divorce, I have thought our Brethren should awake 
to the opportunity offered to be heard among the rest 
of the organizations en this important subject. The 
Presbyterians only quite recently passed resolutions 
and appointed a committee to see that they were placed 
on record as favoring the good effort. Would it not 
be a good thing* for one or more of our church districts 
to send up a petition to our next Annual Conference, 



1. Against Hatred.— " Set herself against him." Verse 19. 
Herodias, like many others, declared war against the 
preacher of righteousness, because her sins were re- 
proved. It's a great mistake! " He that hatcth his 
brother is a murderer." 1 John 3: 15. 

2. Against Worldly Pleasure. — "The daughter of Hero- 
dias herself came in and danced and pleased Herod." 
Verses 21, 22. Solomon tried to gain happiness from 
worldly pleasure and found but vanity. Eccl. 2: 1. In 
Isaiah's time there was feasting that was not pleasing 
to God. Isa. 5: 11, 12. A life of pleasure is but death 
to the soul. 1 Tim. 5: 6. All carnal pleasure is Satan's 
hed into which he casts his victims. 

3. Against Rash Promises. — "Whatsoever thou shalt ask." 
Verses 22, 23. The wise men would have us remember, 
not to be "rash with thy mouth." Eccl. 5: 2. "Death 
and life are in the tongue," because there is power in 
our words for either good or evil. Better let the feet 
slip than the tongue. 

4. Against the Fear of Man. — " For the sake of them that 
sat." Verses 26, 27. Saul sinned against his God and 
then excused himself by saying, "I sinned because I 
feared the people." 1 Sam. 15: 24. "The fear of man 
bringeth a snare." Prov. 29: 25. The best remedy 
against the fear of man is to get a vivid sight of " God 
with us." Isa. 41: 10, 13, 14. 

5. Against Acts Which Will Bring Remorse.—" John, 
whom I have beheaded is risen." Verses 14-16. One 
of the saddest thoughts about any sin is the remorse 
that follows. David said, "My sin is ever before me." 
Psa. 51: 3. Judas realized that he had "betrayed in- 
nocent blood," but it was then too late to undo the 
awful deed. Peter wept bitterly because of his denial 
of Christ, and the loving Master forgave him, but 
doubtless the memory of his mistake caused many sad. 
hours in later years, 



I 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 12, 1907. 



23 



HOME AND FAMILY 



JANUARY. 



I'm little January, 

Perhaps you do not know 
How far I've come to see you 

Across 'the fields of snow. 

I've lots of little sisters, 

A little brother, too, 
And everyone is coming 

To make a call on you. 
But I got ready quickly, 

And came right straight off here, 
To be the first to greet you, 

This happy bright New Year. 

— Youth's Companio 



NEEDLE AND THREAD. 



BY MARGUERITE BIXLER. 

The beautiful needlework wrought by some of the 
women and young girls in Palestine is very interesting 
to me. Greatly surprised was I when I took a piece 
of lace work from a native woman's hand and began 
to examine it. The regularity, preciseness and 
evenness with which the pattern was made, were 
remarkable. She had been following us for twenty or 
thirty minutes, but as an American usually will do — 
I judged her ability by her outward appearance, and 
therefore paid little attention to her gesticulations. 

After I saw the beautiful work she did and was told 
that in this way many of these poor women get what 
little money they have, I never permitted any to pass 
without a friendly inspection. I have one pattern 
that measures seventy inches in circumference, and 
this, too, was made with a common sewing needle. 

One dear native lady, living in Nazareth, brought 
her laces to our camp and begged me to take some of 
her work to America and sell it for her, offering me 
to take as much as I would and not pay her anything 
for it until it was sold. I was in her home and am 
sure that she makes good use of the little she can 
earn. She is a follower of the Master, who was born 
in this same village. And I promised her I would 
introduce her work among my lady friends, believing 
that good will come from this, even though we cannot 
now see all the way. It has been oftentimes verified 
that much good can be accomplished with a con- 
secrated needle. 

It is said that the needle of a missionary's wife was 
the simple instrument God used to give access to 
oriental zenanas. A piece of embroidery wrought by 
her deft fingers found its way to the secluded inmates 
of a zenana. To know that a woman did the work 
interested them, and with the consent of the husband 
this Christian woman was welcomed into his home. 
As she taught his wives the art of embroidery, she was 
also weaving the scarlet thread dyed in the blood of 
the Lamb into the more delicate fabrics of their 
hearts and lives. 

We read with interest of the good work done by 
Dorcas of Joppa. As I was shown the traditional 
place where this consecrated woman once lived, com- 
paring the account of her life with the condition of 
woman in the land to-day, I thanked God for the 
divine Gospel taught by the Friend of Mary and 
Martha, but wondered why there are so very few con- 
secrated ones endeavoring to perpetuate this same 
teaching where he first taught it. Words cannot con- 
vey an adequate conception of the low estate of women 
in almost all the empires where the Gospel has not 
pervaded and moulded social life. Some one has said, 
" Christ is the magnet of humanity, and she has found 
the best and highest vocation who brings most souls 
diseased, within the healing power of his immortal 
Gospel." May the Holy Spirit so breathe upon the 
Dorcas societies that they, with their quiet, modest 
service, may bring many people unto him. 

" Beneath the desert's rim went down the sun, 
And from their tent-doors, all their service done, 
Came forth the Hebrew women, one by one. 

" For Bezalcel, the Master, — who had rare 
And ciiFions skill, and gifts beyond compare, 
Greater than old Miriam's greatest were — 

"Had bidden them approach at his command, 
As on a goatskin, spread upon the sand, 
He sat and saw them grouped on every hand, 



"And soon, as came to pass, a silence fell; 
He spake, and said: 'Daughters of Israel, 
I brins a word; I pray ye hearken well, 

"'God's tabernacle, by his patjern made, 
Shall fail of finish, though in order laid. 
Unless ye women lift your hands to aid!' 

"A murmur ran the crouched assembly through 
As each her veil about her closely drew — 
' We are but women! What can women do? ' 

"And Bczaleel made answer: 'Not a man 
Of all our tribes, from Judah unto Dan, 
Can do the thing that just ye women can! 

"'The gold and broidcred work about the hem 
Of the priest's robes — pomegranate, knop and stem, 
Man's clumsy fingers cannot compass them. 

"'The sanctuary curtains, that must wreathen be 
And 'bossed witli cherubim, — the colors three, 
Blue, purple, scarlet, — who can twine but ye? 

"'Yours is the very skill for which I call; 
So bring your cunning needlework, though small 
Your gifts may seem; the Lord hath need of all! ' 

"O Christian women! for the temples set 
Throughout earth's desert lands, : — do you forget 
The sanctuary curtains need your broidery yet?" 
East Akron, Ohio. 



us are lacking in evidences of God's chastening love. 
What a stride forward the kingdom would make if 
we all welcomed our blessings as they deserve! — 
Sunday School Times. 



BV C. H. STEERMAN. 

Home is the foundation of civilization. Americans 
are a home-making people. Home is the fountain- 
head of Christian religion. Moral men and women as 
well as Christian men and women come from moral 
or Christian homes. Paul says in Eph. 6:4, "Ye 
fathers, provoke not your children to wrath; but bring 
them up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord." 

The things taught in the home give more to the 
character of our children than do sermons and lectures, 
newspapers and books. Then how careful we should 
be as to how we conduct our homes, for what is 
planted in the heart of the youth will grow out in the 
future. Home training is something of great im- 
portance. No other teachers have the acknowledged 
divine right to instruct as the parents. The future life 
of the child is under their hands. They can make it 
send forth waters of bitter or sweet, for death or for 
eternal life. Parents must teach by example ; precept 
has no authority unless backed by example. 

For the children's sake we ought to banish from the 
home everything that has the appearance of evil, and 
should try to keep in store the things that make home 
happy. When envy and hatred get into our homes 
let us use Bible words to kill them. Such words as, 
" Little children, love one another," etc., for where 
love is there is happiness. 

What does it take to make a home happy? It is not 
the paintings on the wall, or fine lawn, or the beautiful 
orchards; the furnishings of the home. You can take 
all these away and yet home will be happy. But when 
there is a loving father or mother, brother or sister 
taken away, there is a dark gloom comes which brings 
sorrow to every heart. Home is what we make it. 
We should live to make others happy, as well as our- 
selves. Let us teach the blessed words of Jesus in 
our homes, with prayer continually that will make 
home happy and pleasant. 

Martinsburg, W. Va. 



BLESSINGS OF ADVERSITY. 



It is easy to theorize about the blessing of adversity 
when we are not blessed that way. It is not so easy 
to rejoice in such blessing at the time when we most 
need to do so. Indeed, when a child of God shows 
entire readiness to take the Father at his word, it 
comes as something of a surprise even to that one's 
fellow Christians. Here, for instance, are a few sen- 
tences in a letter, that are refreshingly unusual: " You 
may have forgotten me," writes the correspondent; 
" if so, I will remind you that I am one whom God 
has greatly blessed with affliction, and has seemed to 
love more than many others. ' Whom the Lord loveth 
he chasteneth.' . . . My body and lower limbs 
are very weak, but my arms, sight, and mental powers 
are comparatively strong. I have so many blessings, 
I want to praise him as much as I can." Very few of 



SISTERS' AID SOCIETY OF PLEASANT VALLEY, 
INDIANA. 



We met Dec. 27, 1906, and elected Sister Emma 
Sheck president and secretary for the coming year. 
During last year we held fourteen meetings, with an 
average attendance of twelve. We sent $5 to the 
colored mission, $5 to the Kansas City mission and 
five boxes of bedclothes and clothing were divided 
among the St. Joseph mission, Kansas City mission and 
the Old Folks' and Orphans' Home at Mexico, Ind. 
Our society is growing, and we hope to do more and 
better work during the year 1907 than we have in the 
past. We have a balance of $12.15 in the treasury. 
— Mary Cripe, Middlebury, Ind., Dec. 31. 



SISTERS' SEWING SOCIETY. SHANNON. ILL. 



During the year 1906 our society held twenty-two 
meetings with an average attendance of ten. At the 
beginning of the year we had $7.59 in the treasury. 
We received $2S.95; sent $5 to the Brooklyn mission; 
$2 to the Lake Arthur mission; $10 to the church in 
India, and $5 to the Wisconsin mission. Our expenses 
amounted to $7.68, thus leaving a balance of $6.86 in 
the treasury. We sent a barrel containing seventy 
pieces of clothing (old and new) and two comforts 
to the St. Joseph mission, and another of about the 
same amount to the Chicago mission. Our work con- 
sists mostly in quilting, knotting comforters and sew- 
ing carpet rags. May God bless all such work. — Etta 
Kreider, Sec. and Treas., Shannon, 111., Dec. 24. 



SISTERS' SEWING CIRCLE. B 
CHURCH, PA. 



;g SWATARA 



From Jan. 25 to Dec. 27, 1906, we held twelve 
meetings, with a total attendance of 201, and an 
average attendance of sixteen. During this time we 
made eleven quilts and four comforts, besides aprons 
and other articles of wear. Seventy-five aprons were 
made and sold by the circle. Ten dollars was given 
toward the Harrisburg church debt; 106 garments, 
two quilts and two comforts were sent to St. Joseph, 
Mo. ; two quilts, one comfort and thirty-seven gar- 
ments were donated to poor whites in Tennessee, and 
a barrel of provisions and a box of chickens were sent 
to Brooklyn, N. Y. We contributed liberally at home 
where help was needed. At the beginning of the year 
we had $4.39 in the treasury; received $61.42; ex- 
pended $47.76, leaving a balance of $8.28 in the 
treasury. We elected officers for the coming year as 
follows: Lizzie A. Balsbaugh, president; Clara Kuhns 
and Jennie A. Cassel, vice-presidents; Lillie B. Casscl, 
secretary; Elizabeth Shiffler, assistant secretary; and 
Kate Horst, treasurer. — Lillie B. Cassel, Hoerners- 
town, Pa., Dec. 27. 



FREDONIA AID SOCIETY, KANSAS. 



Since our last report, six months ago, we have held 
twenty-nine meetings with an average attendance of 
seven; total attendance was two hundred and twelve; 
the average collection, $1.21 ; the total collection, $35. 
We received $21.97 for work done, articles sold and 
donations. Amount paid out for various purposes was 
$47.03. Before Christmas we filled a large box with 
four comforts and numerous articles of clothing and 
four dollars in money, and sent it to the Kansas City 
mission. Amount in the treasury, $1.95. — Syra Sell, 
Sec, Fredonia, Kans., Dec. 28. 



DORCAS SEWING SOCIETY, GIRARD, ILLINOIS. 



The society met Dec. 26, with ten members present, 
to prepare goods to send to the Springfield, 111.. 
mission; value, $12, and also to Chicago; value, $28. 
The boxes contained quilts, comforts and second-hand 
clothing. Our society was Feorganized, with Sister 
Mary Heckman, president; Mary Ann Brubaker, vice- 
president; Mary A. Brubaker, treasurer; Ada Snell, 
secretary.— Marv A, Ames, Girard, 111., Dec. 31, 



■ 



Hi 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 12, 1907. 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER 

A RELIGIOUS WEEKLY 

PUBLISHED BY 

Brethren Publishing House 

Publishing Agent 

The General Missionary and Tract Committee, 

22 and J4 South State Street, Elgin, III. 



SUBSCRIPTION, 



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5 Editors 1 Grant Mahan, A.*sociate Hditoi 
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(^"All business and communications intended for the paper shouk 
be addressed to the BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE. ELGIN. ILL 
qnd not to any individual connected with it 



Entered at the Post Office at Biffin, 



, aa Second-class Mattes 1 



Bro. M. R. Myers, of Chicago, preached in Elgin 
last Sunday morning and evening. His sermons were 
very much appreciated. 

We learn from the secular press that the Brethren 
at Garden City, Kans., have purchased the Quaker 

meetinghouse at that place. 

Bro. D. E. Ennis wishes us to announce that his 
address has been changed from Mansfield, Mo., to 
Cement, Okla., R. F. D. No. 1. 



Nineteen made the good choice at West Greentree, 
Pa., during a series of meetings closing Jan. 2. Bro. 
Henry Holsinger did the preaching. 

Those who send obituaries of children for publica- 
tion will please read the short notice which appears at 
the head of the obituary department each week. 



Bro. N. N. Garst, of Piney Flats, Tenn., is in a 
position to give his time to pastoral work wherever 
he may be needed. He is open for an engagement. 



North Manchester College, Ind., has arranged 
for her Special Bible Term to open Jan. 28, and con- 
tinue two weeks. The program provided will prove 
helpful. 

The Bethany Bible School, Chicago, reports a very 

large attendance for the special Bible work. In order 
to find room for all in attendance the school had to be 
moved into the church. 



Bro. Reuben Shrover is holding revival services 
in the Salem church, Ohio. Eleven have been baptized 
and two restored to fellowship. Two others are yet to 
receive the initiatory rite. 



Next Sunday. Bro. Andrew Hutchison is to begin 
a series of meetings at Glendora, Cal. In February 
he holds a revival in Pomona, and later will visit other 
points in Southern California. 



The little band of believers in Cuba continue their 
work, as shown by their report for our columns. In 
time there will be others to help and then work can 
be undertaken on a larger scale. 



Hardly a week goes by that we do not receive, for 
publication, an article, a death notice or a report 
of church news with the writer's name omitted. One 
should think that by this time people would know 
better than to send anonymous communications to a 
newspaper, for such matter is not published, and often 
not even read. 

Let no church correspondent hesitate about sending 
church news for publication in the Messenger. 
Though we may sometimes receive more reports than 
we can find space for, we do not look upon a surplus 
of matter as a burden. When we have too much we 
do some cutting down, and that too without com- 
plaining. This is a part of our business and we do 
the work cheerfully. See editorial remarks following 
the report from Blue Ridge church, 111., on page 
21 of this issue. 

The attendance at the Sunday School Teachers' 
Institute of Southern Ohio, recently held at Covington, 
shows that our people in Ohio know how to show 
their appreciation for a good thing. The regular 
enrollment for the term is said to have been over four 
hundred, and among the number were one hundred 
and thirty-four Sunday-school superintendents and 
teachers in addition to two hundred and forty-two 
Sunday-school pupils. A work of this kind in any 
State district is sure to produce the very best of results. 

Under date of Dec. 21, Sister Ella Miller writes us 
from Messina, Italy, saying, that the missionaries 
were then well and enjoying their trip across the 
Mediterranean. They had reached Naples ten days 
before, and having a week at their disposal, before the 
sailing of their ship for India, they visited the city of 
Rome and other places of interest. If all went well 
the three have already reached India and will soon 
begin preparing for their work. 

The trustees of the Old Folks' Home, Iowa, will 
soon commence the erection of a large new building, 
near Marshalltown. The building is to be 32 by 60 
feet, two stories, and will be well fitted up for the 
care of the aged and poor members in that State, who 
have no home of their own. Eighty acres of land have 
been set apart for the Home, and it is on this land 
that the building is to be erected. The purpose is 
a commendable one upon the part of the members in 
Iowa, and those having plenty of means at their 
command should give liberally in the interest of such 
a charitable undertaking. It is the duty of the Lord's 
people to take good care of their poor. 

We are opening a new department to be known as 
The Round Table, one page being set apart for the 
purpose. Scores of our patrons have something they 
would like to say briefly, using from two hundred to 
three hundred words, to present what they have in 
mind. In this department will be found the Christian 
Worker and Prayer Meeting outlines. The rest of the 
page, so far as possible, will be devoted to short, 
pointed and interesting articles. At most district 
Sunday-school meetings is a round table exercise for 
those who have something of interest that can be pre- 
sented very briefly. Let us have the spice of your 
thinking for the Messenger round table. 



The Botetourt Normal College, Daleville, Va., is 
out with an announcement for a Special Bible Term, 
beginning Jan. 27 and closing Feb. 10. A good pro- 
gram has been arranged for the occasion. 



A revival in the Pleasant Ridge congregation, Pa., 
conducted by Bro. W. F. Spidle, closed Dec. 30, with 
seventeen accessions by confession and baptism. One 
was restored to fellowship and one is yet to be baptized. 



The Locust Grove meetinghouse, Indiana, has just 
been repaired, and last Sunday was the day set for 
the dedication services, with Bro. Aaron Moss to 
deliver the dedication sermon. A revival meeting is 
to follow. 



The editorial concerning G. J. Fercken, which 
appeared last week, was written and- published as 
directed by the General Missionary Committee. It 
was deemed proper to let the Brotherhood know as 
much as possible about the real situation. 



We have on our desk, from the Hope Publishing 
Co., Chicago, a number of biographical sketches of 
Bible characters, such as Abraham, David, Jacob, 
Samuel, Joseph, Moses, Ruth, etc., twelve in all, put 
up in a neat booklet form and sold at from five to ten 
cents, postpaid. When ordered in quantities they may 
be had cheaper. From start to finish these sketches 
are made up of scriptural quotations, that is, the lives 
of men and women are given in Bible language, and 
to most people these sketches will prove both interest- 
ing and instructive. The same company has put out 
the " Life of Christ " in the same interesting style, 
for fifteen cents, in paper cover; twenty-five cents in 
cloth. Also a similar history of "His Friends " and 
the life of " His Great Apostle," or the Apostle Paul. 
Price the same as the " Life of Christ." It is interest- 
ing to observe how the lives of Bible Heroes can be 
made up, throughout, with scriptural quotations. 
These little booklets are used extensively in Sunday 
schools, and some pastors make use of them. 



Some of our people, we learn, are wasting their 
time and postage writing a few of the railroad com- 
panies in the West for free transportation to the 
Annual Meeting next spring. We wish to remind 
them and others of the fact that by recently enacted 
law, and the decision of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission, the granting of free passes came to an 
end at the close of 1906. People who now travel on 
the railroads must pay. This is true of newspaper 
men as well as others. The day for free passes on 
railroads has come to an end. All of those who attend 
the Los Angeles conference in May must pay their 
railroad fare and one person is not going to secure 
any more favors than another. 



Mt Morris College is now in the midst of its 
Special Bible term of 1907. The course of instruction 
provided for in these special terms invariably proves 
helpful to those who are so fortunate as to attend. 
And, by the way, our special Bible terms are never 
as largely attended as they should be. Each minister 
in the Brotherhood, especially the younger ones, ought 
to spend one or two weeks in a good Bible term every 
year. The help received would enable him to preach 
better sermons, and do his work much easier. We 
were with the Brethren over last Sunday, and met a 
fine audience both morning and evening. On Monday 
morning, in the chapel services, we met a very interest- 
ing body of wide-awake students. We are pleased with 
the progress the present college management is 
making. The instructors are proficient in their depart- 
ments and are giving excellent satisfaction. The 
outlook for Mt. Morris College is good. 



We wish to call special attention to the queries 
intended for the Annual Meeting, found in this issue. 
The object in publishing these queries in the Mes- 
senger is to have our people look into the merits of 
them carefully before they are presented in the open 
conference for consideration. While studying them 
we might consider the advisability of the Annual 
Meeting making any ruling at all on some of the 
questions. The apostolic conference at Jerusalem 
acted on " necessary things " only. The Annual Con- 
ference will do well to limit her efforts to necessary 
things. If queries call for changes, the grounds or 
reasons for such changes ought to be we'll considered. 
Possibly, some of the questions have already been 
discussed and acted on. If so, we should consider 
whether any further action is necessary. It would ' 
prove helpful if all the delegates and others, could 
study each query, before starting to the Annual Meet- 
ing, so as to be able to discuss the question involved 
understandingly and vote on it intelligently. 



THE ACCESSIONS FOR 1906. 



Sister Mary.Hoff, of New Windsor, Md., reads 
all the church news appearing in the Messenger, from 
week to week, and now writes that during the year 
1906 our published reports show that 4,992 persons 
were baptized and 330 restored to fellowship, making 
a total of 5,322. The year before there were 5,390 
baptized and 399 restored, total 5,789. It will thus be 
seen that there lias been a falling off in conversions, 
there being nearly 400 less baptized in 1906 than in 
1905. There were also 69 less restored to fellowship 
last year than during the year previous. Taking the 
additions to the church as a whole, and we have 5,789 
for 1905 and 5,322 for 1906, a falling off of 467. Since 
there are about 850 congregations in the Brotherhood 
the figures would indicate that the accessions average 
a little over six for each church. While this shows a 
gain in the membership of the Brethren church, still 
it is not what we would like to see. While we are not 
able to account for the decrease in the number of 
conversions, it might, however, be well to bear in 
mind that 1905 was the best harvest for souls in'the 
history of the Brethren church since 1S97. Our 
report for 1906 shows a considerable increase over the 
report for 1904, during which year 4,149 were baptized 
and only 226 reclaimed. Possibly, taking everything 
into consideration, there are no grounds for dis- 
couragements. Yet, we ought to do a better work for 
the Lord, not that we are seeking numbers, but the 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 12, 1907. 



25 



church ought to be the means of converting more 
people. May we not pray the Lord to give all of 
us more power for good, that we may be able to lead 
sinners to Christ by the score rather than a few at 
a time? The Lord's people, by the help of the Holy 
Ghost, ought to show better results. Still we must 
not forget to thank the great Father for what has been 
done. The saving of five thousand souls is no small 
matter. 



WHAT IS LIBERTY? 



Letting people do as they please is not the right 
way to reform them. Parents have tried it with their 
children to their ■own sorrow. They found the plan 
to be a failure. No school-teacher would think 
of permitting his pupils to be governed solely by their 
own ideas of right and wrong. He is presumed to 
g '■ know the better way, and it is his duty to train those 
entrusted to him accordingly. No government, how- 
ever liberal, could be induced to permit all her citizens 
lo do just as they please. To do so would mean 
anarchy. 

In view of these facts what must be thought of 
the man who maintains that the church should permit 
her members to do just as they think proper? If some 
of them desire to observe the ordinances of the house 
of God, they can do so, otherwise they may remain 
faithful members and pay no attention to any of the 
commands. If they wish to be baptized, it is their 
privilege, but the church will not require it. She 
prefers to have her members made wholly responsible 
to God for their conduct. 

Methods of this sort would pave the way for some 
other conditions. If a church member may do as he 
pleases about obeying the commands, may he not also 
do as he thinks proper about drinking whisky? What 
is to hinder him from playing cards, attending dances 
and doing some gambling? What is in the way of bis 
taking part in the Sunday baseball game instead of 
going to church ? 

If liberty means for one to do as he pleases respect- 
ing the. New Testament ordinances, why may he not 
do .as he pleases about the other things ? The fact 
of the matter is, those who talk and write so freely 
about men and women, both in church and state, 
doing just as they please, do not always mean just 
what they say. Their theory is a misleading one and 
it does not require much reasoning to show it. 

The Gospel teaches liberty, but not liberty to disobey 
the commands set forth in the New Testament. The 
church should allow her members all the liberty that 
may be for their good, but not liberty to disrespect 
the church and pay no attention to her demands. 
Liberty does not mean license. One is granted liberty 
to do right, and the New Testament tells what is right 
and what is wrong in matters pertaining to religion, 
while the church justly claims that it is her privilege 
to help interpret 'the Gospel, and assist in determining 
what may be permitted and what not. Is there any- 
thing unreasonable about this? 



THE SHEPHERD'S RESPONSIBILITY. 



We hear of a congregation where the pastor by 
arbitrary and injudicious ruling has welhiigh driven 
all the spirit out of his congregation. It is possible 
to drive the spirit out of a church and destroy the 
body, but woe unto the man found guilty of such work. 
The members composing a congregation are the 
Master's flock, his sheep and lambs, and for the 
shepherd to drive any of them away from the fold is, 
in the sight of God, a criminal act: for by so doing 
the shepherd may be the cause of their loss. Peter, 
an elder, was told by the Master to feed his lambs 
and sheep. He was not instructed to whip the sheep 
and throw clubs at them. The elders at Ephesus were 
instructed to take heed unto themselves and to all the 
flock, over which the Holy Ghost had made them 
overseers, and to feed the church of God. Acts 20: 28. 
Elders should rule, but they must rule well,' not by 
driving the sheep and lambs from the flock, but by 
feeding, comforting and directing them aright. 

Shepherds are placed in charge of the flock of the 



Lord by the Holy Ghost, and at the judgment bar 
of God will be held responsible for every member 
entrusted to their care. It is a terrible thing for a 
minister to sin against his own body, but it is yet 
more terrible when he, by his injudicious methods, 
drives saints out into the world to be swallowed up 
by sin. Jesus was patient, painstaking and ever ready 
to help those who made mistakes, and when about to 
close his work upon the earth, told his Father in 
heaven that of those he had given him he had lost 
but the one. How good it would be if all elders, 
and even other officials, could have such a fine sense 
of the real value of a church member. 

When the owner of a large number of sheep en- 
trusts a few hundred to a shepherd, to feed and care 
for, he expects the shepherd to account for every sheep 
that is missing from the flock. He must know whether 
the missing sheep died, was stolen, devoured by 
animals or went astray. Then he must know whether 
the shepherd has done his full duty in caring for the 
sheep. It is not sufficient for the shepherd to report 
that he received into his care two hundred sheep and 
now he has one hundred and ninety-five. The owner 
will demand a full and explicit report concerning the 
five lost sheep. He may find the shepherd in fault. 

Is it too much to conclude that, in the winding up 
of affairs, the Master will require each elder, bisho, 
or pastor to render a careful report of his work as a 
shepherd? Will he permit careless and indifferent 
shepherds to neglect the flocks over which the Holy 
Ghost has made them overseers, and not call them to 
account? Will he merely wink at pastors and 
preachers, who, by their injudicious methods, drive 
weak members away from the fold of safety ? 



THE TWO IFS. 



This may seem to be an empty subject to talk about. 
The subject of itself may be empty enough. But empty 
as it is, it is full enough to fill a world of minds and 
hearts. Coming home to our experiences, have we 
ever had anything to do with the word? And if so r 
under what conditions? 

Let us look at the little narrative as found in Mark 
9: 14-29, and see if we cannot there find why it is 
•that the " if " comes to us as often as it does. Suf- 
fering, whether in our own experiences or the ex- 
periences of others, always brings a sadness of heart 
and a desire that it might be removed. Its presence 
interferes with our enjoyments, our plans and our 
purposes in life. And because of this we have the 
universal desire that it may be removed. Hence the 
wisdom, the antidote. The man that can remove all 
suffering would be considered the great benefactor of 
the world. 

Here we have a father who had been looking upon 
a greatly afflicted son for years and years so that it 
proved the great affliction of his life. And you know 
what our experiences are in reference to the " great " 
affliction of our homes and in our lives. How often 
have we said: If only this "one thing" could be re- 
moved, then we would be happy. All of our other 
annoyances and ills become eclipsed by this one. Re- 
move this and we would have a cloudless sky and we 
would bask in a perpetual sunshine. 

On this child the father had fixed his energies, mind 
and heart. Remedies had been applied, .physicians 
called. And hearing of the new Gospel, its promulga- 
tors and what they had been doing, — opening eyes, un- 
stopping ears, making the lame to walk and fevers to 
subside,--they too are called. But no relief comes. 
Last of all the Christ comes along, the greatest of all 
physicians, and his help, his mercy, is implored. It 
seems to be a hopeless case. But the desire exceeded 
the doubt. He explains to him the character of the 
disease, and then says: "If thou canst do anything, 
have compassion upon us and help us." It was a most 
pitiful plea. If he could do anything for the afflicted 
one, the plea comes on the grounds of mercy and help. 

He makes or antecedes his request with a condition, 
and the Christ antecedes his answer with another con- 
dition. Both contain the " if " in them. And, as we 
see, the one " if " is dependent upon the other. " If you 
can heal my son, have compassion and help us." " If 
thou canst believe," I can heal your son, is the gracious 



answer. And the father, in earnestness and tears, 
cries out, "Lord, I believe; help thou my unbelief." 
And the son was healed. 

How many hundreds and thousands of homes have 
we to-day in which there* are cases of suffering ones. 
And as loving fathers and mothers read this touching 
case, — the appeal and the loving response, — does not 
this thought loom up in their hearts, Why cannot I go 
in the same way and receive the same answer? Why 
not? Well, let us try and see. First, let us say that 
when the same results follow or may follow, we be- 
lieve, that under similar conditions, the same healing 
will come. 

But let us look at the thing from another standpoint. 
Is the healing of our diseases and freedom from bodily 
pain the greatest blessings which our heavenly Father 
can bestow upon us? If our time of living for enjoy- 
ment was as long on this side as it is our privilege to 
hope it may be on the. other side, the life beyond, or 
even if it were comparatively so, then might we be 
the more anxious and concerned about our physical 
conditions while here, and make that among our special 
requests to the Lord. 

But when we are made to understand that this life, 
compared to eternity in time, is but as a moment and 
that these very short sufferings here greatly add to our 
eternity of enjoyment in the life beyond, it should en- 
able us to take a different view of the things which 
come to us through the providences of God. Suffering 
has a ministry about which all of us have not yet 
learned ; and about which, when we do learn, some of 
the ifs that now disturb our peace and try our faith 
will be interpreted in a way that will add to our as- 
surance instead of feeding our distrust. 

Do we know that our capacity for suffering is al- 
ways exceeded by our capacity for enjoyment? And 
that our capacity for suffering is developed through 
these physical and mental strains that come to us? 
This being so, then in greater proportions ■ is our 
capacity for enjoyments developed. Now, if the com- 
paratively short time we have here to endure pain de- 
velops in us a like capacity for enjoyment in the ages 
of possible bliss, what ought our attitude to be towards 
the sufferings that come to us here ? 

The man in the narrative had only one interpretation 
for pain. And the present — this life — was the haven 
for enjoyment. Take this away from his boy and him- 
self and all was lost. He could not see as did the 
apostle Pa.ul that these trials and sufferings here could 
work out for them a more eternal weight of glory in 
time to come. Hence the Christ gave the father the 
desire of his heart in the way that he could most fully 
appreciate it. Had he been a child of God in the sense 
in which Paul was, and in the sense in which we may 
be, he might have had compassion upon him and 
showed him his loving mercy in a different way. And 
the same is true of us, we do not always get 
the thing we ask for and yet our prayers are 
answered if our part of the condition is met. 
If we ask according to his will, the promise 
is that we shall receive. Now it is the purpose of 
the Lord that we shall receive the things which he 
knows are best for Us, Now if we ask for wealth and 
pleasure when we need fire and affliction, if we really 
believe and love, he gives us the fire and affliction be- 
cause these are the things which we need for our high- 
est good. We are disappointed and doubt comes. We 
are made to say: "If thou canst, why not?" Even 
with God there are limitations. Christ could not cure 
the boy unless the father believed. If there is one " if," 
it takes another to meet the condition. There are hun- 
dreds and thousands of things that Christ could do 
for us were the other " if " affirmed as it was in the case 
referred to. The father's faith made it possible for 
the son to be healed. 

And so our faith makes it possible for our prayers 
to be answered. On our believing, the Lord acts. In 
some cases we cannot believe because we have no foun- 
dation on which to build a hope. We hope only for 
things which come within our bounds of reason. And 
when we go beyond our scope of reason we overstep 
our possibilities of faith, so that, after all, if we would 
be happy we must, in all our asking, submit ourwills 
to his will. " Not my will, but thine, be done." 



wm 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 12, 1907. 



ANNUAL MEETING QUERIES. 



The following" queries intended for the next Annual 
Meeting- have reached us: 
Oklahoma. 

1. We, the members of the Hoyle church, petition An- 
nual Meeting through district meeting so to decide that 
a member guilty of the sin of John 8: 3 may be held a 
member on proper acknowledgment and confession of the 
wrong, if lie asks forgiveness of the church. 
Passed to Annual Meeting. 

2. Inasmuch as there is so much confusion of mind in 
the water at the time of baptism caused by nervousness 
from various conditions of the body coining in contact 
with the water, more especially in the young, thus render- 
ing the mind incapable of intelligently answering ques- 
tions, also an improper state of mind for the reception of 
the Holy Ghost; therefore: We, the Paradise Prairie 
church, ask district meeting of 1906 to ask Annual Meet- 
ing to grant the administrator the privilege of asking the 
questions before entering the water, and the laying on 
of hands and prayer be postponed until clothes are 
changed and a convenient place is secured. 

Answer by district meeting. — Yes. See Matt. 3: 16; 
Acts S: 14. 17, and 37. 

Middle Missouri. 

1. We petition Annual Meeting through district meet- 
ing to authorize Standing Committee to instruct com- 
mittee on credentials. 

Passed to Annual Meeting. 

2. We petition Annual Meeting through district meet- 
ing that brethren shall not advertise for sale brethren's 
clothing and sisters' bonnets and other like articles, such 
as are not recognized by the church as being the order 
of dress as understood by the Annual Meeting decision. 
Passed to Annual Meeting with answer: Articles of ap- 
parel should not be advertised as Brethren's clothing that 
are not in harmony with Annual Meeting decision. 

Northeastern Kansas. 

We, the Abilene church, assembled in council, petition 
Annual Meeting through district meeting to request the 
Publishing House to publish death notices of children 
under five years of age in the Messenger. 

Answer. — Passed. 

Southwestern Kansas. 

We, the Newton church, petition Annual Meeting 
through district meeting of Southwestern Kansas and 
Southern Colorado to instruct the various district mis- 
sion boards to publish their annual statements in the 
Gospel Messenger. 

Request granted and sent to Annual Meeting. 
Northern Indiana. 

1. South Bend Church (First Brethren).— Owing to the 
fact that many of our brethren work in factories and for 
corporations who demand their services on Sundays as 
well as on other days, thus making it very embarrassing 
to refuse; and not complying with their demands often 
jeopardizes their situation and causes them to lose their 
employment; therefore, we petition Annual Meeting 
through district meeting to say to what extent, if any, 
brethren may be allowed thus to labor on Sunday. 
Answer.— Passed to Annual Meeting. 
2. Owing to the fact that our Annual Conference is a 
religious body of the highest authority of the church but 
much of her spiritual influence many times Is lost by un- 
favorable location and surroundings. We, the First Breth- 
ren church of South Bend. Ind., therefore petition An- 
nual Meeting through district meeting to recommend that 
hereafter state districts in which the Annual Conference 
is to be held, and committees on location appointed by 
sa>d district, shall give preference to Chautauqua grounds 
wherein to hold the meeting when such grounds are 
available. This shall also be an inducement in favor of 
locating the meeting by Standing Committee. 
Answer.— Passed to Annual Meeting. 
-3- Nappanee Church.— We ask Annual Meeting through 
district meeting of Northern Indiana, to reconsider Art 
8. 1897, page 13, "Revised Minutes of Annual Meeting" 
and adopt the following: That no brother can serve as a 
member of Standing Committee, or as an officer of An- 
nual Meeting, more than two years in succession; nor 
more than two years in four, and that the terms of serv- 
ice shall date from 1908. 

Answer of district meeting and passed to Annual Meet- 
ing.-No brother can serve as a member of Standing 
Committee more than two years in succession; nor more 
than two years in four, and that the term of service shall 
date from 1908. 

Tennessee. 

Since the district in which the Annual Meeting is held 
is responsible for the payment of any deficiency that may 
occur, we, the Pleasant Hill church, ask the district meet- 
ing to pct.tion Annual Meeting to say that one-half of 
the net proceeds of the Annual Meeting shall, or may, re- 
main ,n the diftnet in which the said Annual Meeting is 

held. Approved and. gent to Annual Meeting. 



Middle Indiana. 

Huntington Church. — Is it consistent with the Breth- 
ren church and the spirit of the Gospel for brethren to 
anoint those who have been dismissed from our fellow- 
ship? 

Answer. — No. Sent to Annual Meeting. 
Middle Iowa. 

1. Report of Annual Meeting locating committee ac- 
cepted, and the same committee continued. Annual 
Meeting for 190S requested. Committee: S. B. Miller, 
John Zuck, W. E. West. 

2. Panther Creek church petitions Annual Meeting 
through district meeting that all queries having been 
ruled upon twice by Annual Meeting shall, when ruled 
upon again by majority vote, be settled, and may not 
again be brought before the Annual Meeting before a 
term of ten years, unless on account of changing condi- 
tions it should so develop as to make it important that 
such query be reconsidered in a shorter period than here- 
tofore specified. It shall then be enjoined upon Standing 
Committee to recommend the reconsideration of such 
query, the same to be spread upon the minutes for one 
year and then come up at Conference as regular business. 
Passed to Annual Meeting. 

North Dakota, Northern Minnesota and Western Canada. 

1. Snyder Lake church, Bowbells church, Pleasant Val- 
ley church, request this district meeting to call for An- 
nual Meeting in 1908. 

Answer. — Passed to Annual Meeting. 

2. We, the members of the Bowbells church, of Bow- 
bells, North Dakota, ask Annual Meeting through district 
meeting: Is it wrong, according to the Gospel, for a 
brother who is elected to the office of clerk of the district 
court to serve in said office where gospel principles must 
be violated, such as swearing in of jurors, witnesses, etc., 
and to avoid above violation of gospel principles, he has 
his deputy perform these duties for him. and thus claims 
he violates no gospel principle? If wrong, what should be 
done in such a case? 

Answer.— Paper passed to Annual Meeting. 

3. We, the members of the Bowbells church, of Bow- 
bells, North Dakota, ask Annual Meeting through district 
meeting: Is it wrong for a brother, especially an elder 
or minister, to serve in the office of county commissioner 
in this age of political corruption? If wrong, what should 
be done in such cases? 

Answer. — Passed to Annual Meeting. 

Should there be other queries they should be for- 
warded to us without delay. 



brethren, or a plain bonnet for the sisters. If there 
is not plainness throughout, the plain coat and the 
plain bonnet cut no figure whatever. We are of the 
opinion that our people stand greatly in need of much 
teaching regarding real gospel plainness, and gospel 
simplicity. 



OUR INDIA MISSION. 



The Christian Herald for Dec. 26, contains a very 
interesting account of the Brethren mission in India, 
accompanied by a good illustration of the orphanage 
at Bulsar. Bro. W. B. Stover's photograph is shown 
in one corner of the illustration. After describing the 
mission and some of the work done the article closes 
with this touching paragraph : 

At Dahanu, India, missionaries Adam Ebey and wife, 
Mrs. Alice King Ebey, of the Dunker Brethren Mis- 
sion, have lost their three little children, John, Mary 
and Paul, in rapid succession. Adapting herself to 
what she believes to be the teachings of 1 Corinthians, 
chapter 2, little Mary's mother always wears a prayer 
covering when praying, and little Mary, ready to fol- 
low in the footsteps of her mother, insisted that if her 
mother had a special covering for prayer times, she 
must have one also. And after a while her mother 
made her a little white cap, which she always put on 
and wore in prayer, as if she were one of the saints 
of the olden times. 



WHAT CHURCHES ARE DOING. 



CONSISTENCY IN PLAINNESS. 



May we not be defeating our purpose in maintaining 
gospel plainness and simplicity, by prescribing an order 
that permits the use of costly material as well as that 
which is more in keeping with the New Testament idea 
of plainness? And then, who is the more consistent, the 
one who dresses plainly, without conforming to the or- 
der, or the one who conforms to the order, but always se- 
lects fine goods for his clothing? 

One thing is certain, the one who selects costly ar- 
ray for his use violates the Gospel, whether he' had 
his clothing made in the order of the church or not. 
The Gospel demands plainness in the Christian attire. 
Fitting fine, costly goods over a plain pattern does 
not make the garment plain. The form of plainness 
may be there but the material is not what the New 
Testament requires. One having plenty of money 
might order a plain gold band for his otherwise plain 
hat. The Gospel forbids the wearing of gold as an 
ornament. The mere fact of the band being plain 
would not change the condition. The man should 
still be called to account for violating the Gospel by 
wearing gold as an ornament. This principle should 
apply to those who have fine, costly attire, cut in the 
order of the church, trusting that the order will over- 
balance the other. Of the two classes named, the for- 
mer is the more consistent, and yet it would be easy for 
the plainly-attired man to have his plain clothing in 
the order. Let not the one refuse to comply with the 
order simply because his clothing is plain, nor should 
the other justify himself in wearing costly array sim- 
ply because his clothes are in the order. Furthermore 
the brethren who purchase costly array and have It 
made m the order of the church, and the sisters who 
wear a plain headdress above the latest fashion of the 
world, along with ruffles and other ornamentations 
are defeating the very purpose of our prescribed order 
of attire. The purpose is to maintain plainness, but 
the clear violat.on of the New Testament cannot he 
covered up, or atoned for by a plainly cut coat for the 



The Baptists in New York City are not making 
much headway. There are said to be seventy Bap- 
tist churches in the city, with an investment of $5,000,- 
000 and an expenditure, last year, of $400,000, and yet 
the net increase was only nine members. The report 
says that the other wealthy churches have done little 
better. This shows that there is something radically 
wrong with the churches and their methods in New 
York. They seem to be spending enough money, yet 
there are practically no results. But these are not the 
only churches that are accomplishing little in the way 
of converting sinners. It might be well for all of our 
churches to consider what they are doing in the way 
of saving the lost. If they have been the means of 
leading none to Christ during the last year, the Lord 
may well ask, Why? The Master never contemplated 
that churches should merely live. He means that they 
should more than exist. It is a part of their work to 
bring the lost sheep into the fold. 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER. 



■ V f ,y re,, S' rra ? Journal, 16 large pages, is published 
in the interest of the Brethren church, and is the only 
church paper published by the authority of the Confer- 
ence. Price, $1.50 per annum. 

It most earnestly pleads for a return to the apostolic 
order of worship and practice. 

It holds that the Bible is a divinely-inspired book, and 
recognizes the New Testament as the only infallible rule 
ot taith and practice for the people of God. 

It also holds to the doctrine of the Trinity; teaches 
future rewards and punishment, and emphasizes the im- 
portance of a pure, holy and upright life before God and 

It maintains that only those who remain faithful until 
death have the promise of eternal life; 

That Faith Repentance and Baptism are conditions of 
pardon, and hence for the remission of sins; 

That Trine Immersion, or dipping the candidate three 
times face-forward, is Christian Baptism; 

That Feet-Washing, as taught in John 13, is a divine 
command to be observed in the church; 

•J2"« "r L ° rd ' S . S " P r Cr ,'f , a me , aI ' a " d ' in connection 
with the Communion, should be taken in the evening or 
after the close of the day; 

That the Salutation of the Holy Kiss, or Kiss of Char- 
ity, is binding upon the followers of Christ; 

That War and Retaliation are contrary to the spirit 
and self-denying principles of the religion of Jesus Christ; 

That a Nonconformity to the world in daily walk dress' 
customs and conversation is essential to true holiness and 
cnnstian piety. 

It maintains that in public worship, or religious exer- 
cises, Christians should appear as directed in 1 Cor. 11: 

It also advocates the Scriptural duty of Anointing the 
sick with oil in the name of the Lord. ' 

In short, it is a vindicator of all that Christ and the 
Apostles have enjoined upon us, and aims, amid the con- 
flicting theories and discords of modern Christendom to 
point out ground that all must concede to be infallibly 
sate, .Send for sample copy. Address; 

Brethren Publishing House, Elgin, 111, 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 12. 1907. 



General Missionary and Tract Departmetii 



. It. ittlller, 
. W. Teeter, 



Illinois I H. C. Early, - - Virginia 
Indiana I O. D. Bontaok, - - D. C. 
John Zucfe, Iowa. 

AdHress all business to 
Oeneral Missionary and Tract Committee, Blgln, III, 

MORE MEMBERS NEEDED. 



When one gets in new localities where but few mem- 
bers are living, he is impressed with the need of a larger 
number in order that our church life may be lived before 
men and they may see what we stand for. And the more 
of such localities one visits, the deeper the impression 
that is made upon him. He cannot but feel that there 
are not enough members to supply the demand. If an 
attempt were made to locate a representative congrega- 
tion wherever one or more members have located, the 
result would be weakened congregations all over the 
Brotherhood; and it is not improbable that more harm 
than good would be done. 

Of course no such an attempt would be contemplated, 
and the condition is mentioned merely to show that the 
church cannot depend entirely or very largely on emigra- 
tion to districts where our doctrine is not known. Some 
must go if the message of salvation is to be proclaimed; 
but they are to be teachers and preachers rather than con- 
gregations. Emigration has played a very important part 
in the spreading 'of the truth, and without it we should 
have a smuch smaller number of congregations and our 
membership would not be what it is. But we need to 
bear in mind that our main mission is the conversion of 
those who have-not yet believed on the name of the Lord 
Jesus; and wc must not forget that the consistent lives 
of the few have a greater influence than the eloquence 
of the preacher if his words are not lived out by the mem- 
bers who have accepted the truth in its entirety and prom- 
ised to be a separate people, zealous of good works. 

These thoughts were in my mind on a recent visit to 
Arkansas. A comparatively small number of members of 
the Brethren church live there; but they want more; they 
need more, especially ministers, of whom there is so large 
a surplus in some local churches. They have done well 
temporally, have a good reputation, and if the whole doc- 
trine of the New Testament were presented it is likely 
that some of the people would be willing to be baptized 
and learn all the things commanded by the Master and his 
apostles. To carry the glad tidings to those in sin and 
ignorance, those who have never been taught the right 
way, is of vastly more importance, of infinitely greater 
profit, than to have added field to field and to ha've in- 
creased one's income beyond what he needs for himself 
and family. 

We do not have, and this generation can hardly hope to 
have, members enough to supply the needs of places on 
the frontier. More members are wanted in order that a 
greater number of churches may be organized and the 
light of the Christian religion may be seen by many who 
have not experienced the joy that it brings. But we do 
have preachers who might go. There is plenty of material 
for them to work on. And the best way, the only way, to 
get the congregations is to convert men and women, bring- 
ing them out of the kingdom of Satan and into the king- 
dom of Christ. That is the mission of the church. There 
must be a reaching out, a going out, after the lost. The 
whole body cannot go, but it can and should send. It is 
doing more sending now than it has since its early history. 
But who will say that the limit has been reached? There 
is no limit to the advance that may be made. 

This is very far from meaning that our forces are to be 
scattered and our energy wasted. The fact that there is 
much to do is an added reason why greater care should 
be taken to use the means at hand to the best possible 
advantage. It is impossible to organize in one or five or 
ten years churches in all the places where we should like 
to see them and where they really ought to be. But it is 
possible by working wisely to have more this year than 
we had last year, and more next year than we have now; 
and so on until time shall be no more. Time and patience 
and labor and Christian living are necessary to win peo- 
ple for the Lord. A very small per cent are ready to ac- 
cept the first invitation, and these are not always a help 
to the church. 

These loyal ones on the frontier deserve the assistance 
and the prayers of the Brotherhood. To live according to 
the directions of the Book means more there than it does 
where one is surrounded by those of like faith and where 
the doctrine of the Brethren is so well known that the 
members are not expected 10 do as others do. There are 
temptations where we are, not known that never com? 



where we have long been established. By helping in the 
work, by taking one step at a time, and always forward, we 
shall finally reach the goal and receive'the reward, having 
been instrumental, to some extent, in supplying the world's 
greatest need — Christianity. g. m. 

♦ <S> <3> 
FROM VADA, INDIA. 



want of early instruction would be 



Lately we were made glad by the coming of Brother 
and Sister Dan Lichty to visit us. They have been at 
Nasik for a couple of months trying to get rid of the 
malaria fever that has been in their systems, also to gain 
much needed strength. We are glad that, they are feeling 
much better, and with them we hope and pray that they 
may continue strong for the Lord's work in India. 

It is always a time of rejoicing when those of our num- 
ber come to see us. In the midst of environments which 
are continually downward and away from God we crave 
each other's prayers and companionship. 

Our work is moving along nicely, but not without its 
discouragements, of course. 

A few days ago one of the workers said to the" other, 
"Why do not people come to the house and talk religion 
as they did at first? " There arc a number of reasons that 
might be given, such as our being out to the villages, 
people busy, etc., but the chief reason is that those who 
would come are hindered by relatives. This condition 
confronts the missionary everywhere in India. 

The inquirers after the truth are no less; but they are 
secretly enquiring the "good old way." 

Last week we were favored with a visit from Dr. Yerc- 
man. He had previously written us that he wanted to 
tour some of the villages, so for two days and two nights 
we visited a number of the villages, giving medicine to the 
sick and preaching the Word. The people in the villages 
do not run to a stranger for medicine. 

They say, "Who knows what they will do?" When 
Bro. Lichty's were here some of the more ignorant people 
said, "Look out! The old sahib (meaning me) will draw 
them and the new sahib will make Christians out of the 
people." 

When doctor was here, some of the village people said, 
"Look out! the young sahib will catch us and doctor will 
take us and go." And many of those who know better 
do not object to the ignorant ones thinking so, as in this 



way, for a time at least, 
gospel message. 

In this country, when 
place to live and work, 
"What will he give us?' 
For example, during one 



it becomes a hindrance to the 

a missionary goes into a new 
he first idea the people get is, 
not spiritually, but temporally, 
of the Hindoo sums or holiday 
seasons a couple of our neighbors came to the door for 
money, as is their custom. Upon being refused they said, 
" We thought when sahib came to our town to live we 
would get money;" and this spirit of covetousness is man- 
ifest everywhere. And when Christ was on earth he found 
this same condition, " Ye seek me, not because ye saw the 
miracles, but because ye did eat of the loaves and were 
filled." 

At this time we are having with us Eld. S. N. McCann 
and family, and Eld. W. B. Sfover and Bro. J. M, Pitten- 
ger. 

The Brethren are looking for a permanent location for 
Bro. Pittenger's. 

Bro. McCann and family arc on their first and perhaps, 
for some time, their last visit to Vada. We are indeed 
sorry to have them leave us; for our field, as a mission, 
is large, "the harvest great; but the laborers few." 
We welcome the new workers to India. 

Steven Berkebile. 
Nov. 26. 

<S> <s> <?> 

THE IMPORTANCE OF EARLY RELIGIOUS 
CULTURE. 



Death makes a perpetual drain upon all our homes and 
churches, and the virtues which now sanctify so many 
of them will soon exist only in memory on earth ; for 
they will come floating back to us from the speaking dead, 
like angels' songs from the better land. And how shall 
we perpetuate these virtues, and keep our lights burning, 
without early religious culture? We arc free to confess 
that we do not know of any other way; and we do not 
believe that it is possible for the human family to prosper 
morally or spiritually without attention to this important 
interest. For if the doctrines of the Gospel are to con- 
tinue to spread, and to exert a salutary influence among 
men, they must have faithful ministers to proclaim them, 
and a holy church to sustain them. Our depleted ranks 
must be filled with new recruits from the ranks of child- 
hood and youth — with youth having tender hearts and an 
earnest love for holiness and truth; and how can these 
be obtained if we neglect the early religious culture of 
our children? They cannot be obtained under such cir- 
cumstances, and we need not expect it. 

The heathen of old knew that all such expectations 
were groundless; hence, when Antipater demanded of the 
Lacedemonians fifty of their children as hostages, they 
replied that they had rather surrender fifty of their most 
eminent men, whose principles w?r? already formed, than 



children to whom the 
a loss irreparable. 

And still many professedly religious parents make no 
effort, and exert no influence, to impart early religious 
culture to those they love. They leave them to obtain 
their knowledge of God and moral duties of life by ac- 
cident, m -the highways and byways of earth The Sab- 
hath school is about the only organized effort in opera- 
tion designed to impart the early religious culture needed" 
and yet how few parents realize its importance, or make 
any earnest effort to interest their children in this im- 
portant branch of education. Daniel Webster realized the 
importance of Sabbath schools, for he said, "They lead 
our youth in the paths of truth and morality, and make 
them good men and useful citizens. As a school of re- 
ligious instruction, it is of inestimable value; as a civil 
institution, h is priceless, and has done more to preserve 
our liberties than statesmen and armed soldiers." 

Thomas Jefferson once said that " Rurkc never uttered 
a more important truth than when he exclaimed that a 
religious education was the cheapest defense of a nation " 
And he added that " the Sabbath school presented the 
only legitimate means, under the constitution, of avoid- 
ing the rock on which the French republic was wrecked." 
That rock was infidelity. 

But few parents neglect the bodies and minds of their 
children, or fail to impart the needed care and culture; 
but many neglect their children's morals entirely. They 
forget that although it may he very important that their 
children should he able to speak and write correctly, still 
that it is much more important that they should be taught 
to feel and act correctly in all the relations of life. 

And still, if they arc to be thus taught, the important 
work must be commenced early, and before the mind has 
been polluted or the heart soiled with vice. "The rock 
that turns the edge of the purest steel hears the impress 
of the leaf received long before it had become hardened 
by time and the elements." And so it is with the heart 
of childhood; impressions made upon it while it is yet 
tender will remain like the stars which God has placed 
upon the brow of night, which is the same from age to 
age. 

Then let the important work of religious culture com- 
mence early, and continue uninterrupted. Drop the small 
seeds of virtue and religion into the hearts of children 
while they arc yet young and tender, and they will soon 
spring up and hear fruit to the honor and glory of God. 

Waynesboro, Pa. W. IT. Englcr. 



RETROSPECTIVE— PROSPECTIVE. 



The year 1906 is past. It will pass into history notable for 
material prosperity. But as we point with pride to our 
rapid progress along all other lines, have wc had a corre- 
sponding increase even in church membership? Have we 
not turned our attention almost exclusively to temporal 
affairs? Have we also been "zealous nf good work"? 
Titus 2: 14. Have we also been "fruitful in every good 
work and increasing in the knowledge of God"? Col. I: 
10. Have we lowered Gnd's ideal of man? Have wc be- 
■ come self-centered? tt is too nearly true that religious 
responsibilities generally receive other than the first place 
in our plans. 

The powers that we have, the influence that we wield, 
the opportunilies that we use, and the possibilities that wc 
assert, insignificant as they may seem to us as they pass, 
arc the means to bring the world to Christ. Had we lived 
up to our possibilities, what results! Now and then we 
sec one who seems to have almost, if not altogether, 
reached the full height of usefulness. But there are so 
many who bear no part of the work. This weakens the 
zeal and power of the whole body, and defers the coming 
of the kingdom of God. 

The past wc cannot undo, hut the dawn of a new year, 
bright with its possibilities, is before us. We should not 
spend it mourning over the losses of the past. Weeping 
bitter tears will not amend past neglects or abuses. Nei- 
ther will they lead one life to a higher plane. "The mill 
will never grind with the water that has passed." 

Lot us accept the grave responsibilities and blessed 
privileges of the new year with a new sense of its true 
value. The right time, the best time to do right, is now. 
"Act in the living present." Let us use each moment as 
they come and. when 1907 closes, wc may not have so 
many regrets. 

Let the love of God be our desire. Let all other things 
be subesrvicnt. The strength of Christianity, at any time, 
is accurately measured by the number of those who love 
him, and the intensity with which they do so. Love to 
God grows by being constantly in his company, by com- 
munion (prayer) with him, by observing the beauty of his 
character and by remembering all his benefits, as the days 
come and go. 

Let the accomplishment of his will be our endeavor. 
I et us train our wills to conform to his will. Then we 
will delight to be doing those things that always please 
him. John 8: 29. 

I et the fulfillment of his kingdom in our hearts be our 
prayer, each day, during the year, and its closing days wil 
be a time of rejoicing and thanksgiving. Let our spiritual 
growth at least keep pace with our material development. 
« Whether therefore ye eat. or drink, or whatsoever ye do, 
do all to the glory of God." 1 Cor. 10: 31. 

Hardin, Mo, 



■ 



2S 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 12, 1907. 



Notes From Our Correspondents 



"As cold water to a thitsty sent 






ivs from n far country.' 



CALIFORNIA. 

Chico.— We expect to commence a series of meetings 
Tan 27, conducted by J. Overholtzer. We have labored 
"for a little over one year at this place. Wc are holding 
weekly services at the Baptist mission chapel in one of 
the city suburbs. — A. J. Peebler, Chico, Cal., Dec. 31. 

Inglewood.— Bro. Andrew Hutchison gave us a soul- 
stirring sermon on Christmas day. We are blessed now 
with an abundance of rain and sunshine, and so far we 
have had a very mild winter. Sister J. S. Flory is very 
low.— T. M. Calvert, Inglewood, Cal., Dec. 31. 

East Los Angeles church met in council Dec. 28, with 
our elder. G. F. Chamberlin. presiding. One letter was re- 
ceived. Sister Bertha Barklow, who is our worker at 
Channing street mission, gave an encouraging report. 
Officers for the two Sunday schools for the coming year 
were elected. Bro. J. W. Ciine was elected superintendent 
for the east side, Bro. G. H. Basehore superintendent for 
the Channing street mission; he also has charge of the 
preaching service at that place. The writer was appointed 
church correspondent. Our Bible class meets at the 
church every Monday evening, with S. G. Lehmer as 
teacher. We are studying the book of John. — Sarah Kims, 
Los Angeles, Cal., Dec. 29. 

Santa Ana church met in council Dec. 29, Eld. W. J. 
Thomas presiding. Our Sunday school was reorganized: 
Sister Minnie G." Eby superintendent. Sister Hazel Eby 
secretary. Bro. Thomas' time as our elder had expired 
and as he desired to be relieved Bra H. A. Whisler was 
chosen to succeed him. Our Sunday-school attendance 
keeps up well and we all feel encouraged to press on. We 
hope ere long to have a minister permanently located 
among us, as "the mission board are now trying to make 
such arrangements. This will he greatly appreciated by 
all of us, for while our pulpit has been ably filled each 
Sabbath, a resident minister will give greater stability to 
our work.— Laura D. Eby, Tustin, Cal.. Dec. 29. 

Tropico church met in council Dec. 22, with our elder, 
S. G. Lehmer, in the chair. Elders A. Hutchison and D. 
A. Norcross were with us. Sunday-school officers for the 
year were elected. We decided to make some improve- 
ments in the interior of our church. An agent for the 
Messenger was appointed. One was restored to member- 
ship and then received into the second degree of the min- 
istrv. Eld. A. Hutchison began a series of meetings at 
this place Dec. 9 and closed Dec. 16.— Clara B. Wolfe, 
Tropico, Cal., Dec. 27. 

COLORADO. 

Fruita.— Christmas services were conducted by Eld. S. 
Z. Sharp, after which a collection of $7.66 was taken for 
the Denver mission. Dec, 23 a collection of $5 was taken 
for the St. Joe, Mo., mission. I failed to report in my 
previous report that a collection of $25.03 was taken on 
Thanksgiving day for missionary purposes. Our Christ- 
mas program was given Christmas night. — Alma Hertzler, 
Fruita, Colo., Dec. "30. 

IDAHO. 

Nampa church met in council Jan. 1. Our elder, N. S. 
Gripe, not being present, Bro. J. H. Gray bill presided. 
Officers were elected for the church the coming year. 
Solicitor for foreign mission, Sister Erne Neher; Messen- 
ger agent. Sister Sallie Clater, and the writer church cor- 
respondent. Sunday-school officers were elected: Sister 
Sarah Crill superintendent. We decided to have teachers' 
meeting in connection with the mid-week prayer meeting. 
We expect Bro. Felthouse to commence meetings for us 
Jan. 6. On Christmas day we had short talks from sev- 
eral. — J. S. Brower, Nampa, Idaho, Jan. 2. 
INDIANA. 

Elkhart Valley church met in council Dec. 29, with our 
elder, Bro. Frank Krider, presiding. Four members were 
received by letter. Brethren I. D. Parker. J. Metzler, 
Christian Metzler and John Stafford were with us to assist 
in the work. Bro. EH L. Heestand was ordained as elder, 
the ordination being conducted by Bro. Parker, assisted 
by Bro. Stafford. — Linnie E. Bartmess, R. D. 6, Elkhart, 
Ind.. Jan. 5. 

Ft. Wayne church met in council Dec. 28, our elder, John 
Calvin Bright, presiding. Bro. I. M. Miller was chosen 
president of Christian Workers and the writer Superin- 
tendent of the Sunday school. The Sunday-school con- 
vention for this portion of the State was held at this place 
Dec. 30, and a very helpful and instructive program was 
rendered. In the evening a large and attentive audience 
listened to an interesting Christmas program given by the 
school. The work in the Sunday school for the past year 
has been encouraging. We notice in particular the grow- 
ing missionary spirit. The school supports an orphan in 
India with birthday offerings and also sets aside the col- 
lection of the first Sunday of each month for missionary 
purposes. At the beginning of 1906 our school offered re- 
wards to the children who would attend fifty Sundays or 
more, also those who attended between forty-five and fifty. 
Gifts were given to nine of the first class and five of the 
second.— Isabella D. Stover, R. D. 3, Ft. Wayne, Ind., 
Jan. 5. 

Landessville. — Bro. J. F. Spitzer commenced a series of 
meetings Nov. 24, closing Dec. 19. On account of sickness 
of his wife he was called home. He preached thirty ser- 
mons. Some were almost persuaded to be Christians. — 
Mary C. Baker, Box 78, Landess, Ind., Dec. 29. 

Lower Deer Creek.— The year 1906 made many changes 
in the Lower Deer Creek congregation. At the beginning 
of the year there were eighty-nine members. During the 
year fourteen were dismissed by letter, four were disfel- 
lowshiped, and one died. Fourteen were received by let- 
ter and eighteen by baptism, making a gain of thirteen. 
One of those received by letter was an elder. One deacon 
was lettered out and one deacon died. Two deacons were 
elected. The new year finds the church in peace and unity, 
with regular preaching services each Lord's Day and an 
evergreen Sunday school. The Sunday school intends to 
support an orphan in India during 1907. — J. G. Stine- 
baugh, R. D. 3, Camden, Ind., Dec. 31. 

North Manchester.— On New Year's day we met in spe- 
cial called council. It was decided that our presiding 
elder, Bro. A. L. Wright, should give his whole time to 
the care of the church, and also that we build a new 
churchhouse in town, so that all services pertaining to the 



church may be held there. Our present house is much 
too small. Bro. England is with us in a series of meetings. 
—Mary E. Neher, North Manchester, Ind., Jan. 2. 

North Liberty. — Bro. Isaac Frantz began a series of 
meetings Dec. 8 at our house in town. He delivered nine- 
teen sermons, closing Dec. 23. Two precious ones were 
baptized. Both were heads of families whose companions 
were already members. Quite an interest was created 
ihroughout our village. — Winnie E. Cripe, R. D. 2, North 
Liberty, Ind., Dec. 30. 

Notice.— By action of the late district meeting of the 
Southern District of Indiana, the mission board was in- 
structed to formulate a plan to secure aid to pay the 
indebtedness existing against the new house of worship, 
known as the Fountain churchhouse, Ripley county, the 
youngest congregation in the Brotherhood. It is there- 
fore ordered by said board that each congregation in our 
district appoint a special solicitor to canvass the members 
of their respective congregations for funds for this worthy 
purpose and forward same to district treasurer, Bro. John 
F. Shoemaker, Shideler, Ind. A small donation from each 
congregation will aid in making this place self-supporting. 
— J. S. Alldrcdge, Foreman, Anderson, Ind., Dec. 31. 

Somerset. — Bro. H. L. Fadely completed his two weeks' 
series of meetings on last evening at the Cart Creek house. 
Four have had their robes washed in the blood of the 
Lamb,, being the heads of two families. We as a church 
are much built up spiritually. — Elzworth Weimer, R. D. 9, 
Wabash, Ind., Dec. 31. 

St. Joseph Valley. — We have just closed a two-weeks' 
revival meeting, conducted by Eld. Geo. D. Zollers, with 
three restored to fellowship. We regret that Bro. Zollers 
could not remain with us longer, but duty calls him to 
Ohio, where he will labor for the Lord for three months. 
We held our council - Dec. 29, and selected Eld. H. W. 
Kricghbaum to fill the vacancy caused by the death of 
Eld. D. P. Miller.— D. S. Cripe, R. D. 4, South Bend, Ind., 
Jar. 1. 

Union City.— We held our council meeting Dec. 15, at 
which time the business of the year was satisfactorily dis- 
posed of. Officers for the year 1907 were chosen. Breth- 
ren W. P. NorTsinger and EH M. Scholl were elected Sun- 
day-school superintendents. Bro. E. M. Scholl was elected 
president "of the Christian Workers. The average attend- 
ance at Sunday school during the year was sixty-five, and 
the average at the Middletown mission was forty-five. 
During the past year there were three baptized, two re- 
stored, one received by letter; five were given letters and 
three aged members died. Several letters have not been 
handed in yet, and there were about twenty baptized at 
the close of last year. — Dora Noffsinger, R. D. 35, Union 
City, Ind., Jan. 3. 

IOWA. 

English River congregation is moving along. Brethren 
W. D. Grove and H. W. Coder were recently elected Sun- 
day-school superintendents for six months. We had a good 
and profitable service on Christmas day. Our Christian 
Workers' meetings are interesting and profitable. — Peter 
Brower, South English, Iowa, Jan. 2. 

Fairview church met in council Jan. 5. We reorganized 
our Sunday school; Bro. Chas. Berry superintendent. Eld. 
Abraham Wolf was elected for church correspondent and 
Messenger agent. Bro. T. A. Robinson was here in Octo- 
ber, Drcaching eighteen s.ermons. The church was much 
edified.— Abraham Wolf, Udell, Iowa, Jan. 6. 

Franklin County church met in council Dec. 29, our 
elder, Wm. H. Pyle, presiding. We elected our Sunday- 
school officers for the coming year, with Bro. Ezra Burn 
superintendent. We reorganized our Christian Workers' 
meeting for the next six months, with Sister Lottie Sutter 
president. — Elsie A. Pyle, Hampton, Iowa, Jan. 1. 

Notice.— To the Brethren of the District of Northern 
Iowa, Southern Minnesota and South Dakota: All those 
wishing to pay their subscription to the Old Folks' Home 
prior to April I, 1907, can do so by sending it to C. Fred- 
erick, who will promptly receipt for the same. We intend 
to build early in the spring, and want to get some material 
on the ground this winter. — C. Frederick, Grundy Center, 
Iowa, Jan. 3, 

Notice. — The board of trustees of Brethren's Old Folks' 
Home of Iowa will in the near future commence the erec- 
tion of a new main building, on the eighty-acre farm near 
Marsha 11 town selected for that purpose. Dimensions 
of building : thirty-two by sixty feet, two stories high; 
first story ten and one-half feet, second nine and one- 
half feet high. It will contain sixteen bedrooms 
nine and one-fourth by eleven and one-fourth ieet; dining 
and sitting room .each fifteen by twenty feet; also base- 
ment under all. Part of the old building is reserved for 
kitchen. New building will be built of brick, double wall, 
outside pressed brick. Any donation or subscription from 
our district thankfully received; also those having sub- 
scribed, please remember when your subscription falls 
due, and send same to proper person. By order of board. 
— C. B. Rowe, Sec, Dallas Center, Iowa, Dec. 28. 

Salem.— Our Sunday school begins the new year with 
Bro. Henry Walter superintendent. Our school has re- 
cently sent $11 to the district mission board, $2.75 for the 
Brooklyn churchhouse, a box and a 1 barrel of provisions 
with $1.80 in cash for the New Year's dinner at the St. Jo- 
seph mission. — Mamie Sink, Lenox, Iowa, Jan. 1. 

South Waterloo church convened in council Jan. 1, with 
Eld. A. P. Blough presiding. We held our annual election 
of officers. Three letters were received and three granted. 
We expect Bro. E. B. Hoff with us in February to hold a 
Bible institute. — Samuel Sweitzer, Waterloo, Iowa, Jan. 4. 

KANSAS. 
Grenola church has for the past few days been enjoying 
a feast of good things. On Christmas day Brother and 
Sister F. H. Crumpacker began to give us Bible lessons 
and continued until Dec. 30. We took up the study of the 
Sermon on the Mount, studying especially the subjects 
of N on resistance, Non swearing, Secrecy, and Noncon ■ 
formity. Sister Crumpacker gave us lessons on prayer. 
The teachings of both instructors were clear and forcible. 
Sunday at 11 A. M. Bro. Crumpacker gave an excellent 
talk to the young people; in the evening Sister Crum- 
packer gave an appealing talk about China. Following 
was a good sermon on the " Great Opportunity " by Bro. 
Crumpacker. The Grenola church is better equipped to 
do work for God. The consecration meeting Sunday even- 
ing was very impressive. A collection of about $11 was 
given them. We felt like we were sending out mission- 
aries.— Geo. R. Eller, R. D. 3, Molinc, Kans., Dec. 31. 



Larned. — Our Bible normal and series of meetings be- 
gan Dec. 10, and closed Dec. 19. Bro. J. Edson Ulery 
gave us some interesting and soul -ins pi ring lessons. 
There were fourteen that decided to-live for Christ. They 
were all Sunday-school pupils. What an influence the 
Sunday school has on the young minds. One awaits bap- 
tism.— Lala V. Hylton, R. D. 2, Larned, Kans., Jan. 1. 

Pleasant View church met in council Dec. 29. The 
church elected A. F. Miller elder for next year. Bro. Roy 
Walden was elected Sunday-school superintendent. The 
church appointed a committee of three to secure an evan- 
gelist to hold a series of meetings in the near future. Sun- 
day morning Bro. John Wise gave us one of the old stand- 
by sermons.— A. W. Finfrock, Box 66, Darlow, Kans., Dec. 
31. 

LOUISIANA. 

Roanoke. — The members of Southwestern Louisiana 
and Texas met at Roanoke, La., Dec. 26 for Sunday- 
school meeting, Dec. 27 for ministerial meeting, Dec. 28 for 
district meeting. One paper goes to Annual Meeting. 
These meetings were well attended; much interest was 
taken and a good spirit prevailed. Dec. 29 we held our 
love feast. Seventy-two communed. The house could not 
hold all the lookers-on. Bro. L. H. Eby officiated at the 
feast, was with us in our meetings and preached for us 
each night. Dec. 30 he preached a very able sermon at 
10 A. M., and also at 7:30 P. M. Dec. 31, Bro. Eby will 
begin a Bible normal and will instruct us for two weeks 
and preach each night. — J. I. Miller, Roanoke, La., Dec. 31. 

MARYLAND. 

Meadow Branch. — The Sunday school here was ad- 
dressed on the afternoon of Dec. 29 by Prof. E. C. Bixler, 
of Elizabelhtown College, and the writer, after which the 
officers and teachers gave a box of candy to each member 
of the younger classes. Bro. Bixler also preached an ac- 
ceptable sermon in our Westminster church on the even- 
ing of Dec. 30.— W. E. Roop, Westminster, Md., Dec. 30. 

Welsh Run. — Dec. 24 closed our series of meetings, held 
at the Clay Lick meetinghouse by our home ministers, 
Bro. Jacob Keller and Bro. L. E. Elliott. During part of 
I he meetings the weather was very inclement. — John E. 
Kowland, R. D. 19, Clearspring, Md., Dec. 31. 

MICHIGAN. 

Fairview congregation met on Christmas morning for 
worship. A program had been prepared on the life of 
Christ. We had a very interesting meeting, in which many 
of the members took part. We also met in the evening 
and were entertained by our Sunday-school scholars, with 
a very interesting program. A collection of $2.68 was 
taken for the St. Joseph mission, for their New Year's 
dinner for the poor. — C. W. Stutzman, Blissfield, Mich., 
Jan. 1. 

Riverside congregation met in council Dec. 29. Elders 
present were C. L. Wilkins and S. M. Smith. We missed 
the face of our dear elder, Bro. Hawbakcr. Bro. Wilkins 
presided at the council. He and Bro. Smith were here to 
complete some work for which they were called here in 
August. Bro. Wilkins was chosen elder for the coming 
year and the writer correspondent. Bro. Earl Good was 
elected on the Christian Workers' committee. Every three 
months we elect one for nine months. The writer was 
elected superintendent of the Sunday school. The mission 
board has authorized Bro. Wilkins to give us meetings 
once a month. He is to be here the last Saturday in each 
month and remain over Sunday.— Harvey Good, Gait, 
Mich., Jan. 1. 

WQodland church had services on Christmas day by 
Bro. John M. Smith. An- offering of $5.55 was received 
and sent to our state mission secretary. Last Sunday our 
Sunday-school superintendent read a letter from the mis- 
sion at St. Joseph, Mo., desiring aid for their New Year's 
dinner for the poor children. A collection of $5 was sent 
them. Last year our church bore the expense of sending 
one of our ministers to the special Bible term at North 
Manchester. We are arranging to send another of our 
ministers this year. — Anna Christian, Woodland, Mich., 
Jan. 1. 

MISSOURI. 

Essex.— Dec. 20, Bro. C. E. Myers arrived' at Essex, 
Mo., to take charge of the mission work in the southeast- 
ern part of Missouri, belonging to the First District of 
Arkansas. In this field I have labored for twenty years, 
devoting nearly half of my time to the mission work. _ It 
is with regret that we leave the field and the many faith- 
ful members we love so dearly. Here is where the best 
of our life has been spent, and we know and are known by 
many. But we believe the Lord will care for them, and I 
feel that our Bro. Myers will give the field a lifting up 
that we could not. We expect to start for Omaja, Cuba, 
the first part of February, the Lord willing, where we will 
make our home and try to help build up the kingdom 
of our Lord in the far sunny South. I am in Thornton 
& Minor's Institute at St. Louis again, and beg an interest 
in the prayers of the faithful that I may recover from my 
affliction and be used by my Master for the good of others 
in his kingdom as long as I live. — Ira P. Eby, 3639 Olive 
St., St. Louis, Mo., Jan. 1. 

Handley. — Bro. J. B. Hylton came to us Dec. 27 and 
preached five very instructive sermons. There are eight 
members here now Bro. Hylton expressed himself as 
hopeful for the outcome at this mission point, as we have 
a better country and brighter prospects for building up a 
church than he had expected to find. Our Sunday school 
is still moving along with fair attendance. — F. L. Baker, 
R. D. 2, Conway, Mo., Jan. 1. 

Joplin. — We have been here almost a month in the mis- 
sion work, and we find the work a pleasure. We have 
been distributing Gospel - Messengers, and making calls. 
The Sunday-school and preaching services are increasing 
numerically and in interest. We would be pleased to have 
all the Gospel Messengers we can get for distribution. 
Address Brethren Mission, Joplin, Mo., care F. Gochenour, 
211S Bird St.— Mattie Gochenour, Joplin, Mo., Dec 30. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

Perth.— Bro. J. M. Myers came to us Dec. 23 and held 
eight days' meetings. He gave us some very interesting 
i ermons and blackboard illustrations. We are in the 
midst of a singing school conducted by Sister Alice Fun- 
derberg of this place.— M. J. Hoffman, Perth, N. Dak., 
Dec. 31. . . 



, 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 12, 1907. 



29 



NEW MEXICO. 
Pecos Valley church convened in council at Dexter, New 
Mexico, Dec. 29, Eld. C. H. Brown presiding. Eld. G. W. 
Clemens, of Stet, Mo., was with us on this occasion. Thir- 
teen members were received by letter, among whom were 
Brethren Jacob Wyne, an elder, and E. E. Brunk, a min- 
ister in the first degree. Resolutions were passed express- 
ing approval of the move to build a house of worship at 
Lake Arthur, work on which is now going forward. The 
members at Dexter were also authorized to proceed in the 
erection of a house there whenever they see fit to do so. 
Trustees were elected for the Lake Arthur house and steps 
taken to arrange for a series of meetings at Dexter. Sev- 
eral members are here who will soon present their certify 
cates of membership; others have arranged to locate with 
us soon, and we are very much, encouraged. — James M. 
Neff, Lake Arthur, N. M, Dec. 31. 

OHIO. 
Donnels Creek church met in council Dec. 29, with Eld. 
D. Leatherman in charge. Sunday-school officers were 
elected for the coming year. For the country house Bro. 
George W. Barnhart superintendent; New Carlisle, Bro. 
Harry Funderburg superintendent. We decided to have 
the next quarterly council at New Carlisle. Donnels Creek 
church has at present a membership of 293, with five min- 
isters, three of these being elders, with David Leather- 
man presiding elder. We have two churchhouses where 
regular services are held every Sunday, two evergreen 
Sunday schools, and a Christian Workers' meeting. There 
are two isolated points where services are held, one place 
once a month and the other every two weeks. We also 
have a Sisters' Aid Society which meets every week and 
does commendable work. During the past year we have 
held two series of meetings and three love feasts. Have 
lost by letter three and by death four; have received by 
baptism thirty-five (eleven of these were baptized outside 
of a series of meetings), one was restored to fellowship 
and seven received by letter. — Hettie F. Barnhart, R. D. 4, 
Box 95, New Carlisle, Ohio^ Dec. 31. 

Eagle Creek.— Our church met Dec. 30, to hold a Sun- 
day-school meeting. We dispensed with the regular serv- 
ices of the morning, Sunday school and preaching, and 
used the time to discuss live Sunday-school topics. We 
had more than a dozen talks by the workers, and the chil- 
dren gave recitations. Lois Spacht, our district secretary, 
also gave us a speech. This meeting was inspiring. We 
shall have other meetings of this kind in the future. — 
Jesse J. Anglemyer, Williamstown, Ohio, Jan. 3. 

Loudonville.— Bro. Jesse J. Anglemyer came Dec. 6 and 
preached for us until Dec. 16 at the Plum Run churchhouse, 
preaching twelve sermons. One precious soul was re- 
ceived by baptism. — Jennie Roseborough, R. D. 1, Box 
17, Perryville, Ohio, Jan. 2. 

Maumee church met in council Dec. 29, our elder, Christ. 
Krabill, presiding. Bro. David Shong, our correspondent 
for many years, has resigned on account of poor health. 
The writer was chosen to take his place. Bro. Krabill 
stayed with us Saturday night, and Sunday morning was 
called to anoint Sister Underwood. Then he preached a 
soul-cheering sermon. — Katie Rupp, Mark Center, Ohio, 
Jan. 2. 

Mercer.— Bro. D. C. Hendrickson was with us Dec. 23. 
and gave us two soul-cheering sermons. One young man 
was baptized. Church met in council Dec. 29. Our elder, 
D. D. Thomas, presided. He remained with us over Sun- 
day and gave us several soul-cheering sermons. — Katie 
Shellabarger, Mendon, Ohio, Jan. 3. 

Portage church met in council Jan. 1. Eld. J. P. Krabil! 
presided. The church was found to be in love and union. 
Bro. E. R. Cramer came to this place Nov. 10 and preached 
thirteen sermons. We felt much encouraged. Bro. Cra- 
mer would have remained with us longer, but the weather 
became so unfavorable, and the people could not attend 
the services.— Mabel Caskie, Rising Sun, Ohio, Jan. 4. 

South Poplar Ridge.— Bro. G. A. Snider began a series 
oi meetings at this place Dec. 10, and closed Dec. 23. The 
members are very much encouraged. Our brother preached 
sixteen sermons. — S. S. Noffsinger, R. D. 5, Defiance, 
Ohio, Dec. 31. 

Sidney. — The first day of 1907 proved one of rejoicing to 
the Sidney mission. At 2 P. M. three precious souls, — 
one a Sunday-school girl, the other two young married 
women, — -were baptized. Since March, 1905, we have bap- 
tized at Sidney, sixty persons; reclaimed eleven. Out of 
ihis number five have died, and "we granted letters to sev- 
enteen members. Fourteen have gone back into a lost 
world. Our membership at present is eighty-eight. — 
S. Z. Smith, Sidney, Ohio, Jan. 3. 

Salem. — Bro. Reuben Shroyer came to us and preached 
nearly four weeks. The Lord's work among us has been 
revived. Fourteen accepted Christ and two came back 
to the Father's house. Eight were just young married 
people and eight were young people from the Sunday- 
school ranks. We have been much built up. — Katie Flory, 
Union, Ohio, Jan. 4. 

Upper Twin. — Our series of meetings at Sugar Hill, con- 
ducted by Bro. Jesse Stutsman, began Dec. 6 and closed 
Dec. 25. Through all the meetings he received the best 
of attention. — Jacob Nill, Lewisburg, Ohio, Jan. 2. 

OKLAHOMA. 

Monitor.- — -Our Christmas services were well attended, 
after which a collection of $6.66 was taken up in behalf of 
the poor of the St. Joe mission. — Sue Gordon, R. D.'l, 
Nashville, Okla., Jan. 1. 

Reeding. — Bro. Daniel Wolfe began preaching De.c. 9 
and continued until Dec. 18, preaching twelve sermons. 
We feel that much good seed was sown. We are few in 
numbers here and would be glad to have brethren stop 
and see us when passing through this part of Oklahoma, 
and preach for us. We are three miles south of Reeding, 
in a good country; good climate. — Viola Blauton, R. D. 1, 
Cashion, Okla., Jan. 1. 

OREGON. 

Newberg church met in council Dec. 29, our elder, Geo. 
C. Carl, presiding. The officers for the church, Christian 
Workers and Sunday school were elected for the ensuing 
year. Our church is now free from debt, with the as- 
sessment plan for raising money well under way. This 
insures a full treasury and all seem pleased with the out- 
look. We decided to hold a series of meetings at a suit- 
able time before spring, closing with a love feast. Our 



Messenger agent reported the Messenger in each mem- 
bers home for next year except two, and those she had 
not yet seen.— Mrs. Myra Welch, Newberg, Ore., Jan. 1. 

Newberg church held a Thanksgiving service Thanks- 
giving day. After hearing a good sermon by Bro. Archie 
Vandyke, an offering of $7.50 was taken for the Brooklyn 
mission. Sunday evening, Dec. 23, Eld. G. C. Carl gave us 
a good sermon.— Ella Moomaw, Newberg, Ore., Dec. 29. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 
Black Rock.— Our series of meetings opened Dec. 15 and 
closed Dec. 30, conducted by Eld. Hiram Gibble. The 
weather was inclement much of the time. We have bap- 
tized thirteen during the year. Our Sunday school con- 
tinues during the winter and progresses nicely. We have 
purchased a house which has been remodeled and prepared 
for a meetinghouse in the village of Melrose, Md„ which 
will be ready for services in the near future.— E. S. Miller, 
Black Rock, Pa., Dec. 31. 

Codorus church met in council Jan. 1, Eld. D. Y. Bril- 
hart presiding. The Sunday-school officers were elected, 
Bro. S. B. Myers superintendent.— J. L. Myers, R. D. 3, 
Glen Rock. Pa., Jan 3. 

Ephrata church met in council Dec. 10. Our elder, I. 
W. Taylor, not being present on account of the illness of 
his mother, Bro. David Kilhefner presided. We decided 
to have a series of meetings, and the committee to make 
arrangements for it have reported that Bro. Levi Mohler 
has agreed to come March 2. On Christmas forenoon we 
had a very pleasant and inspiring service. The program 
was about Jesus, his birth, boyhood, manhood, and a gen- 
eral talk about Christmas. Our Sunday school is in a 
nourishing condition. The same officers were reelected. 
Bro. Keller conducted preaching services in the German 
language this forenoon and Bro. Kilhefner this evening in 
English.— Mazie Martin, Ephrata, Pa., Dec. 30. 

Hanover church met for council Jan. 2, Eld. D. -H. Baker 
presiding. Officers were elected, Bro. H. S. Baker super- 
intendent. Letters of membership were granted to Eld. 
J. H. Utz and wife. We had two services on Thanksgiving 
day. A collection was taken amounting to $6.35 for dis- 
trict mission and $3.20 for home purposes.— W. B. Har- 
lacher, Hanover, Pa., Jan. 4. 

Harrisburg church met in council Dec. 28 with Eld. 
Jacob Longanecker presiding. We were made to rejoice 
for the restoration of one sister. An election of officers was 
held Dec. 30 for Christian Workers' meeting for the com- 
ing quarter; president, Bro. J. C. Eshelman; vice-president, 
E. S. Bitner. The church decided to hold watch night 
services Dec. 31. The watch night meeting was well at- 
tended, with a missionary spirit. — Sallie E. Schaffner 5. 
N. 13th St, Harrisburg, Pa., Dec. 31. 

Indian Creek church met in council Dec. 29, with R. A. 
Nedrow presiding. A system for raising money for the 
current needs of the church was adopted. We decided to 
hold a series of meetings at the County Line church, to 
begin Feb. 23, to be conducted by the home ministry. 
On Thanksgiving we held services at the above named 
place, at which an offering amounting to $18.51 was lifted 
for home mission work. — R. A. Nedrow, Jones Mills, Pa, 
Jan. 4. 

Jacobs Creek congregation met in council Dec. 29, and 
officers for the year were elected. The death of Bro. U. 
D. Braucher left us without a ruling elder. Eld. J. K. 
Eicher was asked to take his place, which he agreed to 
do. Bro. Braucher had been our elder for almost two 
years. The congregation increased in numbers and 
strength during this time. — Elizabeth Strohm, Mt. Pleas- 
ant, Pa, Jan. 3. 

Lancaster church held its usual Christmas and mission- 
ary service on Christmas evening. We sang Christmas 
carols and had recitations and an essay. The attendance 
was good. The church sent Christmas cheer to thirty- 
nine poor families, in the shape of a very large basket of 
provisions apiece, on Christmas morning. Our series of 
meetings will commence Jan. 12. Bro. Levi S. Mohler 
will do the preaching. — Emma C. E. Landes, 219 College 
Ave, Lancaster, Pa, Dec. 30. 

Lewistown congregation met in council Dec. 29, in the 
Dry Valley church. Our elder, Bro. S. J. Swigart, was 
present. Last March we decided at our council to take 
an offering at our services each Lord's Day, of which one 
offering is taken each month for mission work. We are 
pleased with the result. On Monday of this week six of 
our young people left to attend the Elizabethtown school. 
— Minnie E. Hower, Maitland, Pa, Jan. 3. 

Licking Creek. — The Pleasant Ridge church called Bro. 
W. F. Spidle to preach for us. He came Dec, 15 and 
preached until Dec. 30. Seventeen united with the church, 
eight of whom are heads of families. The youngest one 
baptized was about thirteen years old. On Christmas day 
one dear son was baptized.— Irvin W. Garland, Pleasant 
Ridge, Pa, Dec. 31. 

Lost Creek congregation met in council Jan. 1. Our 
elder, Andrew Bashore, had charge of the meeting. One 
letter was granted and three were received by letter. Two 
of them were a minister and his companion. Bro. J. H. 
Corney was reelected superintendent of the Sunday school 
at Goodwill. Sister Verna Bashore was appointed Mes- 
senger agent. Bro. C. O. Beery will hold a series of meet- 
ings in the Happy Holly schoolhouse, near Mifflintown, 
commencing Jan. 14. This is a mission point. — J. B. Frey, 
R. D. 2, Mifflintown, Pa., Jan. 2. 

Mountville. — Bro. Wm. A. Anthony began a series of 
meetings in the Manor house Dec. 15, and continued until 
Dec. 26, preaching fifteen interesting sermons. The church 
was greatly revived. — A. S. Hottenstein, East Petersburg, 
Pa, Dec. 31. 

New Enterprise church met in special council Dec. 29 
for the purpose of holding a choice for a minister, which 
fell on Bro. Edgar M. Detweiler. Brethren O. V. Long, 
Wm. S. Ritchey and Jacob S. Koontz were called on to 
hold the choice. Bro. Detweiler was installed the same- 
day. — W. H. Mentzer, New Enterprise, Pa, Dec. 31. 

Pittsburg. — Our council met Dec. 20. We had a very 
pleasant meeting. The junior missionary study classes 
are doing good work and are much interested in it. — Mary 
Grabill, 1120 Greenfield Ave, Pittsburg, Pa, Dec. 30. 

Purchase Line.— Last night closed our two weeks' pro- 
tracted effort here. Bro. G. S. Rairigh came to our assist- 
ance after the home ministers had preached four sermons. 
Here was Bro. Rairigh's spiritual birthplace and near here 
he spent his childhood and youthful days. Saints were 



encouraged. For the first time we are having an evergreen 
Sunday school here.-Lizzie Swariz. Purchase Line Pa 
Dec. 31. ' ' 

West Greentree.-We opened a series of meetings Dec 
5. which continued until Jan. 2. Bro. Henry Hollinger 
\\ as with us and preached twenty-two sermons. Nine 
precious souls came out on the Lord's side— S. R Mc- 
Dannel, Elizabethtown, Pa., Jan. 5. 

h J ell °r? C %<y* con g r ega.ti n met in the Bethel church- 
p£« w ' 23 «o reorganize the Sunday school for 1907. 
u-pft'.r V< ? rl WaS r ^ lected superintendent and the 

V.lu r l U an n T ^ C r me ^ tl Ii g was inducted by Eld. John 
Rush.— G. F. Batzel, R. D. 7, Tatesville, Pa, Dec. 30. 

TENNESSEE. 
Concord.— Brethren Jacob Wine and Wm. Williford 
came to our place Dec. 24, commencing meeting next day 
and preaching eleven sermons. We were hungry for the 
bpspe 1. There are a few isolated members down here 
trie church has been torn up about eight years, and we 
live about sixty miles from where the Brethren live who 

m,mitJ .T '? i PrC o Ch , f ° r US ' The P e °P le of olir com- 
munity like the Brethren and their preaching.— Mary 
Jane Tipton, R. D, Concord, Tenn., Jan 3 

Pleasant Valley.-On Thanksgiving day our services 
here were conducted by Eld. C. H. Diehl. Dec. 16 the 
funeral serv.ee of William Brown and the writer's great- 
grandmother, Mrs. Elizabeth Diehl, were conducted bv 
Y i t/'m 0r " ? ssistcd b -v Brethren Daniel Bowman and 
John H.lbert from Job 13: 15. On Christmas day Bro 
Austin Diehl gave us an interesting address.— Erne F. 
Miller, Route 8, Jonesboro, Tenn, Dec. 28. 

VIRGINIA. 
Basic City.— The Brethren of Jerman's Gap, in Barren ' 

Ridge congregation, have decided to build a churchhouse 
on top of Blue Ridge Mountain, in Albemarle county Vir- 
ginia, on the grazing farm owned by Eld. Enoch L Brower 
in his lifetime, where the old Browers used to preach in 
the grove many years ago. The Brower heirs have do- 
nated the land and part of the timber. When the house is 
done they propose calling it Browers, or Enoch Chapel in 
remembrance of the Browers.— S. F. Scrogham, Basic City 
Va, Dec. 31. 

Botetourt.— Bro. S. A. Honbergcr and wife have been 
with us since Nov. 20. He held two series of meetings in 
our congregation. The first was at Pleasant Hill, an iso- 
lated point. He preached every evening for two weeks. 
Three were baptized, and one applicant for baptism. Dec 
18, he began services at the Cave Rock church, and 
preached sixteen sermons. The meeting closed Christmas 
day. One was baptized and three await the rite. We are 
glad to have had Bro. Honbcrger with us.— Sue B Shaver 
iroutville, Va, Dec. 29. 

Greenmount church met Dec. 29 in council. Eld. J. A. 
Garber presided. Four letters were granted. We decided 
to hold three series of meetings during the year, viz. At 
Greenmount, Mt. Zion and Pine Grove. We send one 
delegate to Annual Meeting, Bro. Sidney L. Bowman. 
Delegates to district meeting, Brethren D. R. Miller and 
J. W. Wampler. Officers for Christian Workers' meeting 
J. W. Wampler president, L, Katie Ritchie sc-crelary. 
Sunday-school superintendents, Brethren D. R. and S. M. 
Miller. Church correspondent not changed, A committee 
of three brethren was selected 'to revise church book S M 
Bowman, John R. Kagey and Johns Shirkey.— I... Katie 
Ritchie, Greenmount, Va, Jan. 4. 

Mt. Horeb.— Bro. E. S. Geer came to our place Dec. 15. 
He preached two inspiring sermons. We hope to have 
meeting again during the winter. Our Sunday school will 
close Sunday. The attendance was very good during the 
three quarters. We expect to commence our school again 
in April.— Emma Southall, Cartersville, Va, Dec. 29. 

WASHINGTON. 

Centralia.— We celebrated Christmas day by having 
services at the church. A program was rendered by the 
Sunday school. The primary and intermediate classes 
were given appropriate gifts, books, Testaments, and cards. 
The young people's class brought their offering of $6.35, 
which they give for a church in Seattle. — Anna Myers, 
Centralia, Wash, Dec. 27. 

Spokane. — Our council convened Dec. 1, with Eld. J. 
Harman Stover as moderator. Officers were elected for 
the ensuing year. Sister Elsie M. AschenbrentiL-r was 
chosen Sunday-school superintendent, also president of 
Christian Workers' meeting. It was decided to hold a 
series of meetings as soon as a minister could be secured. 
Bro. John O. Streeter will be with us Jan. 5, to begin meet- 
ings the following day. These meetings will continue indef- 
initely. A love feast will be held in connection with the 
meetings. There are great opportunities in this city to do 
a good mission work if we had more efficient workers. 
Bro. J. G. Miller was with us on Christmas and preached 
in the morning and evening, and in the afternoon we had 
a very interesting program. — G. D. Aschcnbreiincr, S. 109 
G St, Spokane, Wash., Jan. 1. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 
Junior. — The home mission board of the second West 
Virginia District met Dec. 22, and decided that we would 
do more to advance the cause of Christ this year than in 
the year just passed. The board tried hard to get some- 
one to go, but failed. This year we are going to give our 
own district brethren the preference, but if they will not 
go, we are going to try to get brethren from adjoining 
districts. We now have a surplus of $97.04, and this must 
be spent, and more if we can get someone to go. The 
work is much needed in this district.— A. C. Auvil, Sec, 
Junior, W. Va., Jan. 3. 

WISCONSIN. 
Bagley. — I am at the home of Bro. Wm. A. Troyer. 
There are seven members living here and near Glen Haven, 
— five brethren and two sisters. My home is at Platteville, 
Grant county. We made arrangements to have a series ol 
meetings for one week, beginning one week ago last Sun- 
day. We secured the use of the Congregational church. 
five miles southeast of Glen Haven, in which we held 
meetings from Dec. 24 to the evening of Dec. 30. On 
Sunday morning, Dec. 31, we all went to the hall in Glen 
Haven, where we met Bro. 1. R. Young, of Lanark, 111. 
We had with us both Brethren Young and Eisenbise. 
the latter conducting our one week's meeting. On the 
evening of that day we held our love feast, with ten mem- 
bers surrounding the tables.— D. W. Stover, Platteville, 
Wis, Jan. 1. 



I' i 



mm 



30 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER— January 12, 1907. 



" THE BONNET." With love and greetings to all my dear sisters in the ANNUAL SUNDAY-SCHOOL INSTITUTE OF 

..... r , , ; ' . , , fa ' tn (many of whom I hope to meet at the convention NORTHWESTERN OHIO 

[A lady In Los Angeles, whose training In schools and .,„„. ,, , T .. .. . . . AT , ^° * creiM uniu. 

business circles enables her to prepare an Interesting and a Mext Ma >°' ' wo " ld add "" closing, Never, never be sorry 

beautifully typewritten article, wishes to tell the story of you are obliged to wear the wee bonnet. I find it is The meeting was held in Sugar Creek church heffinnino- 

her observations anonymously. It Is rare to grant one this always becoming to a willing wearer. God put something Dec '4 (Monrl-iv evenino-l -,„,! „„ , ,• I i,„-T? 

Privilege. We are sure that what she says will be read eIse in that fa „ [h at is beautiful tint far suroisses all H -*( Monday evening), and continued until Dec. 26. 

with interest, even if she Is unknown to our readers.— Ed.l , s neautitu , mat tar surpasses all Bro. J. G. Royer conducted the meeting. He gave many 

•™ ,• , , ,. ■ worldly adornment and leaves all such far beneath their soul-cheerine qnd IntfmeHv. ,, ir« ti u , j I- 

The little bonnet has caused me to n-.edtate upon ts Hesires T™. l„„„„ I;., „ '.r i ' • . t .. i ,, cneering and instructive talks. Those who heard him 

use, its worth, its testimony, its protection to the wearer, , d "iet sni i v ,el „ 1 c" * 'f "c^ ™ C * ti0 " W " weI1 imprOTed ' f ° r h = P—'ted 

until I feel a deep desire to voice my convictions concern- * *"" S1 " nt ' "'" C " ' S ° f grC " C """' lh °»^ that will make lasting impressions on the minds 

ing it. ""•""■ of some - There were thirty or more Sunday-school teach- 

It seems very far from right to speak of it as a cross. THE HAMPERING OF SIN. ™ Present. We were made sorry that more teachers do 

Being an outsider, I have an opportunity to know how it „, „ ' not attend these meetings. 

is looked upon by the world in general, of the respect and , hen * e children of Isr ael fi '>a'ly reached the " land The day-school teacher feels it his duty to attend the 

love it creates in those who see it. I also find there are , P romlse aft er their long and tiresome journey annual institute, so the Sunday-school teacher ought to 
many who love the doctrines and the lives of those who through the wilderness, they were bidden to be strong. feel it his duty to attend these meetings, for a greater re- 
wear the bonnet and are not willing themselves to sac- '° g0 '" aI,d P osscss the la nd, and d "ve out their enemies. sponsibility rests upon the Sunday-school teacher to direct 
rifice the foolish fashion, or habit, of looking like the But they fa,,cd to obey God fu " y - and Permitted many the little minds to Jesus. 

rest of the world. Ah well! until they are willing, they of " le w,cked heathen to remain. Later the Israelites We hope these meetings will increase in attendance and 

are not ready to don this sacred little witness of a meek compromised with some and intermarried with others. make more efficient Sunday-school workers, 
and humble spirit. I have even heard that some Dunk- T - e acts worked disaster in many ways. The wily . Jennie A. Sellers, 

ards were a little disturbed because of the rule. They heat,,en hM ,he best P ortio " of tI,e ,and in most of the ' os,or,a . °"'°- 

wear the bonnet simply to comply with the laws of the '" bcS ' and many of the ,attcr w "e cramped for room. „,„ nr „„ „ 

church, in order to be members, not because they love Tlle w,ckcd a,,d sensual worship of the land captivated GEORGES CREEK, PA. 

it as the silent little messenger to the world, saying so many of Gt>d ' s choscn """' his wrath was visibly inani- . 

plainly: "In the world, hu, not of it," "Hidden with '<*'ed upon them. Wars and robbery were continually ™f d'c 22 N™ o ' hT, '" *"■ ^j™ 8 " 

Chris, in God," or because they love its sweet reminder ° CCUrr "" g ' *'" keP ' ma " y ' r ° m doi " g "'=" beSt '° r former meetS In, the d f ', WP»™'"1 « a 

of their crucifixion, or that haying been made partakers themselves and families, and who knows but that the ™ ,„.,,' , ■ f COU " C " *"" J"* '"' 
of his death and of his nature and "dead indeed unto sin comln e of the Christ "as greatly delayed by the failure '„, " " 7 ', ?' solictors were at the meet- 

but alive unto God," they must be holy, pure, clean of t0 ° bey God? Sur e ly ' he 'hoscn ones were not the most g ' ™ at "."' h " e made a very good showing. Some 

hear, and life,— all that the little bonnet stands for to ha PP y u " d " ™ h conditions. ™T C * ^'"^ ">'" C ° M " 0t get 

those who see it But how similarly situated arc we to-day. God desires „ ' 

To me, it is very sacred, very sweet, yes, beautiful. us t0 P° SMSS the la " d ' " Tb e meek shall inherit the „ n a e T the Wde'rtir, ^ ^ w^""^" 8 "" ""' ^ 
and I often say: " How careful and prayerful its wearer earlh " " A " thin * s arc V™"-" Y » « are cramped and ™°" "' e 1 '.«k"*>P of Bro. William Townsend, and we 
should be not to disgrace it and thus bring reproach tampered on all sides by sin simply because we do not ° "'"' "f"" P««Per the coming year under the 

upon her profession." try harder to drive the enemy out. Instead we often in- ' 1Qn f " re ,, BrC ' Jose P h G ' Cov er, who was elected 

Having attended the church for a long time 1 have vite him to dwdl with us. We dally with sin until it ,,1 r'l °' \i, T' J mvnsl: '" i was <= iccted President 

been greatly impressed by the beauty of th" faces framed llas us undcr its control and we are too lethargic to , cl,rlst ' an Workers meeting. The Christian Work- 

by the bonnet, and, like many others I often asked why S, ' akc off our fetters ' We feel the great weight of the , " 1L- « m S "as been doing well. Bro. Durr lias been 
the bonnet made the wearer so sweet and lovely Ah I burden . yet we are not willing to make enough exertion " , , m ' nis 'ry. 

have learned; it is the humble spirit of her who thus '° shakc off the lcad ' Bo,h s o-called saint and sinner i "e outlook for the church the coming year in church 

chooses to lay aside the useless, worldly fashion and in are in bonds ' Both '""S tor freedom, and with every w ° rk ,S one f encouragement. 

modest apparel make known to all that she belongs to a assuran ce of mighty power to help, yet we cling to the mo. iSarnthouse held the council and preached for us 

separate and peculiar people. Humble, meek dead to "'' and make but w e al( efforts to free ourselves. °" Saturday evening and Sunday morning at eleven 

the world and pride, and fear of man! peaceful calm S ' n is P rese nt with us . in so many forms. It is not ° C Alpheus Debolt. 

loving and beloved, obedient to the command to come out enough ts act only on the defensive side. There is an - l '""' ary ]_ 

and be separate. Is it a wonderful result that both face a S8 r essive side the active worker must take. Methinks ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^r^ 
and bonnet become glorified, almost saintly in some som etimes that, proud of our temperance record as we as «-fV- Fl N ANCI AL • REPORTS -W-. 

cases? Others look like a psalm of praise; again there H church are ' we are only defenders. But little aggressive ■ ....... 

are faces that seem like a prayer; again and again have I WOrk '" th ' S U " e is done by us - We may save our own ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

looked through tear-dimmed eyes upon such faces that P rcc ious ones, but how about others? Are we sure of 

seemed to stir my inmost soul with wonder and awe eVe " savin g °ur own when we do so little towards re- Th . ,,„„„„, „, , 

Very rarely have I seen a face inside 7 a boime, "a, ™* in « th = Sal <>™ ? ?B£°^f°™™"' SSSS VFSS-JSSFSFR 

wore either frown or anxiety. I will never forget how it Sunday desecration and amusement are looked upon as See that the amount appears properly herewith In ease It 

impressed me, grieved me, because of its contradiction ev,ls - but cannot-be-helped ones. Rarely do we go far ^IVm ssi™ Vn'ls^r e «"-','-"""">««- ,„ 
to the other faces upon which the Master's hand had "T^ T" '° Speak 0Ur di = a PPr°val. Athletics in our '"the name of Gene.ilVilslonluy* at?" T^rart 'committed 
written: "Keep in perfect peace." colleges far surpassing the approval of those who are B ' WOBID-WIDE rtJHD 

The bonnet, then, is a protection, a constant reminder co,, " rn,:d ior th e welfare of Zion's people are tolerated «u..<rarl-*ia5.55._ N orthern District, Individual Mahaly 

of what the wearer professes, a rebuke to a wrong act ' sadness ' even though each season enrolls num- i II S , ™! r?I ,"VJ,"-y,-n ... .» lis Jo 

yes, even though,. Some may say: " if , his 3 be- "=" °' d " d ^ '"">" d °^ SMSJ'ffl&g^SISSU" 4^£NfcES? ' Carthag? 

lieves so in the bonnet, why does she not wear one her- y ° evlls are encroaching upon us and hamper- 'dm. ",.,«'"„";,""; ° 5 ' 

self?" Well, listen! The swee, sermons Te read L '"^ "- work of the Master. What are we going to do ^S^ST^S^SSP CrST'l^ SgSTSXt 
some faces have caused me to long to go and do like- IT* 7 "* ^^ °"< '^edom? Let us have the result * ndlwduais/ ' J.' X Trackier/ MeComV ' si-' Sarah ' B JA& 
wise, and that is what I intend to do ycur meditations and conclusions. Scipio siding. S3; J. E Roharts, si . 7. .. ...'. g 7 jo 

Sisters, you who wear the bonnet', be grateful for the ^^urg, Cal. F , ora E . Teague InlSn'."^ f^&^^K&Z^flgPSS™ %£ 

privilege, for its sweet protection and the spirit of hu- — f^tii^&S^iSi&S^i: ' Woost^r ' ' f? Sg 

toh ta'thTurd Jests' U " " SaCred WitnCSS ° f y ° Ur SUNDAY -SCHOOL NORMAL OF NORTHWESTERN ^—^ ZaSliS'. ti: ^S^STS^^^Z 
Sisters outside the church, who would like to join but ^^ aStcfaV™^?'*"™ ' S '=t'riet,- ' Congregation'. Wad? 

see no use in this change of dress, never look upon it Monday morning, Dec. 24, found many busy people in ^diia^kos? 'VSiniiil Oreion' ' ii- ' W ' ti ' '^^^ 

as a cross but a protection, a sweet shelter that will hide Northwestern Ohio and, if you had asked the reason you OhteaK"?.'. fggfkX-Z* ,/' °€ ,s ' ; '-»".-• eSweSme?: 
you away from the world, relieve you of all the worry would have been rold that it was ail because of the Sun- ^»™-i«5.5^ 'riistrlei' Meeting 

il/sT '"'I' " Ch year ' S faShi ° n a " d " ,C day - Sch ° o1 n0rmal ( b e held the following two days at Indlv'ffjalaV ' x' 'mV Frani,.' Conw'ay' SprlnVs ' ' S Y ' EdwaS 

difficulty of hnding a modest, neat head covering. From the Sugar Creek church, near Lima. The results were vis- F ^&2aSS?' T M"J ri ?*?, fS*^ ^ ""'" ' ■■ ■'• "™ 
a common-sense view, the bonne, is neat, economical. <"= the next morning, for when the time fur open!,,, ar- j£ f SS "Ml, ^ B » V . s f Sry T B .^oSsrfo^.^ 

WmL r" I," d adm ' ,S " ,at ' M ° r *°™' h is riVed a g °° dly nUmb " " ad arriy = d . a " d before , he i oon Nor& iakoS^^O^CongVogail'o'n ' ' Snyder Lake jlIS 

becoming to a willing wearer, who is happy in it. hour most of the seats were occupied The air outside MI «*^ L?""-r Shattl, Denbigh Marrlfg 1 ?' Nolle? 

1 send out this mtssagc ,;r:ying God will bless it to was keen and frosty, but that seemed enly t: bring jut P~mwlvanja-Jl9.EO.-Westa.-n Eistriei, Individual ujy 

out of the dear church fellowship because of the bon- brotherly love within. Daughter, Mahaftey. si; Solomon Striwse" Me Ol| a tlrvS"e 

net. I know the Holy Spirit will carry it home to some The balloting in the organization placed Bro G A &SS2 7 «i^^ II 7rrV. ?'• J - H °—"»e- P»n r| 

S tztt^-zttr wm be - ^^:^z niLfacce^r^ thc — fi?- ^- y ~ -.^^; h ^ « 

.... Urr. T r D acceptaDiy. Southern District. Individuals. Mrs. J. M Zuc" Chambers 

c„ , , * * Bro - J- G - R °yer was again w th us in the capacity of bU m B ' sl - S aT!Lh i-runkleton, Qreencaatie, s" ■> oo 

. ll W "" S \T f SSCd SmCC Wri ' ing ""= aboy c a.i.l instructor, and he was certainly the ight m a f , the s3 T ""^ 2 " -^'«=»ga.,o„, SaglnaV, 'iiMd; ' No » ™ 

I w, h now to add a few words from the standpoint of a right place. Bro. Royer's work occupied most o" the oro irSSffiiiii, Br S t,,e ' r '7 "° ca ™ : ' ' '■ '■'■'•'■'■ '■■'■ ■'■'■■ '■ " " 

Dunkard. I though, I knew about all there was to know gram, varied occasionally, however by the product on of "Wa"^-' *« C °» a ^ p rayer Meet? 

vious rr , i. g .' se P ara, '°n beyond my pre- feast of good things for everyone present and the only ? "iT"™"- 62 cents; M. c. Copp and Wife .^orer'town 

tion a rei f 7' ^'V' " ""^ °' re " and ^ iM '^- "*'« ™™^* was that there were not more of our gij< bVaWot ' cVngregatiVn. ' 'Antioch;- \ \ \ WW " \ ' 1 SI 

'''"" ,r ° m tbe deraa " ds of the world's fashion. superintendents and teachers present to profit by the les i7.°"' l ° m ."^ 1 . 1 :? - ConSreB "" , ' ,s ' d — - »"»i H{yfe= 

I love t, and never for one moment have I felt the leas- sons given. o prom by the les- jnilrMuji - "h.- tt Hitter,- breWeVnt, ":::::: WW W ' loo 

discomfort or regret. r» t t - L . „ Maryland— S9.00.— YV, stern Disti iet. Congregation' MaDle 

No one has bee^i unkind, but, on the contrary, f find i, and"^ ,h t^ZJZ Z^LTT" ^P™ ' --- ' tniividuah' ' ' .ohn ' ' XV ^ierrli,, B 

STaSSr- fLzrt ::tr r °r f T an - ycars ie i T n r meJ " ^"^^^ S^:::»^::?*^::::«-:"i"-^"-4B 

bear .,i™« - a -, , privilege thus to was small, but last year a decided growth was aonirent „"""»»>— S9.oo.-Nortl,er„ District individuals'." Rachel 

n o7„er onT sh'o ZT I """^ ^ "' " hat ma '" *"' ^ y ™ ™ alm " St ^"al to the two pre' eding ones r7aTe Ve fi„ 1 ie r L"s. ,,e s , i 1 : ?! W '. ."'. K .'.^>">™- ""th Bend. |a| 

ner ot person I should be, who profess to be a follower together. V S ° nes M'lfUe District. Individual. A Brother,' ' Wabash, I So 

of the meek and low y Jesus The little ,,„.„ „„ - M„„ ,1 I , Southern District, Individual. A member of Buck Creek 

S^K&^Ht-r ^*™^C«z^v^:^ ^^^::^H:^?e::^ <H 

tact and patience P *" '" wis-iom, for their important duties. Edward Kintner Sec der?""""'" Dlstr " !t ' '"^'VO-al- Mary A. Teager, Merl- 

Lalty, Ohio, Dec. 31. „, M1 4 ale District, individual.' ' 'Mri! ' Louisa LaWrence, Iowa 

ulcy 100 






THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 12, 1907. 



31 



Washington — 86.00.- — Congregation. Tekoa 6 00 

Nebraska — §5.55. — Mr. Jonathan Souders. Cook, $1; D. G. 
Couser, Lincoln, Marriage Notice, 50 cents; C. J. Travis and 
Wife, Chase, S3. 05; J. L. Snavely, Alvo. Marriage Notice, BO 
cents; Wilbert Horner, Carlisle, Marriage Notice, 50 
cents 5 55 

Mienieran — 55.16 — Individual. Allen A. Munson, Cas- 
sapolis 6 16 

Tennessee — S4.00. — Individuals. Missarv Sprancrle. Morris- 
town, $2; MapRie Sattcrflt-ld, Dandrldge, Jl; Mollle Satter- 
fleld, Dand ridge, Jl, 4 00 

Idaho — $2.00. — Individuals. E. C. Frlebly. Blackfoot, II: 
J. S. Brower. Nampa, $1 2 00 

Alabama — 51.20. — Individual. W. B, Woodard, Fruit- 
dale i ao 

Montana — §1.00. — Individual. Rachel Grove, 1 00 

Wisconsin— $1.00.— Individual. Winnie Sandmlre, Aah 
Ridge 1 00 

California — 50 cents. — D. R. Holainger, Laton, Marriage 
Notice 60 

Unclassified — $1.00. 

Total for November $ 469 80 

Previously reported 3269 67 

Total for the year so far, $3739 47 

BULSAR MEETINGHOUSE. 

niinois — $75.00. — Northern District, Sunday School, El- 
gin 50 00 

Individual. A Sister. Sterling 25 00 

Pennsylvania — $71.40. — Eastern District, Congregations. 
White Oak, $41.25; Conesto^a. $30.15 7140 

Iowa, — $9.71. — Middle District, Sunday School. Panther 
Creek 9 71 

South Dakota, — $5.00.— Sisters' Aid Society of Willow Creek 
church . 5 00 

Total for November $ 161 11 

Previously reported 810 73 

Total for the year so far, $ 971 84 

INDIA ORPHANAGE 

Kansas — $32.25. — Southeastern District, Congregation. 
Paint Creek 17 25 

Southwestern District, Individual. Margaret Dudte, Mc- 
Pherson 15 00 

California — $18.00. — Individuals. Clara Blocher, Los An- 
geles. S16; F. C. Myers. Covina, $2 18 00 

Virginia — $23.11. — Second District, Congregation. Glade, 
16 00 

Sunday School. Barren Ridge, 7 11 

Illinois — $5.00.— Northern District, Individual. A Sister for 
Somolo, 4 00 

Southern District, Individual. Mary Hester, Cerro- 
gordo 1 00 

Michigan — $4.00.— Sisters' Aid Society of Woodland 
church 4 00 

Total for November, $ 82 36 

Previously reported, 2111 38 

Total for the year so far $2193 74 

INDIA MISSION. 

Idaho — $34.90. — Congregation. Payette 34 90 

Pennsylvania — $9.26. — Southern District, Sunday Schools. 
Three Spring, $G.66; Fanners Grove Union, $2.60, .. 9 26 

Kansas — $5.00. — Southeastern District. Individual. Lee 
Bucklew, Paola 5 00 

Ohio— -?4.35.— Northeastern District, Congregation Chip- 
pewa, 4 35 

Illinois— $4.00.— Northern District, Individual. Ida M. Kess- 
ler, Mulberry Grove, 3 00 

Southern District, Individual. Mary A. Brubaker, Vir- 
den '. 1 00 

North Carolina — $1.00 — Individual. A. B. Coker, Prince- 
ton 1 00 

Colorado — $1.00.— Individual. H. Baker, Ordway, 1 00 

West Virginia — $1.00. — Individual. Miss Vira Van Meter, 
Elkins 1 00 

Total for November 9 60 51 

Previously reported 431 12 

Total for the year so far, . . '. 9 491 63 

BROOKLYN MEETING-HOUSE. 
Pennsylvania — $29.45. — Western District, Individuals. John 
B. Miller, New Paris, $G; Mary KInzey. New Paris, $6.- 

45 11 45 

Eastern District, Congregation. White Oak 1 50 

Sunday School. Indian Creek 10 00 

Individual. D. C. Reber, Ellzabethtown 150 

Middle District. Christian Workers of Fairview 

church 5 00 

Missouri— $8.00.— Northern District, Individual. Wm. Scar- 
borough, Watson 8 00 

Ohio — $5.00.— Southern District, Individuals. Earl C. Neff. 
Dayton, $1; A. Leah, Mt. Repose, $1; Sidney A. Pfoutz, Trot- 
wood, $2 4 00 

Northeastern District, Individual. Geo. A. Turner, Coshoc- 
ton ; l oo 

Iowa, — $5.00. — Northern District, Individuals. Will and Joe 
Robison, Waterloo 5 00 

Illinois — $4,34. — Northern District. Elgin Christian Work- 
ers 4 34 

Florida— $2.50.— Individual. W. H. Main, Archer, 2 50 

Indiana — $2.00.— Northern District. Individuals. Mrs. S. S. 
Cripe, Goshen, $1; Edyth B. Crlpe, Goshen, $1 3 00 

New Jersey — -$3.00.— Individual. Richard Seidel, Fort Han- 
cock 2 00 

North Carolina — $1.00. — Individual. A. B. Coker, Seven 
Springs 1 00 

Unclassified — $1.00. 

Total for November, 9 60 29 

Previously reported, 452 14 

Total for the year so far $ 512 43 

INDIA HOSPITAL. 

Oregon — $8.80.— Ashland Christian Workers 7 70 

Individuals. Bruce Lininger, Ashland, 60 cents; Fay Carl. 

Ashland, 50 cents 1 10 

Pennsylvania — $6.00.— Southern District, Individual. May 

Oiler Wertz, Waynesboro 6 00 

Michigan— $4.25. — Sunday School. W. Thornapple, 4 25 

Kansas — $1.00.— Individual. Mrs. M. A. Thomas, Tes- 

cott 1 00 

Total for November S 20 05 

Previously reported 329 81 

Total for the year so far 5 349 88 

PALESTINE MEETINGHOUSE. 
Nebraska— $9.71. — Sunday School. " Bethel 9 71 

Total for November, 9 9 71 

Previously reported, 38 18 

Total for the year so far, 9 47 89 

CHINA MISSION. 

Iowa — $1.50.— Northern District, Individual. A Sister, 
Pocahontas 1 50 

Total for November 9 1 60 

Previously reported 75 07 

Total for the year so far 9 7fl 67 

BROOKLYN CHUBCHHOUSE FUND POB NOVEMBER, 

1906. 

Colorado. — Jas. Wlddowson. $2.50. 

Indiana. — Mrs. David Miller, J2; Mary Gates, (2; Union 
City Sisters" Aid, $5; Thomas Cripe, $5; Elmlra Shoemaker, 
$2; Mrs. C. K. Zumbrum, $1. 

Illinois. — A. P. Wine, (2; Delilah Wilson, $2. 

Iowa. — Mrs. Geo. B. Royer, $2; W. H. Royer, (2; Mary S. 
Newscom, J5. 

India. — C. H. Brubaker (Missionary), J5. 

Kansas. — Mrs. Clara F. Brandt, Paul, Cora, Daniel, and 
W. E.. $5. 

Missouri.— L. P. and R. Donaldson. J5. 

Michigan. — East Thornapple Sunday School, (4.35. 

Nebraska. — Josiah S. Gable. $3. 

New York. — Mr. and Mrs. Webb, $5. 



L. E. and Sarah Kauff- 

Pennsylvania:— Eilie"j"stine, SI; Katie Wright, SI; Angus 
Bradford $L', Elder Ren Hottel, SI. Huntingdon Sisters, '(5; 
Lettie Neff. S3; D. H. Miller, SJ; Elizabeth Danrier. Jl; J. S 
Dewalt. 50 cents; West End Mission, ilai rlsbm g. J2; Harrls- 
burg hlster. 1,0 cents: Huntsdale onVring. Jj.T,-.; in His Name, 
lalnjyra. $y; Mabel Waters, Jl: Meycrsdale Mission Circle. 
S50; Otho D. Martin and Wife, $2; Jan,- S.-nft. 55, Essh- 
Sterner. $:,. H. H. Claybaupb. =,:, IT,,Nin^r *,md.iv S.-tevd 
S5; Anna L. Landes, $1; Individual. Martlnsbmg. jl; Abra- 
ham Steele, S5. 

Virginia — Mrs. Wm. H. Long, $2; J. D. Hoffman and Wife, 

Total for November. S1S0.50. 

Correction — Edwin F. Garman, Ohio, $2; Edwin C. Garman 
Ohio, 2;. cents; Jacob Holllnger and Wife, North Manchester 
Ind., S3. This should have appeared in the October number, 

Yo f l !, r „ s , '., n , hl ? T1A "V e - , J - Kurlz Miller. 

5901 3rd Ave.. Brooklyn, N. T. 



MA TRIMONIAL 


" What therefore God has jo 


ned together, let not man pi 


t asunder." 


Mnirtago notices sho 


uld bo nccoiap&nlod by 50 cun 





Branner-Crist.— At the home of Eld. Jno. P. Zigler, 
Nov. 14, 1906, Bro. Casper H. Branner and Sister Mary 
Elizabeth Crist, both of Timbcrville, Rockingham county, 
Va. B. F. Crist. 

Buffenmyre-Taylor.— At the home of the bride, near 
Voganville, Pa., Dee. 25, 1906, by the undersigned, Bro. 
Horace Buffenmyre and Sister Mary S. Taylor, both of 
Earl township, Lancaster county, Pa. 

Samuel W. Taylor. 

Curtis-Rhoads.— At the home of the bride's pcrents, 
Everett W. Curtis and Elsie M. Rhoads, both of Mc- 
Pherson, Kans., by the undersigned. S. J. Miller. 

Dorman-Yeatter.— Dec. 25. 1906, by the undersigned at 
the home of J. H. Steinbarger, Dry Valley, Pa., C. Bruce 
Dorman and Vinie Yeatter, both of Mifflin county, Penn- 
sylvania. H. A. Spanogle. 

Richard-Ed mi ston.— Nov. 29, 1906, at the home of and 
by the writer, at Lewistown, Pa., Clarence J. Richard and 
Charlotte E. Edmiston, both of Maitland, Pa. 

H. A. Spanogle. 

Shuss-Hildebrand.— At the home of the bride's parents, 
Brother and Sister J. Hildebrand, two and one-half miles 
north of Dubois, Nebr., Dec. 25, 1906, Mr. John F. Shuss, 
of Winchester, Idaho, and Elizabeth B. Hildebrand, A. W. 
Neville officiating. Thos. I. Hildebrand. 



FALLEN ASLEEP 



■: the dead which die in the Djrd. 



Death notices of ohJIdron under Ave years not published. 

Ball, Jesse, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Ball, died at 
Middletown, Ind., Dec. 24, 1906, aged 8 years and 10 days. 
He died of membraneous croup. He leaves father, mother, 
four brothers, two half brothers and two half sisters. In- 
terment in the Miller cemetery. Florida J, E. Green. 

Bostetter, Sister Bettie, wife of Bro. Albert Bostetter, 
died of B right's disease in Broad fording congregation, 
Washington Co., Md., Dec. 23, 1906, aged 41 years, 6 
months and 5 days. She leaves an aged mother, a hus- 
band, three children and two brothers. She has for many 
years been a consistent member of the Brethren church. 
Funeral services and interment at Broadfording by Breth- 
ren Harvey Martin and F. J. Ncibert, from Job 30: 23. 

Barbara Martin Showalter. 

Bowman, Sister Dora Alice, died Dec. 18, 1906. aged 39 
years, 2 months and IS days. She died very suddenly of 
paralysis. She was a member of the Pleasant View con- 
gregation; lived near Russelville, Ray Co., Mo. Services 
by the Brethren. Interment in the Wacanda cemetery. 

John H. Mason. 

Bowser, John, died Dec. 16, 1906, at his home, Stillwater 
Junction, Ohio, aged 50 years, 7 months and 21 days. He 
leaves mother, one brother and two sisters. Funeral serv- 
ices by Eld. J. W. Beeghly, assisted by the brethren. 

Josiah Eby. 

Calvert, Walter, son of W. Q. and S. E. Calvert, died of 
B right's disease, at his brother's home near Ingle wood, 
Cai., Nov. 18, 1906, aged 14 years, 7 months and 24 days. 
He became a member of the Brethren church May 20, 
1905. Though young lie took a warm interest in all the 
services of God's house. His father, mother, four brothers 
and four sisters yet remain. Funeral services by Eld, 
Wm. Thomas, from Rev. 21 : 4. W. Q. Calvert. 

Domer, Sister Elizabeth, of Sugar Creek, Ohio, died Dec. 
12, 1906, aged 63 years, 10 months and 19 days. She was 
the oldest of the six children of George and Sarah Domer, 
two children having died in infancy. Her father and 
mother preceded her to the home beyond. One brother 
and two sisters survive her. She united with the Breth- 
ren church about forty-seven years ago, and lived a con- 
sistent Christian life. Funeral services by Bro. S. J. 
Berger and the writer. Edward Shepfer. 

Dove, Bro. Aaron, born in Virginia died Dec. 17, 1906, 
aged 79 years, 11 months and 27 days. He lived near Stct, 
in the Pleasant View congregation, Mo. Services by the 
Brethren. Interment in Wacanda cemetery. 

John H. Mason. 

Eby, Sister Laura R., died at her home near Eldorado, 
Ohio, Dec. 13, 1906, aged 52 years, 3 months and 19 days. 
She was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, and was 
united in marriage to Henry Eby Nov. 28, 1876. To this 
union were born four children. One preceded her to the 
spirit world. Since 1881 Sister Laura was a faithful mem- 
ber of the Brethren church. After having short funeral 
services at the house by the home brethren she was taken 
to her father's home near Trotwood. Bro. J. C. Bright 
conducted the funeral services at Bear Creek, Montgom- 
ery county. Interment near by. Herschel Weaver. 

Flickinger, Christian, born in Mahoning county. Ohio, 
died in the Sugar Creek congregation, Whitley Co., Ind., 
Dec. 8, 1906, aged 75 years, 2 months and 21 days. He was 
married to Miranda Flaugher, in 1854. For forty-three 
years he was a member of the Brethren church. In 1863 
he moved to Huntington county, Indiana. He leaves a 
wife and four children. Funeral services by the writer, 
assisted by Jacob Ahner and S. Z. Smith. 

Dorsey Hodgden. 



Flory Margaret J., died at her. home near Augustine, 
W. Va June 25. 1900. after four days of intense suffering 
aged S6 years, 6 months and 10 days. Mother was born 
in Augusta county, Virginia; was married to Jonathan 
c ,? r V, n o.o • He r, ,u:mk ' n name was Ochcltree. In the 
tall ot IMS they, with three children, emigrated to llamp 
shire county West Virginia, where they lived together until 
lyui), when he was called to his home beyond. She was 
a member of the Brethren church for thirty years She 
leaves two sons and two daughters. Services by Brethren 
p. B. and A. W Arnold. Interment at the Augusta bury- 
ing ground.- Maggie E. Flory. 

Greenawalt, Simon Calvin, of Bedford county near 
Tatesville, Pa., died Dec. 24, 1906, in the hospital in Chi- 
cago, aged 26 years, 2 months and 20 days, lie was 
brought to his home on Ha- 26th. This is the first death 
in the family. He leaves father, mother, six brothers and 
five sisters. He was laid lo rest in the Bethel cemetery 
buneral services by Eld, Wm. Ritchev, assisted by Eld 
D. A. Stayer, from Heb. 9: 27. G. S. Balzel. 

Halterman, Bro. Cyrus, died Dec. 27, 1906, in the Beaver 
Creek congregation. Rockingham Co., Va., aged 75 years 
10 months and 20 days. He with his family moved from 

endlcton county. West Virginia, a number of years ago 
He is survived by his wife and nine children. Burial at 
Beaver Creek. Funeral service conducted by Eld. A S 
Thomas, from Eccl. S: 8. Nannie J. Miller. 

Kline, Sister Leah, died of heart failure at the home of 
her daughter, Mrs. Harder, in Gaylord, Kans., Dec. 16, 
1906 aged 65 years. She had been a faithful member of 
the Brethren church for many years. Her husband pre- 
ceded her about five months ago. She came a short lime 
ago to make her home with her daughter. Funeral serv- 
ices at the M. E. church in Gaylord, from which the re- 
mains were taken to her home in Kingman.cotiniy. Kansas, 
for interment. Services by the writer. I. S. Lercw. 

Manges, Bro. Oty, died near Hooversville. Pa., Dec. 19, 
1906, aged 22 years and 16 days. He was almost instantly 
killed by falling iron in the Cambria Iron Works. Funeral 
services by the writer and Wm. Fry, in the Shade Creek 
cnuxch, p, j. Blough. 

Miller, David H., died at his home, 1000 N. Lawrence 
Ave.. Wichita, Kans., Oct. 8, 1906, aged Ml years, 1 month 
and 9 days. He was born in Washington couuly, Mary- 
land. He was married to Susan Winters, of CI earsp rings, 
Md., Nov. I, 1855. They emigrated to Kansas in 1869, 
came to Wichita in 1871, and have lived at his laic resi- 
dence most or all of the time since. He leaves a wile .md 
four children. He was a great sufferer for several years. 
Funeral services by Eld. John Wise and Jacob Funk" 

Susie Jacques. 

Miller, Susannah, nee McMillan, died at the home of 
her brother, Joel McMillan, in Leeton, Mo., Dec. 23, 1906, 
of tuberculosis, aged 47 years, 4 months and 21 days. Her 
husband, Joseph Miller, died several years ago in Allen 
county, Ohio, the county in which the sister was born. A 
little son survives the parents. Services conducted by 
Elds. E. E. John and J. M. Mohler. Lulu C. Mahler, 

Penrod, Henry C, of Bedford county, near Tatcsville, 
Pa., died Dec. 24, 1906, very suddenly, silting on a chair 
reading, aged 64 years, He was a member of the Pro- 
gressive church. He leaves a wife, three daughters and 
two sons. His remains were laid to resl in the Bethel 
cemetery. Funeral by Eld. D. A. Stayer, assisted by Eld 
Wm. Ritchey, from Amos 4: 12. G, S. Batzel. 

Shook, Sister Catherine, died Dec. 14, 1906, at IK.'' I.i i 
Cantrel St., Decatur, III., aged 83 years, 9 months and 9 
days. She was born in Pennsylvania. Five daughters and 
one son survive her. She united with the Brethren church 
at the age of sixteen. She had been in feeble health for 
some years; for several months she has been dislrcssedly 
afflicted with cancer which was the final cause of her death, 
Funeral services by the writer, assisted by Eld S. S. 
Miller. Text, Job 14: 14. S. W. Garber. 

Showalter, Rolston H., died at his home near Miuton, 
Va., of typhoid fever, Dec. 22, 1906, aged 16 ye:irs, 8 
months and 11 days. He was a sou of Bro. Samuel Sho- 
walter. Services were conducted by Lid. Emanuel Long, 
at Mt. Horcb church. Text, Matt. 24: 42-44. 

S. 1. Bowman. 

Slifer, Sister Marllia J., died at her home in Mt. Morris. 
III., Nov. 4, 1906, aged 59 years, I month and 3 days. Sis- 
ter Slifer was one among our faithful members, a real 
mother in Israel. In her death the church loses a faithful, 
consistent member, her husband a kind-hearted, loving 
wife, and her children a good, Christian mother, whose 
place in their hearts can never be filled. Funeral services 
by the Brethren. D. L. M. 

Thomas, Sister Cora Bell, nee Harris, born in Bote- 
tourt county, Virginia, died Dec. 23, 1906, aged 46 years 
and 11 months. She with her parents, Mrs. and Mis. Eli- 
jah Harris, came to Montgomery county, Indiana, in 1865, 
She was married to Deck Thomas, Feb. 24, 1884. To this 
union two children were born. She united with the Breth- 
ren church Feb. 6, 1886, and lived a consistent Christian 
life. She was afflicted for years. She was anointed a few 
weeks before her death. She leaves a husband, one son. 
a daughter, three full sisters, four full brothers, one half 
sister and one half brother. Services were conducted by 
Eld. Wm. R. Harsh barger, at the Bethel church, near 
Ladoga, Ind. Interment in the Bethel cemetery. 

Theodosia Harris. 

Smith, Bro. Wm., died of heart dropsy, in the Middle 
Creek congregation, Somerset county, Pa., Dec. 28, 1906, 
aged 54 years, 9 months and 12 days. He united with the 
church about a year ago. He leaves a wife. Funeral 
services by the writer, assisted bv Mr. Geis, of the Chris- 
tian church. Text, 1 Thess. 4: 14. H. A. Stahl. 

Tuttle, Bro. James W. D., died at his home in Hunting- 
ton, Ind., Dec. 28. 1906, aged 62 years, 8 m.mths and 24 
days. The immediate cause of Bro. Tuttle's death was 
blood poison, resulting from a sore received in an accident 
several years ago. He had been a consistent member of 
the Brethren church over twenty years. A wife, one son 
and two daughters survive. Funeral services conducted 
by Eld. J. H. Wright, from Num. 23: 10. 

R, W. Bolinger. 

Winter, Simon, died at his home near Wooster, Ohio, 
Oct. 10, 1906, aged 86 years, 3 months and 23 days. He- 
was a faithful member of the Brethren church from young 
manhood. His wife preceded him one year ago last May. 

J. C. Winter. 



i i 



mm 



32 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January IS, 1907. 



Will There Be a 



Go to California 

j" fcU AL 1 KAlnl j ( T « *■ Annual Meeting) 

Butte Valley, California In May===Bllt 



FOR BRETHREN WHO INTEND MOVING 

TEEIE FAinLIES. HOUSEHOLD 

GOODS, LIVE STOCK AND FA£M 

npraaatEtraa nest biarch? 

-A. number of people who intend to move to 
Butte Valley in the Spring have asked the 
above question. We have had to tell them it 
was too early to answer it until we could 
hear from all who intend to move in the 
spring; as to the number of people there 
would be in their party anO number of ears 
of household goods they would have and 
where they expected to start from, so we can 
try and arrange to consolidate these parties 
into a special train. 



are thinking of moving- to Butte Valley in the 
spring, giving above information so we can 
arrange to run the train through as the Breth- 
ren moved from Belleville. Kansas, to Cali- 
fornia three years ago, when they had daily 
preaching and song service. 

All Brethren who are thinking of making 
this move would do well to make their ar- 
rangements so as to get into Butte Valley 
as early in March as possible that they may 
get settled down and their crops ready, so as 
to be ready to participate In entertaining the 

SPECIAL TBAIN TO ANNUAL MEETING 
THAT WILL STOP AT BUTTE 

VALLEY, 

Arrangements are being made for a special 
train to leave Chicago about May 1st en route 
to the Anuuai Meeting, which will enable the 
Brethren to visit Sterling. Denver, Colorado 
Springs, The Garden of the Gods, Pike's Peak, 
The Royal Gorge. Frnita and Junction City in 
Colorado; Salt Lake City, Utah; Nam pa, Pay- 
ette and Yteiser, Idaho; Portland, Oregon, and 
arrive at Butte Valley, California, in time to 
attend the dedication of the new Dunker 
Church at that place and from there go to 
Sacramento and San Francisco, arriving at 
Los Angeles, Saturday, May lSth. 

As the Annual Meeting commences on Tues- 
day, May 21st, this will enable many people 
to visit their friends and relatives en route 
and be at Los Angeles in time to rest up for 
the Annual Meeting. 

There will be regular daily song and praise 
services on both these special trains. Write 
for particulars of both special trains to 

GEO. L. McDONAUGH, 

Colonization Agent, Union Pacliic R. R. Co.. 
OMAHA. NEBRASKA 



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trip over the beautiful Cascade Moun- 
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The Gospel Messenger 






"SET FOR THE DEFENSE OF THE GOSPEL. - '' /X.-7 



Vol. 46. 



Elgin, III., January 19, 1907. 



■'*/'/* 

^/v;// 



No. 3. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 
Editorial, — 

How Great Things the Lord Has Done for Us, 41 

In Dreamland 41 

Opposing the Sunday School, 42 

Home and Foreign Missions, 42 

Supporting the Interests of the Church, 42 

A Religious Conflict, 42 

The Sunday-school Army, 42 

Essays, — 

Why the Difference Between John and the Synop- 
tics. By Wm. M. Howe, 34 

Return of the Jews. By Noah Longanecker, 34 

The Lord's Day. By Chas. M. Yearout, 34 

Eternal Life. By John E. Mohler, 35 

A Group of Effective Ordinances. By John C. John- 

, son, 35 

'1 he Septnagint. By-Nathan Martin '....36 

What the Signs Would Show. By Frank P. John, .36 

Spiritual Life. By I. J. Rosenberger, 36 

Is Science a Substitute for Religion? By W. I. T. 
Hoover, 37 

The Round Table, — 

Anniversary of the Church. By Levi Andes, ......38 

Suggestions to Ministers. Selected by Ezra Flory,.38 
How to Kill Sunday-school Interest. By W. E. ■ 

Roop, 38 

In the Shadow of the Scaffold., By Wm. K. Conner, 38 

I Favor the Suggestion. By John R. Snyder, 38 

How Will We Excuse Ourselves? By H. B. Horst, 38 
The Visit. By J. H. Miller, 38 

Home and Family, — 

The Girl Who Does Things. By Martha B. Lah- 

man, 39 

The Beautiful Blue Days. By Oma Karn, 39 

Sisters' Aid Societies 39 

General Missionary and Tract Department. 

A Good Work by Monks 43 

From North St. Joseph, Missouri. By W. H. Senger, 43 

From Cuba. By Emma B. Kreider, .43 

Missionary Committee of Middle Iowa. By E. C. 

Trostle, 43 

Pomona, California. By Susie Forney, 43 

On the Way to India. By Ella Miller, 43 

Second District of West Virginia. By J. F. Ross, ..43 

AROUND THE W ORLD 

A writer in one of the Chicago dailies a short time 
ago said some things about the liquor traffic which 
should stir men to action. Among other things : " This 
annual drink bill of the United States, if stacked up 
in silver dollars, would reach two thousand three hun- 
dred and seventy miles toward heaven, and this blood 
money must be a great stench in the nostrils of a 
just God. This terrible traffic connects earth with hell. 
and devils laugh as one hundred thousand of our 
citizens are annually sacrificed by the suffrage of a 
civilized Christian nation." The men who get drunk- 
are punished and their families suffer; but the men 
who make the stuff that makes the drunkard pay the 
government a tax and then have an unrestricted right 
to ruin any boy or man, placing him in the gutter, 
the asylum or the pQorhouse, and shutting him out of 
heaven. There will "come a day of fearful reckoning in 
which those responsible for the liquor traffic cannot 
escape their just reward. 



Last year more immigrants came to the United 
States than ever came in one year before. But the 
class was not as desirable, for many more come from 
the south than from the north of Europe. Italy, 
including Sicily and Sardinia, sent 273,120; Austria- 
Hungary sent 265,138; the Russian empire and Fin- 
land sent 215,665. From these countries more than 
three-quarters of a million came. Fifteen hundred 
came from China and more than thirteen thousand 
Japanese. The increase in the number of immigrants 
is to some extent due to the agents of the steamship 
companies who scour the countries in order to get 
people to come. The south received only four per 
cent of those coming to America. There probably 
will be a change in this now that it has been decided 
that a State may induce immigraton. It is not good 
for the country or for those who come if they stick 
so close together that they do not become Americanized 
after coming. 



Whether there is to be a progressive tax on for- 
tunes and incomes is for the future to decide ; but it 
seems that more and more men are looking upon 
some. plan of the kind with favor. A short time ago 
Mr. Andrew Carnegie speaking on this subject said: 
" We shall ultimately have to consider the adoption 
of some such scheme as a progressive tax on all for- 
tunes beyond a certain amount, either given in life 
or bequeathed at death, so that it will be impossible 
for the owners of enormous fortunes to hand any more 
than a certain amount to any individual." He thinks 
that the time is coming when brains will stand above 
dollars and conduct above both. The money-maker 
will not then be as highly esteemed as he is now. A 
change of this kind is very much to be desired, but 
the tendency is in the other direction at present. 



The Colorado River has not yet been returned to its 
channel, but continues to flow into Salton Sea, flood- 
ing the Imperial Valley of California and endangering 
hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of property. 
In a message to congress last week President Roose- 
velt asked that two million dollars be appropriated to 
close the break in the river, and an additional sum 
to carry out the irrigation which the private company 
was unable to handle. To show the importance of the 
matter he says: " If the break" in the Colorado is not 
permanently controlled the financial loss to the United 
States wilt be great. The entire irrigatable area, 
which will be either submerged or deprived of water 
in the Imperial Valley and along the Colorado River, 
is eapable of adding to the permanent population of 
Arizona and California at least three hundred and 
fifty thousand people and probably five hundred thou- 
sand. Much of the land will be worth from five 
hundred to a thousand dollars an acre to individual 
owners, or a total of from three hundred and fifty 
million to seven hundred million dollars." 



Last Saturday night there was held at the home 
of Mrs. Potter Palmer in Chicago a conference which 
may result in a branch of the Civic Federation being 
organized with headquarters in Chicago. Representa- 
tives of employers and employes were present at the 
conference, and the general opinion was that it would 
be well for the two classes to get closer together. 
Seth Low, speaking for the Civic Federation, said :. 
" We want to make strikes infrequent, if it is not 
possible to eliminate them altogether. I am pleased 
to say that we have succeeded in averting a great 
many strikes. We work on the theory that the average 
employer and the average workingman want to be 
fair. They see things from a different point of view, 
and our mission is to bring them together and have 
them exchange ideas. ... If the employer will 
not meet the employe we believe in going after both 
and getting them together." Millions of dollars would 
annually be saved to both classes if they would get 
together and settle their differences as reasoning and 
reasonable men should. 



Experiments made in Germany seem to show that 
deep sea fish can be acclimated in fresh water, and 
will live and breed in rivers. A number of different 
kinds of fish were taken from the sea, including 
whiting, herring, sole, and flounders, and kept in a 
pond of salt water. The percentage of salt was 
gradually lessened by the addition of fresh water until 
finally no salt remained. Practically no material 
difference took place in the fish, which were as lively 
and healthy after the treatment as when taken out of 
the sea. So encouraging has been the result, after a 
test extending over several months, that the fish now 
are being introduced into the various rivers and fresh 



water lakes in order to bring experiments to a practical 
issue. The success of this experiment may change 
entirely the fishing industry. Fish are an important 
article of food, and to increase the number of them 
and distribute them more widely will benefit the 
people. 



There were in the United States a few more 
Iynchings in 1906 than in 1905, but not as many as 
in 1904. The citizens of fourteen States took the law 
into their own hands in 1906 and were led by their 
passions to commit murder ; and as a result, seventy- 
two persons met violent deaths. The record for these 
lawless executions is as follows: Alabama, five; 
Arkansas, four; Florida, six; Georgia, nine; Indian 
Territory, one; Kentucky, three; Louisiana, nine; 
Mississippi, thirteen; Maryland, one; Missouri, three; 
North Carolina, five; South Carolina, six; Tennessee, 
two; Texas, six. Maryland is the farthest State 
north in which a lynching occurred. Human life is 
held very cheap. Men refuse to obey the divine com- 
mand which says not to kill. There is need of teaching 
along this line, for murders are committed in all scc- 
cions of the country. 

The name of God will disappear from the coins of 
France. This is one of the results of the law of 
separation of church and state. "God preserve 
France " appeared on the five and twenty franc 
pieces. The demand to have this removed was at 
first considered ridiculous, but now the government has 
approved it, and orders have been given to remove 
the inscription from all coins which return to the 
treasury and omit it in the future from new coins. 
The words used so often, " Liberte, Fraternite, Egal- 
ite " — Liberty, Fraternity, Equality — will take the 
place of the others. The removal of the name of God 
from the coins does not mean that the French have 
become entirely irreligious; more than a hundred 
years ago some of them thought they had dethroned 
God and put reason in his place. This action shows 
a condition which does not promise well for the future 
of France. 



James J. Hill, of the Great Northern Railroad, 
says that the railroads are " swamped " and that there 
is danger of the present freight blockade becoming 
worse. In ten years railroad business has increased a 
hundred and ten per cent, while facilities have in- 
creased from twenty-one to forty-five per cent. He 
thinks that fifteen thousand miles of additional trackage 
should be built each year for the next five years. The 
cost would be over a billion dollars a year. Another 
suggested remedy is the construction of a fifteen-foot 
ship canal from St. Louis to New Orleans. More 
interior markets and better terminal facilities are 
needed. 



For the third time within a short period a Russian 
general has been killed by a terrorist. Wednesday 
of last week a young man dressed as a military clerk 
succeeded in approaching General Pavloff and with an 
automatic pistol fired seven shots into him. He died 
while being carried to his apartments. Some time 
ago when questioned in the lower house of parliament 
concerning the courts-martial and executions in the 
Baltic provinces and Poland he justified them in such 
a coldblooded manner that he was forced from the 
rostrum by threats of violence and was called mur- 
derer and hangman. The young man who killed him 
was full of glee because he had succeeded. It is said 
that the organization to which the assassin belongs has 
sentenced the czar and some of his ministers to death. 
There are evidently dark days ahead for the Russian 
government and the Russian people. 



mam 



mtm 



"THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 19, 1907. 



ESS A VS 



FACE TO FACE WITH TROUBLE. 



Selected by Effie E. Miller. Jonesboro, Tent). 

You are face to face with trouble, 
And the skies are murk and gray; 
You hardly know which way to turn, 
You are almost dazed, you say. 
And at night you wake to wonder 
What the next day's news will bring; 
Your pillow is brushed by phantom care, 
With a grim and ghastly wing. 

You are face to face with trouble; 
A child has gone astray; 
A ship is wrecked on the bitter sea; 
There's a note you cannot pay, 
Your brave right hand is feeble, 
Your sight is growing blind 
Perhaps a friend is stern and cold 
Who was ever warm and kind. 

You are face to face with trouble! 

No wonder you cannot sleep; 

But stay — and think of the promise: 

The Lord will safely keep 

And lead you out of the thicket. 

And into the pasture land; 

You have only to walk straight onward, 

Holding the dear Lord's hand. 

Face to face with trouble; 

And did you forget to look 

As the dear old father taught you 

For help to the dear old Book? 

You have heard the tempter whisper, 

And you had no heart to pray; 

And God was dropped from your scheme of life 

For many and many a day. 

Then face to face with trouble, 
It is thus that he calls you back 
From the land of dearth and famine, 
To the land which has no lack. 
You would not hear in the sunshine 
You hear in the midnight gloom; 
Behold, his tapers kindle 
Like stars in the quiet room. 

Oh! face to face with trouble, 

Friend, I have often stood, 

To learn that pain hath sweetness. 

To know that God is good. 

Arise and meet the daylight 

Be strong, and do your best! 

With an honest heart and a childlike faith 

That God will do the rest. 

— Mrs. Margaret E. Sangster. 



WHY THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN JOHN AND 
THE SYNOPTICS. 



BY WM. M. HOWE. 

Jesus came and lived and went again, and the world 
was better for it. Many learned to love him and 
being saved by him devoted their lives to him. When 
he was gone from their midst as well as when he was 
present with them, they sought in every good and 
proper way to commend him to all men, everywhere. 

Some there were who sought persistently to acquaint 
the Jews with the fact that Jesus is their King. Others 
devoted themselves to the Romans, and still others 
to the Greeks with the hope of bringing them in touch 
with the Savior of the world. 

Wisdom dictated that their teaching and their story 
of the Christ should always be modified to suit those 
to whom they spoke. In no case would any teacher 
or evangelist think it necessary or even proper to 
give, in order, all the events in the life of Jesus. Their 
prime object in each case was to give him. 

As the years rolled by a desire was felt that this 
teaching which the nations had received concerning 
Jesus should be put on record. Matthew was inspired 
to write for the Jews that which is in the Gospel which 
bears his name. 

So, too, Mark was led of God to record an abstract 
of the teaching that was carried to the Romans. With 
good reason he attracted the Romans by emphasizing 
the fact that Jesus was the servant of all and of God. 

Luke was likewise called of God to set forth in 



writing those things in which the Greeks had been 
instructed. In his record Jesus is seen as the Son of 
Man — interested in all men, certainly therefore in the 
Greeks. 

These presentations of Jesus were all evangelical 
in their nature and were written, therefore, primarily 
with the view of making converts and they no doubt 
well served that purpose all the years that since have 
fled. 

Thousands of converts were made in the first few 
years after the crucifixion of our Lord even before 
any sort of record was made of his life. These and 
later converts had to be nurtured — fed on the sincere 
milk of the Word. For them was necessary a kind 
of teaching that differed from that which turned them 
from darkness to light, and in time there was a demand 
to have that teaching put in writing. 

Once more God found the man, and by his Spirit, 
John was prepared and induced to put in black and 
white those things concerning the Master which tended 
to make strong, fullgrown men in Christ Jesus out of 
the babes that had been born into the kingdom. John's 
portrait represented Jesus the Savior as the Son of 
the Living God. 

Some have wondered why these 'four biographies of 
our Lord do so poorly harmonize— why each omits 
important matter and why each gives events not men- 
tioned by the others. But the purposes of the writers, 
as we have seen, make the student of these Gospels 
no longer stumble at the thought of their difference. 
The fact is, there is little attempt by any one of 
these four writers to present a complete record of 
the life of Christ. Not one of them aims primarily 
at a biography of our Lord. All told, they do not give 
a fair account of the life of him of whom they write. 
Their aim is a higher one. Each would present a 
proper and acceptable portrait of the character of 
Jesus the Christ to those to whom they wrote. 

The Synoptics present him as a Man among men 
with a view of having all people repent and receive 
him as their Master. No wonder they harmonize 
so well. 

John presents him as God among men — God in the 
flesh — to those who are the children of God. No 
wonder he differs as much as he does from the 
records of the Synoptics. He had no occasion to refer 
to the birth of Jesus and to his childhood experiences. 
He emphasizes the preexistence — the divinity rather 
than the humanity of our Lord. 

John does not record the parable which Jesus spake 
nor his teaching about the earthly kingdom. He 
rather gives the teaching concerning him. 

John omits the temptations of Jesus and the severe 
conflicts with the Pharisees and the rulers of the Jews. 
His is rather a message of peace and joy, of life and 
of rest. 

It is evident that John had a good object in writing, 
and, moreover, in writing what he did and to an 
important degree the order in which he put it. It is 
the privilege of any child of God to study John, the 
man, and his purposes. He who does will at least be 
better able to appreciate John's Gospel and to solve 
its several problems. 
323 Sixtieth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



RETURN OF THE JEWS. 



BY NOAH LONGANECKER. 

" In Ezekiel 47 and 4S, we read that the land will again 
be divided among the twelve tribes of Israel, and that the 
former order of worship will be reestablished. 

"When and how will that be?" 

Much of what is recorded in these two chapters 
must be understood typically and' spiritually. Much 
of the prophecy will be fulfilled when the children of 
Israel return to Palestine from their present captivity, 
to worship God in spirit and truth. Isaiah, Jeremiah, 
Ezekiel, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Micah, Zephaniah, and 
Paul, all prophesy of such a time. I fail to find in 
the above two chapters "that the former order of 
worship will be reestablished." Jewish sacrifices now 
would deny the sufficiency of the sacrifice of Christ. 
The Jews will believe in the atonement by Christ 



when they return from their dispersion. More of 
this anon. 

Permit one of the many of the prophecies of the 
'Old Testament referring to their return to Palestine: 
" I will bring you out from the people, and will gather 
you out of the countries wherein ye are scattered, with 
a mighty hand, and with a stretched out arm, and 
with fury poured out. For in my holy mountain, in 
the mountain of the height of Israel, saith the Lord 
God, there shall all the house of Israel, all of them 
in the land, serve me : there will I accept them, and 
there will I require your offerings, and the firstfruits 
of your oblations, with all your holy things." Ezek. 
20:34, 40. This will be a new thing to find a 
Christian church, mostly composed of Jews, in the 
land of Palestine. We say mostly, for in Ezek. 47: 23 
we read, " And it shall come to pass that in what triba 
the stranger sojourneth, there shall ye give him his 
inheritance, saith the Lord God." 

As to the name of their city, Ezek. 48:35 is very 
pleasing. " The name of the city from that day shall 
be, The Lord is there." This of course means more 
than a mere name. The Jews rejected Christ as the 
Messiah. A vail of darkness and unbelief was over 
them. They were rejected and dispersed. When their 
vail of unbelief is taken away they will then return 
from their dispersion. 

The apostle Paul answers the "how" in the query as 
follows: "When it shall turn to the Lord, the vail shall 
be taken away." The word it surely means the Jews 
as a people; it may not be proper to speak of them 
uozv as a nation. This language implies that there 
will be a conversion of the Jews to Christianity. I 
love to think of Romans 11, as the gospel of the Jews. 
It may seem somewhat mysterious, but Paul says, " I 
would not, brethren, that ye should be ignorant of 
this mystery, lest ye should be wise in your own 
conceits; that blindness in part is happened to Israel, 
until the fullness of the Gentiles be come in. And so 
all Israel shall be saved." " And he will destroy in 
this mountain the face of the covering cast over all 
people, and the vail that is spread over all nations." 
Isa. 25:7. This makes it plain that Paul and Isaiah 
refer to the same time and place. 

The " when " may ask for the day or year of this 
event. It is not revealed. The Lord will gather the 
Jews again. But he works through means. It is 
said, " The blood of the saints is the seed of the 
church." The czar and Turk may learn this by bitter 
experience. The signs are ominous. The great con- 
cern the church takes to preach the Gospel to every 
creature is surely not the least omen. To us it seems 
almost impossible to prevail on the Jews to embrace 
the Christian religion. With God all things are ' 
possible. 

Hariville, Ohio. 



THE LORD'S DAY. 



BY CHAS M. YEAROUT. 

" Will you please let me know what day the apostle 
John means in Rev. 1: 10 where he says The Lord's Day? " 

The Lord's Day is the day made glorious by the 
Lord's triumph over death, hell, and the grave. The 
entire work of Christ, including the plan of salvation, 
would have been a failure had it not been for his 
resurrection ; for had the grave held fast the Lord, it 
would have forever held fast the entire human family, 
and the people would be yet in their sins. 

" The stone which the builders refused is become 
the head of the corner. This is the Lord's doing; it 
is marvellous in our eyes. This is the day which the 
Lord hath made; we will rejoice and be glad in it." 
Psa. 118:22-24. That this scripture refers to Christ 
and his plan of salvation, I think none will deny. 

I read an account once, stating that in the building 
of Solomon's temple there was a peculiar, odd-shaped 
stone that the builders rejected and cast aside, treading 
it under their feet ; but in completing the temple this 
rejected stone in the dust of earth proved to be the 
chief corner-stone. See Acts 4: 11, 12; Eph. 2:20; 
1 Peter 2 : 7. 

The rejected stone was Christ; the builders were the 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 19, 1907. 



Jewish people who refused and cast him out; and the 
day that he made was his resurrection day, when he 
triumphed over the devil, his emissaries and the abodes 
of death, and " led captivity captive," — a day of re- 
joicing and gladness, because of the great victory 
over the enemies of mankind. The day of rejoicing 
and gladness came after Christ had been rejected and 
cast out, and arose from the chamber of death ; hence 
could not refer to the Jewish Sabbath ; for that day had 
been observed by God's people for many years, and 
Christ lay dormant in the embrace of death all day on 
the Sabbath, and burst the bars of death, and came 
forth a victor early on the first day of the week, and 
it has been a great and notable day to the world ever 
since. 

The prophet Malachi says: " Behold, I will send you 
Elijah the prophet before the coming of the great and 
dreadful day of the Lord." Mai. 4: 5. This prophecy 
was fulfilled in the coming of John the Baptist. Matt. 
11': 14; 17: 10-13. 

The apostle Peter in rehearsing the prophecy of Joel 
says: "The sun shall be turned into darkness; and 
the moon into blood, before that great and notable 
day of the Lord come." Joel 2:31; Acts 2 : 20. The 
sun was darkened, and the earth covered with darkness 
on the Friday that Christ was crucified from twelve 
o'clock till three in the afternoon, and his lifeless 
body was laid in the silent tomb the same evening. 
The loving followers of the Lord are filled with 
sorrow and weeping; in sadness and amazement they 
wend their sorrowful ways. His enemies rejoice over 
their seeming victory, and go to the governor and 
ask for soldiers to guard the silent tomb till after 
the third day. But notwithstanding the Roman guard 
and all the precaution of the Jews, the great and 
notable day of the Lord had come. Christ arose from 
the dead, and his loving disciples rejoice and are glad. 

This truly was the Lord's Day, and a notable day 
of the Lord ; for this day witnessed the triumph of the 
Lord, and the liberation of a world bound in chains 
and fetters of sin under the dominion of Satan. The 
glad tidings of the angel to the women who arrived 
early Sunday morning at the sepulchre were: " He is 
not here: for he is risen, as he said. Come see the 
place where the Lord lay." There lie the grave-clothes, 
but the Lord is gone : the tomb is empty. 

The Pentecostal coming of the Holy Spirit and 
inspiration of the church transpired on the Lord's Day 
or the Lord's resurrection day. If, as some contend, 
the seventh day should be called the Lord's Day 
because God rested on that day, how much more 
should the first day of the week be called the Lord's 
Day because the Lord arose from the dead on that 
day. 

When John was in the Spirit on the Lord's Day, 
the Lord who made that day great and notable, and 
gave cause' for all his people to " rejoice and be glad 
in it," appeared unto him and said: " I am Alpha and 
Omega, the first and the last." Christ did not become 
such until his glorious resurrection day. He could 
not save his people without first triumphing over their 
most deadly enemy, death. The results of Christ's 
resurrection on the first day of the week were more 
far-reaching, uplifting, and beneficial to the human 
family than was God's resting upon the seventh day. 

The Lord's Day is the day the Lord made glorious, 
the great day of the Lord, the notable day of the Lord. 
And from the following considerations, we conclude 
was Christ's resurrection day or the first day of the 
week: 

(1.) The Stone — Christ — was rejected by the 
builders — the Jews — before the day was made. 

(2.) The day was made a day of rejoicing and 
gladness because of Christ's triumph over death, and 
the salvation he brought to a lost and ruined world on 
that day. 

(3.) The great day of the Lord did not come till 
after John the Baptist had accomplished his mission 
in the world. 

(4.) There was no day greater than the one that 
witnessed the liberating of the human family from the 
clutches of Satan. 

(5.) The notable day of the Lord could not come 
till after the sun was darkened. 



(6.) The day of Christ's resurrection was notable, 
and none greater, nor more far-reaching since the early 
'dawn of creation. 

(7.) The Holy Spirit descended upon the first day 
of the week, confirming and sealing the work of Christ. 

(8.) The Holy Spirit was to lead the followers of 
Christ into all truth, and he led them to regard the 
first day of the week as the Lord's Day, — a day of 
worship, thanksgiving, and praise to the risen Lord. 

Mulberry Grove, III. 



ETERNAL LIFE. 



BY JOHN E. MOHLER. 

Many persons look forward to the time when they 
shall give up the present life and inherit eternal life. 
Eternal life, they think of as a gift held for them just 
beyond the borders of the grave. If they live 
righteously here they hope for it as their reward. 
This idea, however, is an error. 

The very words, " eternal life," signify something 
different. And the scriptures teach something dif- 
ferent. 

Eternal means without end. Without end in the 
past or the future. Eternal life is life without end. 
It is life without end in the past or the future. Eternal 
life has always existed. It has existed as long as God 
has existed. Were this not true it would not be eternal. 
This we must conclude from the meaning of the term. 

Inasmuch, then, as eternal life always' was, and 
always will be, it now is. It is this eternal life which 
is given to God's children. 

And eternal life is given now. The gift is not with- 
held until after the death of the body, but is given 
as soon as we are adopted into God's family. Christ 
meant this when he said, " He that heareth my word, 
and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting- 
life, and shall not come into condemnation ; but is 
passed from death unto life." John 5:24. 

This represents actual possession of eternal life now. 
And in further support of this is John's testimony, 
"We know that we have passed (not will pass) from 
death unto life." 1 John 3: 14. 

We therefore possess eternal life right now. 

It is this life of the soul which shall live on into 
the next world. 

The present is a part of eternity. 

And we now possess "the life which shall endure 
eternally. 

We are not given a different kind of life in the 
' next world. It is the same life now in our soul, but 
amidst different environments. 

There the adversary will have lost his destructive 
power. Our associates wifl be those who have eternal 
life, as we have. There will be no death in the land. 
There will be only beauty to see with our eyes, and 
only harmony to hear with our ears. All about us 
will be different. But it will be the same life we now 
have as soon as we become children of God. 

This means that we are beginning to live heaven 
now, and that the divine life in us is striving now 
for the perfection of heaven. 

For its harmony. 

Its unselfishness. 

Its good fellowship. 

Its love. 

And its service. 

Tins means more than that pious idea that Christians 
are to sojourn in this world as strangers bent only, 
or mainly, upon gaining entrance into a better world. 
For the eternal life in us tries to make heaven upon 
earth, as we go along; to give heaven's blessings, 
heaven's love, heaven's harmony, heaven's peace. 

In fact, it is pretty safe to prophesy that the soul 
which does not enjoy efforts to bring heavenly con- 
ditions upon the earth will have little joy in heaven's 
conditions in the next world. 

If we would enjoy heaven, then, we must enjoy 
making heaven in our heart and our own home and 
our own neighborhood and our own church. For the 
same life which shall be in us then, to enjoy heaven, 
is in us now. 



And we who live upon earth are being given op- 
portunity to practice making the conditions we shall 
enjoy there. 

What did Christ do upon earth but try continually 
to make heaven here, and point his hearers to the 
time when heaven in its perfection might be theirs? 
His example forcefully teaches that the way to heaven 
is by obeying God and trying to make heaven as we 
live here. 

Those who do this need have no uncertainty about 
their future, if they remain faithful. I dislike to hear 
persons speak of living " in hope of eternal life," 
except as they refer to the better conditions in the next 
world. For they have, already, eternal life as truly 
as they will ever have, if they are God's children. 

But the man who brings and augments contention, 
sadness, trouble, and gloom about him, deliberately and 
knowingly, has no right to hope for eternal life in any 
world, for he is not using his opportunity to live 
that life just now. when he is called upon to do it. 
And instead of eternal life, he is doomed to certain 
death, as he should be, for there is no place for such 
a life, in heaven. 

Manistique, Mich. 



A GROUP OF EFFECTIVE ORDINANCES. 



HY JOHN C. JOHNSON. 

The Lord's supper was instituted by Christ on the 
last night he was with his disciples before his appre- 
hension and conviction. It was a full evening meal 
preceded by the washing of the saints' feet and 
succeeded by the blessing and the partaking of bread 
and wine. This threefold service, like faith, repent- 
ance and baptism, is of divine and not of human 
authority, and belongs to the new and not to the old 
covenant. 

This sacred service should never be referred to as 
the " last supper," but the first. No religious service 
like this was ever held previous to the last night that 
Christ met with his disciples in the upper room or 
guest chamber of the good man's house in the city of 
Jerusalem. 

The washing of the disciples' feet as a religious rite 
is the first congregational washing we have any account 
of in all the history of the past. True, there were pre- 
Mosaic feet-washings; for instance, water was fur- 
nished by hosts to their guests who washed their own 
feet. Under the Mosaic law the priest washed his 
own feet on entering the tabernacle, but no priest was 
required to wash the feet of another priest, No 
washing of feet was required of king, priest, or con- 
gregation in the celebration of the passover service; 
and, in fact, on no feast occasion were the Jews re- 
quired by law to wash their feet as a sacred or religious 
rite. 

We can in no way dispense with this most sacred 
threefold service and still retain our relation with 
Christ, our fellowship and Christian relation in the 
great system of divine grace. 

The first part of this sacred service is an expression 
of the process or action of nobleman and servant in 
the exchange of administration, — wash one another's 
feet, — a deep sense of humility and equal standing on 
one common level. 

The meal is an expression of an attained social re- 
lation in brotherly love, demonstrating and reflecting 
the divine character and love of Christ, and in this 
way preparing us more fully for the solemn and re- 
flective part of this holy service. 

The bread and wine are emblematical of the broken 
body and shed blood of Christ, reminding us so forcibly 
of the great offering and sacrifice made by Christ for 
sins; appealing to our higher and more refined senses 
and demonstrating to us most fully the love of God 
the Father, and the tender affection of Christ, his only 
Son, for the salvation of the human family. 

In no case are the principles of the divine and saving 
graces of the " Three in One " combined with such 
unity and efficiency as in this group of holy ordinances. 
Ordinances illustrate principles. " If ye know these 
things, blessed are ye if ye do them." 
Huntingdon, Pa. 






36 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 19, 1907. 



THE SEPTUAGINT. 



lid to have been 



BY NATHAN MARTIN. 

The Septuagint is the name of the first translation 
of the Old Testament Scriptures from the original 
Hebrew into the Greek language. It is by far the most 
important of the earlier translations and is the oldest 
in any language. Other names applied to it are, The 
Alexandrine Version and The Version of the Sev- 
enty. In literature it is often represented simply as 
The I.XX. 

Right here let us notice that a few historically im- 
portant data are completely enveloped in the obscurity 
of legend and tradition. While 285 B. C. is generally 
accepted as the date, it cannot be positively established 
when the work was done. The dates assigned vary 
from 2S0 B. C. almost to the birth of Christ. By 
whom the translation was_ made, in what length of 
time, whether all at one time, or at different times, 
are all matters of conjecture. Even the supposition 
that there were seventy-two translators, Jewish schol- 
ars, although recorded by Josephus and quoted by 
many an author since his time, is largely discredited 
by modem scholars. It is now quite generally agreed 
upon that the translation is the work not only of 
different hands, but of separate times. It is probable 
that at first only the Pentateuch was completed and 
the other books gradually added. The language was 
the Hellenistic Greek, based on the Attic dialect. 

The Septuagint was the Bible our Lord used and 
quoted from, as well as the evangelists and apostles. 
Every careful reader of the Bible has noticed that the 
scriptures which -the New Testament writers borrow 
from the Old Testament are not. as a rule, quoted 
word for word. This is explained in this way: The 
Old Testament we use was translated directly from 
Hebrew into English. The apostles, when they quoted, 
used a Greek rendering of the Hebrew original, and 
then later their works, being in the Greek, were also 
translated into English. This extra translation may 
easily account for slightly different wordings, but 
in no case is the meaning sacrificed. 

In the year 323 B. C, at Babylon, died Alexander 
the Great, the man who had conquered the world and 
sighed for more worlds to conquer. He left two sons, 
both of whom were murdered soon after his death. 
No single ruler was found who could hold intact 
the vast empire he had gained. His generals, after 
about twenty years of contention, divided the territory 
into four parts. 

To Ptolemy Soter fell Egypt and, later on, Pales- 
tine. The Ptolemies ruled in Egypt for three hundred 
years. The second of the dynasty was Ptolemy Phil- 
adelphus, one of the greatest of Egypt's kings and a 
great friend of the Jews. He was the builder of the 
great lighthouse of Pharos and the founder of the 
library of Alexandria. He is generally credited, fur- 
ther, with having been the promoter and patron of the 
Septuagint. " This," as Blaikie says, " was one of the 
most important missinoary works performed by man." 
Let us now look at the conditions and circumstances 
which demanded such a version. In +45 B.^C, one 
hundred and sixty years before the completion of the 
Septuagint. the last company of exiled Jews had re- 
turned under Nehemiah. Most of them had already 
forgotten the Hebrew language, having been so 
long and so closely in touch with the influence of a 
powerful nation. Greek was the leading language, 
and into Greek the Bible must be put if to be read and 
taught. 

Again, the Jews had now become an important 
people outside of the borders of the Holy Land. -Al- 
exander's entire policy, as well as the rulings of his 
successors, had all conspired to a mingling of Jewish 
commerce and religion with Greek culture. At the 
beginning of the Christian era there were in Alexan- 
dria and vicinity about one million Jews. Some had 
come by choice, others by constraint of circumstances. 
They were in charge of the best locations for trade 
throughout the city. They controlled almost absolute- 
ly the shipping in the harbor. Their civil privileges 
had been granted them by Julius Caesar and others of 
the Roman emperors. Their Sanhedrim almost equal- 
led in dignity the one in Jerusalem. Their synagogue 
was the grandest in the world and so large that the 



signal for the " Alliens ' 
by means of a flag. 

This coming in contact with Greek philosophy and ■ 
culture was not without its effect on the Jews. For, 
even though they have always clung tenaciously to 
their national peculiarities, they have also shown a re- 
markable power of adapting themselves to times and 
surroundings. Especially was this true in the matter 
of language. The sacred Hebrew was being gradual- 
ly, but surely, eclipsed by the Greek, the language of 
learning and culture. 

The appearance of the version, when it was finally 
produced, was to the Jews of Alexandria an occasion 
of the highest joy. The writings of Plato and Pythar 
goras were considered the standard of perfection 
throughout the Gentile world. The Jews could now 
bring a Greek version of Moses and the prophets side 
by side with the writings of the philosophers and let 
every Greek decide 'on the comparative merits of each 
class. The tenets of the Jewish religion were rapidly 
disseminated and thereby gained respect. 

The Alexandrian Jews kept the day of the publica- 
tion of the Septuagint as an annual feast-day. On 
this day they visited, amid the greatest rejoicing, the 
cells on the island of Pharos, in which tradition said 
the version had been finished by supernatural aid. 

Quite another class of people were the Jews who 
taught in the schools of Jerusalem and those through- 
out Palestine. They scornfully denied that God had 
granted inspiration to the translators. To them it was 
the height of misfortune to have the teachings of their 
system rendered into a profane language. They ques- 
tioned even the possibility of translating divine truth 
into any other speech that that of God's chosen people 
without sacrificing the subtler shades of meaning. 
Again, the translators might make concessions to the 
prejudices of the heathen and never be detected. 

In striking contrast to the Hellenists, they kept the 
anniversary of publication as a fast. It was a day to 
be associated in their memories with the day when, 
at Sinai, their fathers worshiped the golden calf. 

Taking the two views together, historians point 
out a number of far-reaching considerations. The 
rabbis of Jerusalem were not entirely wrong in sus- 
pecting the " wisdom of the Ionians." The publica- 
tion of the Bible in Greek did alter the conceptions of 
the Tews, especially under surroundings so different. 
It threw down, to a great extent, the middle wall of 
partition between them and the Gentiles. It showed 
the absurdity of many of the legends on which they 
based their spiritual aristocracy. Judaism, when 
robbed of its exclusiveness, was far less a distinctive 
religion. In short, the appearance of the Septuagint 
did much to prepare the way for Christianity. 

The Septuagint has been the object of much criti- 
cism. The' seventy may not have realized fully that 
the duty of translators is faithfulness even to the 
minutest detail. Private opinions are traceable in many 
instances. The literal meaning of certain passages 
was largely determined by the spirit of the age and the 
tone of thought prevalent at the time. Yet. in spite 
of its faults and imperfections, it served as an impor- 
tant link in the great work of revealing God and his 
ways to mankind. 
Elisabethtoim, Pa. 



WHAT THE SIGNS WOULD SHOW. 



BY FRANK P. JOHN. 

When walking along the streets of our cities or 
towns we observe signs of every description. We see 
signs and advertisements of almost every kind of 
business. Passing in front of a store building we 
notice here a large shoe, a few feet high. What does 
this mean? It means, " I, the man on the inside, am 
the shoe man, — the shoemaker. Come in and see the 
workmanship of my hands." We pass on a little 
farther; we now see in the window the sign of the 
jeweler. He has on hand the beautiful vase, the 
beautifully carved gold-headed cane, the costly cut- 
glass and many other useful articles. But what does 
this say to us? "I am the jeweler man. See what 
I have procured for my customers. Come in and 
purchase what you need." And thus we go on, passing 



sign after sign, representing the work of the many 
different vocations in life. 

And now we have come to a fine large building on 
the corner of the block, the most conspicuous place 
for a business house. It is called the Legal American 
Saloon. Does this man place in the windows of the 
building what he is able to accomplish with his wares? 
Does he, in this way, show to the world around him 
what he is doing? Certainly not. Here may be seen 
the most beautiful paintings man can produce. Here 
may be heard the sweetest of music. Everything 
externally is so beautiful. It seems that some people 
can really succeed in making sin look beautiful. 

If the saloon men were to put out signs, showing 
what they are really doing, what would they be? 
Would there be shown the blooming American youth 
in all his purity ? Would there be shown the lives and 
characters of Christian men and Christian women? 
Would there be shown even the principle of honesty 
which we all love and admire? Assuredly not. There 
would be shown the raving maniac, the murderers, 
thieves and outlaws of every kind. There would be 
the ragged, homeless, hungry children, the broken- 
hearted widows and mothers. There would be a large 
per cent of the penitentiary victims of our nation. 
and sin and crime in all of their low and debasing 
features. 

Is that all ? There would be the one hundred thou- 
sand men that, each year in our own nation, go down 
to the untimely drunkard's grave, and to the hell in 
the world to come. The Bible plainly states that no 
drunkard shall inherit the kingdom of God. There 
would be the sixty thousand girls wdio go down each 
year, in our own land, to the grave of sin and crime, 
to stand before their eternal God in judgment. What 
a terrible sign for a set of men to have out. And yet 
these men are doing a so-called legal business ; they 
are protected by the laws of our land. 

Is the saloon-keeper to bear all of the blame ? What 
are we, as individual citizens, doing in regard to this 
question? Are we working* against this terrible curse? 
Our feelings may be on the right side of the issue, but 
what are we doing? That's the question. This is a 
question on which we cannot be neutral. We are on . 
one side or we are on the other. The saloon evil 
exists because of your suffrage and mine. Does every 
professor of Christianity vote against the liquor 
traffic? If not, are we altogether guiltless? The 
great question is, " Does it exist in spite of us, or 
because of us ? " Each one of us should answer that 
question. 

It is not enough to be good, but we must work and 
strive to help others to a higher plane of living. It is 
not enough to be total abstainers, but we must work 
to help others overcome the fight, and if possible keep 
the future generations from having this terrible sin 
to fight, and thus we will help them in the work of 
saving souls, by. removing as much as possible this 
the greatest hindrance to happiness the world has ever 
known. 

This question is to-day knocking at the heart of 
every true woman and man. It is at the very door 
of our homes. This is a question the writer believes 
to -be second only to that of the salvation of mankind. 
Let us put out our signs and get to work, working hard 
to see that which is high, holy, righteous and uplifting 
put upon the throne and that which is low, debasing 
and soul-killing put upon the gallows. 
Lccton, Mo. 



SPIRITUAL LIFE. 



BY I. J. ROSENBERGER. 

" I am come that they might have life, and that they 
might have it more abundantly." — Jesus. 

Liee is defined as being that state or condition in 
which the . organs . are capable of performing their 
functions. 

1. The Source of Spritml Life.— On this point 
there are two theories, one, " that spiritual life is the 
result of spontaneous generation ; that is, that it can 
be produced by native proneness independent of exter- 
nal force." There are those who claim to have grown 
better and better within themselves until they arrived 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 19, 1907. 



37 



at a life that is spiritual. The other theory is that 
" spiritual life as well as all other forms of life is the 
result of preexisting life." The scriptural testimony 
on these points, is clear, as to the carnal life, Paul 
says : " God giveth to all life and breath and all things." 
Job says: " In whose hands is the soul of every living 
thing, and the breath of all mankind." As to the 
spiritual we read : " Christ hath brought life and 
immortality to light through the Gospel." Again, 
" Eternal life is the gift of God through Jesus Christ 
our Lord." These texts make this phase of our sub- 
ject clear. 

We see that the different kingdoms in nature 
remain distinct; such, for example, as the animal and 
the vegetable; the organic and the inorganic. Paul 
points out the same fact between the natural and the 
spiritual kingdoms. " The natural man receiveth not 
the things of the Spirit of God, for they are foolishness 
to him, neither can he know them, because they are 
spiritually discerned." The foregoing makes the doc- 
trine of regeneration all clear, so pointedly taught by 
Christ to Nicodemus: "Ye must be born again." 
Natural conception and natural birth brought us into 
this kingdom of nature. It will require spiritual con- 
ception and a spiritual birth to bring us into the 
spiritual kingdom, where we may enjoy spiritual life. 
It will require a supreme hand to lift, to translate a soul 
from nature's kingdom to the kingdom of God's dear 
Son. A child is conceived and born into the world 
by a mutual cooperation of influences. In like manner 
does it require mutual cooperation to bring a soul into 
this kingdom of grace. " We arc coworkers with 
God." 

The coercive measures often employed in conversion, 
especially in revival services, are unfortunate, for they 
never lift their following out of the natural. They 
get no help from the divine. " If there be a willing 
mind, it is accepted of the Lord." These are unlike 
that deeply-rooted tree that David points out by that 
river of water, whose leaf does not wither and whose 
fruit is constant. When storms and reverses overtake 
such, they soon wither. These non-spiritual, non- 
reborn account for much of this low type of church 
membership in whom carnality is prominent. " They 
walk as men ; " in their views' they are migratory, 
" wandering stars, having no fixed dwelling place," — 
of the Athenian type, after something new. 

II. The different forms of life. We example them 
thus: 

1. The ant and the snail. 

2. The toad and the reptile. 

* 3. The animals and the birds. 

4. Man. 

In this list is seen the ascending scale in the varied 
forms of life. And the higher the form the larger the 
environment, with corresponding spheres of useful- 
ness. As seen, man has the highest form of life with 
the largest environment, coupled with the possibility 
of life eternal, with a sphere of usefulness that is 
unbounded. We become heirs and joint heirs with 
Christ, having angels as ministering spirits. What 
unspeakable gifts are ours through Christ! 

III. Degrees of generative life force. We see at 
times in the vegetable kingdom the life force so low 
that fruit will not mature. The same condition is often 
seen in the church. This condition is never satis- 
factory. To this Christ alludes, where he says: "The 
branch that beareth not fruit he taketh away." This 
class Paul calls babes, whom he fed. with milk. They 
were not in a state of fruitage. The husbandman has 
but feeble control of the fruitage of his vineyard, 
but the Christian has entire control of his fruit-bearing. 
This fact renders a fruitless state serious. 

IV. Each form of life has its own peculiar food. 
Our physical bodies are of the earth ; hence their 
nourishment must come from our mother earth. The 
heaven-born child must be fed upon heavenly manna. 
that alone will sustain its spiritual life. " Zion is their 
chief joy." The carnal trend is alone satisfied with 
amusements, the dance, the theater, the hall of mirth, ' 
etc. Our craving indicates our form of life. 

V. Some of the figures employed to represent the 
properties of life force. 

1. "Blessed is the man that endureth temptations: 
for when he is tried he shall receive a crown of life." 



Crozvn synlbolizes power; hence the newborn, the re- 
born, has the power of eternal life, and with this an 
eternal inheritance. 

2. " Blessed are they that do his commandments, 
that they may have right to the tree of life." Tree 
signifies the fruitage state of the Christian life. 

3. " And he shewed me a pure river of water of 
life." This text symbolizes the refreshing and in- 
vigorating influence of the Christian life. 

4. " He that followeth me shall not walk in dark- 
ness, but shall have the light of life." Here Christ 
points out the enlightening influence in the life of the 
followers of Christ. 

Covington, Ohio. 



IS SCIENCE A SUBSTITUTE FOR RELIGION? 
BY W. 1. T. HOOVER. 

Religious thought is the most prominent one of the 
present time. In the minds of many we are in the 
midst of a great crisis. A few hail the dawn of a 
brighter day when a supernatural religion will be super- 
seded by some more natural religion, if we must call 
it a religion. These generally regarcl the new era to 
be one qf science; hence science shall be (to them at 
least) the substitute for religion. Though Christianity 
is the ally and best friend of reason, it steadfastly 
refuses to allow its fundamentals to be adequately 
compressed by some philosophical system. " God 
might have given an answer to the many problems 
of life in words, but instead of this he lias done so 
in a Person." This is one of the most stupendous 
facts, and many a man refuses to accept this Person 
as anything more than a great religious teacher who 
through some fortunate trick or accident caught the 
popular ear of a superstitious and ignorant age. This 
so-called superstitious reverencing of a man and his 
teaching should not find a place among a cultured 
people in a scientific age. And so science, which is 
claimed to have solved all great questions, or at least 
shown the method of solution, has banished our slavish 
fears and become a substitute for the Christian religion. 

But all that science can do is to collect, classify and 
describe the facts and point out their empirical laws. 
It cannot so much as tell us there is a God, though 
Herbert Spencer says, " We are ever in presence of an 
infinite and eternal energy from which all things pro- 
ceed." What this energy is we cannot know, only 
that " it or he is formless, nameless, unknown, un- 
knowable." If this be true, why spend so much tinip 
and energy making positive assertions about the " un- 
known and unknowable"? Such barren logic-chop- 
ping cannot satisfy all honest, rational minds, for we 
long— 

" For a God whose face 
Is humanized to lineaments of love: 
Not one who, when my hand would clasp his robe, 
Slips as a flash of light from world to world. 
And fades from form to form, t l; en vanishes 
Back to the formless sense within my soul, 
Whicji evermore pursues and loses him." 

This sentiment or hope is gratified when Jesus 
Christ declares Spencer's " unknowable " to be the 
Christian's God and Father. 

Science cannot tell us what must be, but only what 
is; not what ought to be or we would like to have to be, 
but merely the already existing. The problem of evil 
rests with crushing weight upon us, and the best 
answer man alone can give is that taught by Buddha 
and Schopenhauer; " desire and ceaseless striving after 
the unattained should be crushed to death, and then 
freedom and rest would come." Herein is seen the 
supreme sweetness of Jesus' message; "Be of good 
cheer, I have overcome the world." So soon, then, 
as our problem of sin, sorrow, suffering, falls upon 
Jesus, hope and joy spring up' in the human heart. 

There can be no conflict between science and re- 
ligion, for both have the same author. The conflict 
is between men's opinions about science or religion, 
or both. The greater the effort to erase the religious 
consciousness from the race, the keener does it become 
and the deeper its hold upon us. So long as man 
continues to have a religious nature, that long will he 
demand that which will satisfy that nature. This 
nature will not rest with the mere discovery of em- 
pirical facts and laws and a hypostatizing of them, 



but demands that which alone can satisfy, namely, a 
Person. The only one who has never faltered in an- 
swering a social, political and moral question was 
Jesus of Nazareth. Every voice of the soul finds com- 
plete satisfaction in him, while all historic "isms" 
and popular fads of the present, echo in hollow 
mockery when appealed to for a balm for the hurt 
soul. To appeal to science (human interpretation and 
description of the origin, nature and process of the 
development of material facts) is to grovel in the 
dust of the desert where only a mirage of an oasis 
is seen and in the pursuit of the phantom to leave 
another soul to perish. In marked contrast, note the 
Christ who invites the weary burden-bearer to find 
rest in him, for he is able to save to the uttermost. 
His announcement, " 1 am the way. (he truth and the 
life." was never more timely than in this intensely 
materialistic age of counterfeits and substitutes. Let 
us exert every energy to keep the youth of our land 
from being drawn into the vortex of the popular 
delusion that science is the solution to the deepcr 
problems of life and as such has become the substitute 
for Christianity. 
Bridgeivater, Fa. 

FROM MINNEAPOLIS MISSION. 



Our Christmas exercises were held Wednesday even- 
ing following Cliristnias. The children showed much in- 
terest, and the house was filled with anxious parents. As 
this was otir first Christmas program in the city, wc cer- 
tainly feel that the influence from the children's work 
will be for the best. 

We arc very much encouraged with the present out- 
look of onr Sunday school. Average attendance last quar- 
ter was 41; average contributions, $1.40. Our Sunday 
school has been self-supporting from the first with a full 
treasury now. 

Sickness here, as in other cities, interferes with regular 
attendance. And wc arc not without occasional deaths 
among our number. These occasions help us to teach 
the children to look beyond the sorrows of life. 
.We also closed a two-weeks' series of meetings Dec. 9. 
Bro. Cakcricc conducted the services. We are grateful 
for his earnest efforts, and feel sure that many good im- 
pressions were made; (or some were ready to. make the 
good choice hut wait for companions. 

We trust faith fid brethren and sisters will keep in 
prayerful remembrance the little light that has so lately 
been placed in Minneapolis. Cora M. Bruhaker. 

1210 25th Ave. N., Jan. .1. 



KANSAS CITY, KANS. 

During the year 1906, T held two hundred and twenty- 
foup preaching services, assisted in eighty-seven prayer 
meetings, eighty- two cottage prayer meetings, seven ty- 
eight Sunday schools, forty-one Christian Workers' meet- 
ings, preached eleven funeral sermons, assisted in eight 
anointing services, three love leasts, made nine hundred 
and fifteen personal visits, and baptized twenty-seven. 

Wc arc starting into a new year with a united church 
and good attendance at our services. And we hope and 
pray for more and belter work in the future. All who have 
sent us donations, either in cash or clothing, we thank, 
and pray heaven's blessing upon the donors. 

In the last two weeks you have made it possible for 
us to buy coal, stoves, and groceries, and give aid to 
eleven widows and (heir children, besides much clothing 
and bedding. Our relief work is increasing and you can 
assist us in relieving much distress and sufFering. If those 
who send us clothing would place their individual name 
on the reverse side of the shipping tag, it would aid us 
materially in receipting for Hie goods sent. 



I. H. Crist. 



14 N. Ferrcc St., Jan. 10. 



THE HELPING HAND SOCIETY OF 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



The Helping Hand Society acknowledges the receipt of 
the following for quarter ending Dec. 31, 1906: 

Nokcsvillc church, Va.. $5 and a box of clothing and 
bedclothing; the Sisters' Missionary Circle, of Waynes- 
boro, Pa„ $1.75; Pipe Creek church, New Windsor. Md.. 
one package of clothing; Oakland church, Md., eight com- 
forts and several quilt squares; Sister Barbara Gish. $10; 
cash received for sold goods made by the Sewing So- 
ciety, $6.55. 

The Sewing Society, under the auspices of our Helping 
Hand Society, met nine limes with an average attendance 
of five; made sixteen articles, including one quilt. Several 
homes were visited by the members of the society. Gro- 
ceries, clothing and other articles were bought to the 
amount of $10.87, leaving a balance of $29.72. We extend 
our heartiest thanks to those who have kindly remembered 
our work in the past year. Psa. 41: I. 2. The blessings 
have been yours. Carrie Westergrcn. 

822 C. S. E.. 



J 



38 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 19, 190?. 



THE ROUND TABLE 



ANNIVERSARY OF THE CHURCH. 
BY LEVI ANDES. 

I feel like giving a good push to Bro. Brumbaugh's 
sentiments, relative to the " two hundredth birthday " 
of our church, on American soil. I, too, am deeply 
interested in the matter of taking advantage of this 
anniversary occasion not only to enlighten others, but 
our members as well, concerning the history, character 
and the doctrines of the Brethren church. 

I fear too many of us do not realize the blessings 
we enjoy at the cost of our forefathers, who labored 
and toiled faithfully for the Master. I mean such men 
as the Prices, Umsteads, Harleys, Foxes, Keysers, and 
a host of others whose graves I visited a few years 
ago, in Germantown, Pa., and elsewhere. No doubt 
some of them made mistakes in their zealousness for 
the Master; but they were npt so much to blame as 
we are to-day with our bright college intellect in this 
glorious land of freedom and liberty. 

I have lived a good part of my life in the old Key- 
stone State ; then some years in the Middle West, and 
the last twenty-two or more years in the south central 
part of the State of Kansas. I have taken a good 
many observations and find that we, with all of our 
advantages, are no better than were our faithful fathers 
of years ago. Let the whole Brotherhood go to work 
and hold a special memorial meeting, not only at the 
Annual Meeting in 1908, but in even' church and 
hamlet through the United States, on Whitsunday, 
1908. Let fervent prayers be offered for the success 
of the church. Let history be read and speeches made. 
Then gather the best of these, as soon as it can be 
done, and make a commemorative Gospel Messen- 
ger number for the churches, so all may have an 
opportunity to read it. and rejoice with all God's 
people throughout the land from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific. Surely the coming generations would have 
just cause to censure us if we neglect this " two hun- 
dredth anniversary " without suitable commemoration 
sendees. 

Furthermore, if we fail to make use of the excellent 
opportunity offered, we may some day, when it is too 
late, regret it. 
Newton, Kans. 



4. Work so hard during the week, that' you are so 
tired when Sunday comes, whether at home or church, 
that you must sleep. 

5. When the class should begin, wait for some one 
else to teach your class, if a teacher; or if a pupil, 
wait for another to ask and answer all the questions. 

6. Spend your time in thinking and planning for 
next week's work. 

7. When you do take part, occupy about twenty 
minutes in saying what ought to be said in two minutes. 

8. Be sure to bewail the low spiritual condition of 
the church, and especially the lifeless Sunday school. 

9. When the Sunday school is over, expect to 
speak to your brethren and the strangers at some other 
time and place. Go away as sad as from a funeral. 

10. Should you mention the Sunday school through 
the week, be sure to tell how few were there, and how 
dull it was. 

11. Should the above rules not produce the desired 
effect, stay away entirely, and thereby encourage all 
others to do so. 

12. The surest way to kill spiritual life in the 
church, is to kill all its pulsating life in any and all 
of its auxiliaries. 

Westminster, Md., Dec. ?o. 



each one to take pains to keep step. We can go along 
all in confusion and out of agreement of mind and 
feeling, but it is so hard and unpleasant and- makes 
us weary. Better give up our own peculiar way and 
keep step with our brethren and sisters. Look well 
to the faithful leader to make the pace. 
McPhcrson, Kans. 



HOW WILL WE EXCUSE OURSELVES? 

BY H. B. HOKST. 

How will we excuse ourselves in judgment? If 
all the heathen men of the world shall rise up, con- 
demn us and say, " You did know that we were made 
after the likeness of this great God, and that he had 
sent his only Son to save us. You let yourselves be 
led by a blind world to spend thousands of dollars to 
get your likenesses taken, which money you ought to 
have spent to let us know this great God and his 
saving Gospel." What excuse can you offer! 
Rexmont, Pa., Jan. ?. 



SUGGESTIONS TO MINISTERS. 
SELECTED BY EZRA FLORY. 

1. Let ministers beware of drifting into preaching 
of social topics and topics of the day, apart from the 
person and work of the Savior. 

2. Maintain the custom of expository and experi- 
mental preaching. 

3. Do not announce sensational subjects to draw 
congregations. 

4. Let us be strict to keep outside of the churches 
objectionable ways of raising money. 

5. Let us carefully maintain church discipline, and 
let people understand that if they want cards, balls, 
theaters, etc., they must dissociate themselves from our 
churches and be one thing or the other. If they feel 
able to serve Christ in these things let them stand or 
fall to their own Master, but let them do it apart 
from the church, lest they invalidate her testimony and 
impair her life. 

6. Have not too many paid officials in our church 
work, but train'the members for the various functions 
of church life. 

7. Avoid throwing on our evangelist, duties to 
which God has not called him. His work is not 
primarily with the church but with the world ; and he 
should not be called in till the church is in a healthy 
condition, and there is already a symptom of God's 
work through her upon the world. 

Union, Ohio. 



IN THE SHADOW OF THE SCAFFOLD. 
BY W-M. K. CONNER. 

Our city by the sea is but an infant. Yet she has 
lifted her hand and struck down a human being, and 
her dress is spattered with blood. One morning as 
the sun's rays fell upon the beautiful, silent waters of 
Hampton Roads, and streamed over the housetops of 
our city, a tragedy was taking place in the name of the 
law of man, which says, "Thou shalt kill." The trap 
was sprung and a colored man swung into eternity. 
He had killed his fellow-man. His life had been bad. 
When the scaffold began to loom up before him and 
eternity appeared on the other side, he felt he had 
nothing with him that would make it pleasant over 
there. He knew there was only one thing that would 
— the BIBLE. So he, a criminal, spent much time 
over the Book. It was his last opportunity, and if it 
availed not, he swung to everlasting misery. 

My mind ran back along the pathway of his life to 
the days of his youth. Had he remembered his Creator 
then, his life would have been good and he would 
doubtless be glorifying God to-day. Fathers, mothers, 
wdiere is the path leading to on which your boys are 
going? With the Bible in hand it cannot end " in the 
shadow of the scaffold." 
Newport News, Va., Dec. 26. 



THE VISIT. 

BY J. H. MILLER. 

Where do we find the Gospel for deacon brethren 
paying the annual visit ? I see in some churches the 
deacons are slow to administer the visit. Some have 
gone so far as to tell the elder that unless a scripture 
is found in support of this practice, they wish to be 
excused. Some think no one should pay the visit only 
the presiding elder. What will the Messenger say 
concerning the matter? 

W. Goshen, Ind. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TOPIC 



For Sunday Evening. January 27. 1907. 



ABRAHAM AS A MISSIONARY. 
Read Genesis 12: 1-5. 
Time, 2000 years before Christ. 
Home, Ur of Chaldees. 
Call of God. V. I. 

" Get out " from home. 
"Leave " kindred and all things. 
"Come" to land of God's choosing. 
The Promises of God. Vs. 2, 3. 
A great Nation. 
A great Name. 
A great Blessing. 
What is God's Call to Me To-day? 
Go ye, into all the world. Matt. 28: 19 
As the Father sent me, so send I you. John 20- 21 
My witnesses m Jerusalem, Judea, Samaria, uttermost 
parts. Acts 1: 8. 
Upon What Promises May I Rest in Heeding God's Call' 
you unto the end of the world. Matt. 



Lo, T am with 

28: 20. 
A hundredfold. 



Matt. 19: 29; Luke 18: 29, 30. 



HOW TO KILL SUNDAY SCHOOL INTEREST. 

BY W. E. ROOP. 

1. Talk about all its weak points in the past. 

2. Forget all about the next lesson till the hour 
arrives. 

3. Come fifteen 

door. 



I FAVOR THE SUGGESTION. 
BY JOHN R. SNYDER. 

I am much interested in Bro. Brumbaugh's sugges- 
tion as to the proper observance of the year 1908, as 
the bicentennial period of our church history. I 
was somewhat disappointed that the matter was passed 
so lightly by the Annual Conference two years ago. 
But I think there is time yet, if the matter is put in 
the proper light before the Brotherhood. The Con- 
ference of 1908 is likely to be held somewhere in 
the more populous sections of the church, and it should 
be made a season of especially commemorating the 
two hundredth anniversary of our founding. 

Cannot the matter be brought before the coming 
Conference and proper committees appointed, looking 
to the arrangement of a program suitable for the 
occasion? Let it be strongly pro-educational. We 
are not nearly so well known as we should be to have 
two centuries of history behind us. There is yet time 
to work up the matter if, we will but take it up properly. 
By all means let us have a bicentennial celebration. 
Not the spectacular, showy kind, but one that will 
show the world where we stand and what we stand for. 

Paris, III., Jan. 4. 



PRAYER MEETING 



For Week Beginning January 



minutes late and sit next to the 



KEEPING STEP. 
It is easy for two to walk together, if both keep 
step. But if the strides of one are long and the other 
short the walk is all mixed up, laborious and un- 
pleasant to both. In the church how good are the 
courtesies and thoughts for one another that cause 



WHAT THE WORLD NEEDS TO-DAY. 
Luke 4: 18. 

1. Christians that Seek to Uplift the Neglected Classes — 

lo preach the gospel to the poor" may not be a Treat 
thing as the world counts greatness, but it is the Lord's 
plan and command. " Hath not God chosen the poor 
of this world? James 2: S. Go to the cheerless hovel 
the drunkard s starving family and take to them Christ 
with all that the dear name implies. Reach down and 
litt up! 

2. The Christianity of Comfort.— We are told that we are 

to bind up the brokenhearted." There is a balm for 
stricken souls in the gospel message, and it is our 
privilege to take it to bleeding hearts. Prov. 12- 25 
Christ, the great physician, is ever willing to help. 

3. The Christianity that Gives Liberty to the Enslaved — 
We are fully authorized to " preach deliverance to the 
captives. Yes, we have them all about us,— poor weak 
erring ones in grievous bondage. 2 Tim. 2: 26. Satan 

. is a cruel taskmaster and there is danger in yielding 
to him as many have found to their sorrow when the 

Ex !-9 be " er th ' ngS haS hMn takcn away 

4 ' JSS Christianity of Light to Those in Darkness.— 
Ihe recovery of sight to the blind" is the special, 
blessed province of the Christian. " Ye are the light 
ot the world. It is our business to shine. Matt 5- 14 
In the midst of a crooked and perverse nation" we 
must hold forth as a bright torch, the Word of Life 
flulpp. 2: 15, 16. Ours should be a pathway of light 
giving to all who are near, visions of glory and a better 

5. The Christianity of Hope.—" The acceptable year of 
the Lord, will finally dawn to each waiting soul, 
there is a rainbow in the cloud of trouble " "for all 
who look up in hope. Truly, there is an " anchor to 
the soul that holds, yes absolutely holds, when the 
storms of life threaten to overwhelm us. Take the 
message of hope to others. It will transform and 
beautify their lives. Heb. 6: 19. 



• 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 19, 1907. 



39 



HOME AND FAMILY 

AN INTERVIEW WITH DEATH. 



BY JOSEPH PARKER. 

[The enclosed was sent me by a friend on the death of a 
loved one, as best expressing his sentiments. I think it so 
beautiful and consoling that I would like for many others 
to have it.— Flora E. Teague, Lordsburg, Cal.] 

I had an interview with death. 
The place, a lonely dell, winter-bound, swathed with spot- 
less snow. 
The time, new-risen morn: the last star falling 
As if in fear, retired but not extinguished. 
A spirit strengthened me to brave the enemy of life. 
And gave me courage to upbraid his cruelty. 
My speech I do remember well, and death's reply. 

Said T, in heightened tone, as if to keep uncertain 
Courage steadfast and ardent: "Monster, of thee 
No man speaks well: thy silent tread makes 
The house tremble, and in thy cold breath all 
Flowers die. No little child is safe from 
Thy all-withering touch: nor mothers 
Dost thou spare, nor lovers weaving life's story 
Into colored dreams, nor saints in lowly prayer. 
Why not content thyself with warring and succeeding 
In the gloomy jungle? — Smite the ti#er crouching 
For his prey, or the Hon in his fierceness, 
Or fly after the howling wolf, or lodge 
An arrow in the heart of the proud eagle. 
Why devastate our homes? Why kill our little ones? 
Why break our hearts and mock our thirst 
With brine of useless tears? O death! I would 
That thou wert dead." 

Then death answered me and filled me with amaze: 
"Believe me." said the weird defendant, "thy reasoning 
Is false, and thy reproach an unintelligent assault" 

His voice was gentle, and through all his pallor 
There gleamed the outlines of a smile. I saw 
Transfigured death! 

" I am God's servant. The flock must be brought home. 
I go to bring the wanderers to the fold. 
The Iambs are God's, not yours; or yours but to 
Watch and tend until he sends for them. 
Through your own fatherhood read God's heart. 
Through your own watching for the child's return 
Conceive the thought in love divine." 

He paused. Said I: "Could not some brighter 
Messenger he sent? An angel with sunlight in 
His eyes and music in his voice? Thou dost 
Affright us so, and make us die so oft in 
Dying mice. If our mother could but come: or some 
Kindred soul; or our old pastor whose voice 
We knew; any but thou, so cold, so grim!" 

" I understand thee well," said death, "but thou dost not 
Understand thyself. Why does God send this cold snow 
Before the spring? Why icebergs first, then daffodils? 
My grimness, too, thou dost not comprehend. 
The living have never seen me. Only the dying 
Can sec death. T am hut a mask. The angel thou 
Dost pine for is behind; sometimes angel-mother 
Sometimes father, sometimes a vanished love, 
But always to the good and true the very image- of the 
Christ. No more revile me. X am a visored friend." 

The dell was then transformed. The snow gleamed 
Like silver. The day a cloudless blue. And 
Suddenly living images filled the translucent space. 
And then r asked of death if he could tell me whence 
Came they. And he said: "These are mine. 
A reaper I, as well as shepherd. I put in the sharp sickle: 
I bound the sheaves: I garnered the precious harvest: 
And, when I come to the good angels, sing, ' Harvest 
home.' " 



.THE GIRL WHO DOES THINGS. 



BY MARTHA B. LAHMAN. 

It almost seems sometimes as though " the good 
old days " are passing away. In our day, with 
machinery for nearly everything, and prosperity on 
every hand, the all-around useful girl is seldom 
developed. 

Knitting, quilting, crocheting, and the like, are fast 
giving way to the finer but less useful arts, such as 
music, painting, etc. 

Scarcity of help is a serious problem to some, but 
to us who have daughters it may be a blessing in 
disguise. 

The Empress of Germany was shocked to learn that 
the daughters of wealthy Americans were not taught 
to work. And it is well known that Queen Victoria 
taught her girls to do things. 

In the rush and push for education our children are 
given such long and hard lessons that there really is 



no .time left for them to take the exercise they should. 
And, too, girls are expected to keep pace with the 
boys, though they are physically unqualified. 

The average girl has too much pride to drop behind, 
so her mother is often overworked, and the child 
must go untaught in some of the necessary accomplish- 
ments. 

The girl who can really do things is the one who 
can fry a beefsteak as well as she can play an accom- 
paniment on the piano, or one who can sit up with the 
sick just as easy as she can entertain company in the 
parlor. 

The girl that can play basket ball and tennis can 
wield a broom or a mop equally as well and will 
derive just as much benefit from the exercise. 

The normal girl's aspiration and ambition is to 
have a pleasant home and a good companion : but very 
often according to our present school system she must 
make a physical or nervous wreck of herself, thus 
disqualifying herself for the home duties, besides 
souring her disposition for congenial companionship. 

While we would have the girls to learn to do 
practical things, we would not have them neglect to 
cultivate the sentimental side of their natures. Some 
men say they do not admire sentimental women; but 
don't you believe it. A man or woman void of senti- 
ment will never become popular even among the most 
serious and sober-thinking people. 

And while we would not ignore the fine arts and 
accomplishments, we should have a deep veneration 
or respect, for the girl who has learned the art of 
doing things worth while; for she is the one whose 
very being vibrates with that beautiful word — useful- 
ness, and her life is in tune with the following sen- 
timent of Irving: 

" In America, literature and the finer arts must 
grow up side by side with the coarser plants of daily 
necessity." 

Franklin Grove, III. 



THE BEAUTIFUL BLUE DAYS. 



BY OMA KARN. 

Not far from the window where I write, a large 
force of Italians is working on some public improve- 
ment. As every one knows, the Italians are a musical 
people, and they use the gift freely by singing in 
their soft -Italian dialect while about their work. 

We noticed that they sang but two songs. The 
words were unintelligible, but on account of the cir- 
cumstances under which they were sung, we named 
them the happy song, and the grey song. If the day 
was bright, the machinery running smoothly, and the 
work proceeding rapidly, everybody was glad and the 
cheerful strains of the happy song came floating in. 
But let the day be dreary, the machinery acting as if 
it were about to go on a strike, the work going by 
jerks, and immediately through the gloom could be 
heard the doleful notes of the grey song. 

One day, recently, with one of these mournful songs 
sounding. I glanced out and noticed that work was 
at a standstill and the whole force in confusion because 
the derrick would not work. Something was wrong 
with one of the cables that helped to move it. 
Presently one of the workmen climbed aloft and with a 
large brush proceeded to bestow a liberal coat of oily 
substance upon the refractory cable. It was re- 
markable what effect that simple act had. In a few 
minutes the machinery was running smoothly, the 
men busily at work -again, and the cheerful strains 
of the happy song soaring up. 

'We all have them in our lives — these blue days 
when everything goes wrong, when the cable of love 
gets rusty and will not work, and we get out of touch 
with the Lord, and impatience, and fretfulness, and 
unjust actions make us and others suffer. 

Carlyle speaks of these days and calls them the 
beautiful " blue days." We can make them beautiful 
days if we will. If we will oil the rusty cable with 
patience and cheerfulness, keep our faith on the sunny 
side, and thereby keep in touch with God, it will 
cause our hearts to be so full of love and good will 
that it will find expression in kind, helpful acts that 



will brighten life for ourselves and others, be the day 
blue or bright. 
Covington, Ohio. 



SISTERS' SEWING CIRCLE, FRANKLIN GROVE, 
ILLINOIS. 



The sewing circle of the Franklin Grove church 
was reorganized with Sister Sallie Cupp, president: 
Sister Lydia Wingert, vice-president; and Sister Letha 
Blocher, secretary and treasurer. During the past 
year we held ten regular meetings and two called 
meetings, with an average attendance of thirteen. Our 
collections and donations were $24.66. We received 
$3.50 for quilting, and had two quilt tops donated to 
the society. We made one comfort for the Old Folks' 
Home in Mt. Morris; cut a large package of quilt 
blocks for the Minneapolis mission, also gave them 
eleven dollars in money ; sent five dollars to the Kansas 
City mission ; a sack of clothing to Chicago, containing 
about seventy-four pieces, and some new goods. We 
have a balance of $3.11 in the treasury. We do a 
good deal of donation work, make garments for the 
needy ones, piece and quilt quilts and sew carpet rags. 
We hope to do more during the present year. — Mollie 
Zarger, Sec, Franklin Grove, III., Jan. 3. 



SISTERS' AID SOCIETY, BEAVERTON, MICH. 



The sisters of this congregation organized an Aid 
Society, Jan. 16, 1905, with a membership of eight. 
During the past two years we have held a meeting the 
first Thursday of every month. We now have a mem- 
bership of thirteen, and an average attendance of nine. 
Our work consists in making quilts, comforts, aprons, 
clothespin aprons, etc. We received during the past 
two years, $54.93; donated $5 to our minister; gave 
$20 toward work done in the basement of our church- 
house, and $4.75 for a lamp in the church, and gave 
a donation to a family that had burned out. We met 
Jan. 3, 1907, and reorganized, with Sister Mash, presi- 
dent; Sister Whitmer, superintendent; and Sister 
Sargent, secretary and treasurer. — Emma Sargent, 
Beaverton, Mich., Jan. 4. 



SISTERS' SEWING CIRCLE. WATERLOO. IOWA. 



We report our work from Nov. 1, 1905, to Dec. 
31, 1906, at the beginning of which time wc had $32.88 
in the treasury. During the term's work we collected 
$76.86, of which $63.55 has been the work of our 
hands, and $13.31 consisted of fines and donations. 
Our expenses amounted to $4.25, and our donations 
were $105.72. We support an orphan in India, which 
requires $16; gave $10 toward the erection of the 
Brooklyn meetinghouse ; $79.72 to assist the home work 
in our church and city; sent a box of clothing to an 
unfortunate family in Missouri, who burned out; also 
several boxes to the Chicago mission. We believe 
many hearts have been made glad through our weak 
efforts. — Sarah Lichty, Pres. ; Eva S. Lichty, Treas. ; 
and Susie Eakler, Sec, Jan 4. 



GLENDORA, CALIFORNIA, SEWING CIRCLE. 

Report for year ending Nov. 14, 1906. Seventeen 
meetings were held. Total attendance, one hundred 
and sixty-five; average attendance, nine. At the be- 
ginning of the year we had $5.22 in the treasury: 
received $13.15 during the year; paid out $12.20, 
leaving a balance on hand of $7.60. A great many 
quilt blocks were pieced ; 9 comforters were knotted ; 
38 garments made; 7 garments donated; 6 comforters 
donated. — Sister D. H. Weaver, Pres.; Lavina 
Wagoner, Sec. 



The days of sickness, days of temptation, days of 
doubt, days of discouragement, days of bereavement 
and of the aching loneliness which comes when the 
strong voice is silent and the dear face is gone, these 
are the days when Christ sees most clearly the crown 
of our need upon our foreheads, and comes to serve 
us with his love. — Phillips Brooks, 



'<G 



fc» 



Mk 



40 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 19, 1907. 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER 

A RELIGIOUS WEEKLY 

PUBLISHED BY 

Brethren Publishing House 

Publishing Agent 

The General Missionary and Tract Committee, 

22 and 24 South State Street* Elgin, III. 



Bro. R. H. Nicodemus, of Potsdam, Ohio, lias 
changed his location and should be addressed at Sink- 
ing Springs, Highland county, same State, where he 
is now laboring under the direction of the mission 
board of Southern Ohio. 



SUBSCRIPTION, 



$1.50 PER ANNUM, IN ADVANCE 



O. L Miller, niinois. 


/ 


1 J. H. Moors, 






\ EJito: 


s Grant Mahan 




H. C £arly Virginia 




1 R. E Arnold 


BipfariM Manage! 



Bro. W. R. Miller writes us under date of Dec. 27. 
He and his party were then at Smyrna, having com 
pleted their work among the Seven Churches of Asia, 
being permitted to visit the scenes of all of them 
but two. They are having some interesting experiences 
in Asia Minor. 



B^All business and communications intended for the paper shouU 
be addressed to the BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE. ELGIN, h , t , 
\a& not to any individual connected with it 



Entered at the Post Office at Elein, 111., as Second-class Matter. 



A series of meetings was held at Victor, 
and five were added to the church. 



Kans 



A protracted meeting was held at White Oak, Pa., 
ami fourteen accessions are reported. 

Bro. W. I. Hall, of Virginia, changes his address 
from Gladys to Clarkton, R. D. 2, same State. 



Seven were added to the Farmers Grove church. 
Pa., during a revival conducted by Bro. Win. Miller. 



Bro. Geo. L. Stitdebaker closed his series of meet- 
ings in Lanark last Sunday evening. There were five 
accessions. 



Bro. Ezra Florv, of Union, Ohio, is to locate at 
Sterling, 111., and take pastoral charge of the work 
in that city. 

Five have made the good choice at Barron, Wis., 
where Bro. W. 1. Buckingham began a series of" 
meetings Dec. 23. 



Bro. Jos. W. Garrett, formerly of Mound City, 
Mo., should be addressed at 315 Massachusetts Ave., 
St. Joseph, Mo. His present address should have 
appeared in the Almanac, but no one advised us of the 
change of location. It would be a good thing if each 
minister, on changing his address, would notify'us at 
once, so as to enable us to note the change on the list. 

Sister Leah Eshelman Murray, widow of Eld. 
Samuel Murray, who died in Indianapolis, one year 
ago, passed away at Lanark, last week. Sister Murray 
has been in ill health for quite awhile, and her depar- 
ture releases her from much suffering. She was the 
mother of the foreman of our mailing department, 
Bro. S. E. Eshelman, and was in her 87th year. 

Bro. John H. Brumbaugh, of Brookville, Ohio, is 
very much pleased with our premium book, The Other 
Half of the Globe. He writes : " Miller's book will be 
a precious jewel in every home. When it came to my 
home I could hardly let it alone long enough to eat 
my meals until I knew its contents. And others that 
saw it became so interested that they were ready to 
subscribe for the Messenger. I bespeak a wonderful 
ingathering of subscribers and an ingathering of souls." 



Bro. Wm. La.mpin is engaged in a fine revival at 
the new church in Rossville, Ind. When last heard 
from twenty-one had applied for membership. 

Bro. George W. Miller, of Laplace, III., preached 
in Elgin last Sunday morning and evening. At present 
he is attending the Bethany Bible school, Chicago. 

During a protracted meeting in the West Conestoga 
church. Pa., held by Bro. Levi Mohler, nine were bap- 
tized and one restored to fellowship. 



Last Sunday afternoon the members at Batavia, 111., 
were called together, Brethren E. B. Hoff and Joseph 
Amick having charge of the services. At the elders' 
meeting last spring they were appointed to officiate 
in the ordination of Bro. James M. Moore. The 
church was duly consulted as is our custom, and Bro. 
Moore was set apart to the eldership by the laying on 
of hands. This completes the ordinations, in Northern 
Illinois, as arranged for by the elders at the last 
district meeting. 



Last Monday was a banner day for callers at the 
Messenger sanctum. Quite a delegation, headed bv 
Bro. J. H. Brubaker, of Virden, this State, the oldest 
man in the crowd, came out from Chicago, to pay 
their respects to the Publishing House. They are all 
attending the Bethany Bible school, some hailing from 
Southern Illinois, and one of them from North Dakota, 
Others also called on us. We are always glad to have 
Messenger readers call and see something of what 
we are doing. 

Bro. Moses Dierdorfp, of Yale, Iowa, has closed 
out his large mercantile business and is now in a 
position to give much time and attention to the work 
of the ministry. He is to make a visit to bis home 
folks in Pennsylvania, and while in the east may travel 
considerably among the churches. The Brethren in the 
eastern States will do well to make considerable Use 
of him. He knows how to interest, instruct and edify 
a congregation, and it affords us pleasure to know that 
his time in the future is to be devoted to preaching the 
Gospel. 

The Ram's Horn, one of the most interesting and 
spicy papers in America, has changed its' head but 
not its heart. It is hereafter to be known as the 
Home Herald, and while the journal is to be conducted 
on the same high plane as heretofore, we regret the 
cbange in name. The people of this country needed 
a Rain's Horn to do some vigorous pushing and some 
energetic butting in where other religious papers did 
not care to enter. As we view it, the paper does not 
teach the whole Gospel, but it teaches enough of it 
to make quite a rattling among the dry bones now and 
then. We may become accustomed to the new name 
by and by, but the keen way the editor has of saying 
things, from week to week, will constantly remind us 
of the Ram's Horn. 



Ti 



1 he Brethren in South St. Joseph, Mo., arc to 
close their revival meeting this week. They report a 
number of applicants for membership, with eighteen 
baptized. 

The Woodbury church, Baltimore, Md., recently 
enjoyed a season of refreshing. Eighteen applied for 
membership and were baptized, while two are yet to be 
baptized. 

Bro. Galen B. Rover is visiting several of the 
schools in the east for the purpose of delivering 
special talks. He spent a few days at Canton, Ohio" 
and then went to Huntingdon, Pa. 



One 



of our earnest and well-informed readers 
writes: "The Messencer was fine throughout 1906, 
but I think the first number of 1907 is most excellent. 
We certainly have a good beginning for the new year." 

The old meetinghouse in Grand-Valley, Colo., has 
proven too small for the steadily increasing congrega- 
tion, and now the building is being enlarged. This 
has become one of the most prosperous sections for 
the Brethren in the west. 



Bro. Samuel J. Burger held a revival in the 
Gravelton house. Turkey Creek congregation, Ind.. 
and ten came out on the Lord's side. Seven were 
baptized, and three await the administering of the 



In the "Home and Family Department," last week. 
Sister Marguerite Bixler was made to say that Christ 
was born in Nazareth. Her manuscript reads that he 
labored in that city. The mistake was made here in 
the office. 



One of our contributors writes that he is now pre- 
paring for the Messenger an article that has taken 
him sixteen years to get ready. During all these years, 
while writing scores of good communications for our 
columns, he has been thinking about this one article, 
but the subject did not strike him right until recently. 
Though thoroughly skilled as a writer he will probably 
go over his manuscript three or four times before 
mailing it to us. We mention this to show what care 
is exercised in preparing some of the matter which 
appears in the Messenger from week to week. 

While some of our preachers are to be commended 
for cutting themselves loose from business so they 
can devote their time and energies to preaching the 
Gospel, it will be well to bear in mind that in the 
work of the ministry the preacher cannot do it all, 
nor should he be expected to bear the entire burden 
alone. The laity must come to his assistance and 
stand good for its part. Whenever it becomes certain 
that the church is going to stand permanently by her 
preachers more of them will make the full surrender 
and dedicate their lives and all to the preaching of the 
Gospel. > 

It was not until last Monday that the minutes of 
the district meeting of Southern Indiana came to our 
notice. We observe that Bro. L. T. Holsinger is to 
represent the district on the Standing Committee, and 
that the following query, with answer attached, not 
heretofore published, is to be presented to the Los 
Angeles conference : 

We, the Mtincic congregation of the Southern District 
of Indiana, ask Annual Meeting through district meeting 
of 1906 to decide that hereafter elders in charge of con- 
gregations shall be elected for no longer period than three 
years at a time. 

_ Answer by District: We urge the change recommended ■ 
in the above query and advise all the churches to adopt 
it as soon as practical. Passed. Sent to Annual Meeting 



Bro. J. W. Lear did not go to California the be- 
ginning of the year, as was announced some weeks ago. 
He had sold out in Cerrogordo, III., and all necessary 
arrangements had been made for starting, but the 
members in and around that prosperous town made 
up their minds that they would not let him leave them 
if they could help it. They got their heads together 
and told Bro. Lear and his wife that they must remain 
and give their time and best efforts to the cause in 
that city and they would look after the rest. While 
we do not like to see the Pacific coast deprived of 
good workers, we are glad that Brother and Sister 
Lear are to remain in Southern Illinois. There is a 
big work for them to do in the community where they 
live. 

A lew days ago Bro. J. S. Flory, of Inglewood, 
Cal., buried his devoted wife, with whom he had lived 
nearly fifty years. Like her husband, she came from 
Virginia, and with him became a member of the 
Brethren church in 1858. One year later she was the 
wife of a young preacher, and proved a most helpful 
companion for him in his work. Sometimes, when he 
was away from home, holding protracted meetings, she 
would write him to stand by his work and do all the 
good he could and she would do the best she could 
caring for the children during his absence. From 
Virginia she went to Colorado and then to California, 
and thus much of her life was spent in the West. For 
months prior to her departure she suffered fnuch, but 
bore it all like a well-tried saint. 



Last Sunday we were with the Brethren at Batavia 
in their morning services. Nearly all the seats in the 
commodious little church were filled, and the best of 
attention was given to a sermon intended for the 
children. We. were especially impressed with the 
attendance at Sunday school, the secretary's report 
showing that the enrollment for the last few weeks 
was more than twice as large as the entire membership 
of the church. This is an unusual showing. Many 
churches have an attendance at Sunday school equal 
to their membership in numbers, but very few of them 
claim an attendance twice as large. But that is the 
showing that should be made in every congregation in 
the Brotherhood. If all the members, accompanied 
by their children, would attend Sunday school, this 
might be the encouraging condition everywhere among 



J 



Mnma&Z£m3*VS* 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 19, 1907. 



41 



MODERN CONVENIENCES. 
Tim time was, in this country, when people were 
content to live in log houses, using the loft for sleeping 
apartments. They could attend church in log build- 
ings, sit oil hard benches, without backs for support, 
depend upon tallow candles for lights and be content 
witli a big, blazing fire in the old-fashioned fireplace 
in oiie end of the building. Such people could listen 
to long sermons, sing- long hymns, endure' long 
prayers and thrive on one sermon a month. 

But that day is past. Most people are now living 
in good houses, and have them well furnished. Some 
of them have up-to-date heating plants, and every 
modern convenience they are able to procure. Men 
and women of this class must have places of worship 
solnewhat in keeping with their cozy and convenient 
homes. They may take pleasure in reading about the 
old log meetinghouse and the old-time services of 
two hours or more, but they do not want to worship 
that way. The meetinghouse must be as nice as their 
homes, and it must be well heated, well ventilated and 
. properly lighted. There must be a stand for the 
preacher and sometimes carpet in the aisles. If there 
is an electric plant convenient the whole building must 
be lighted by electricity. People of this make-up, 
however pious, are not going to listen to many ser- 
mons one hour in length, nor do they care for. long 
hymns and long prayers. 

There is a change from the log houses to the up-to- 
- date conveniences with a new class of people. It is 
not a question as to which is the better way of wor- 
shiping God. Our fathers dealt with the former 
conditions, while we are up against the latter. The 
conditions are here, and we must accept them and 
make the best possible use of them. And since we 
must have better accommodations in connection with 
our services, the only thing to do is to get our heads 
together and help direct all these conveniences to the 
honor and glory of God. 

The men and women who have pleasant homes 
naturally want it pleasant in church, where they 
worship, and where the congregation is largely made 
up of that class of people, we see no just reasons why 
the desired accommodations may not be had. Con- 
sidering the times in which we live, they are lawful, 
and we all know that they are very desirable. Fifty 
years ago they might have been considered extrava-- 
gant, but not so now in most communities, 

Our policy should be to keep pur places of worship 
on a plane with our manner of living, avoiding ex- 
travagance and mere display. God's people should 
be a plain people, living simple lives. This they can 
do while enjoying all the modern conveniences within 
their reach. But they need to guard against the super- 
ficial and extravagant, not only in their homes but in 
their churches as well. We should not waste the 
Lord's money, nor should we become so wedded to 
our improved conditions that we cannot make some 
sacrifice for (he cause we represent. 

We believe in convenience and comforts in the home 
as well as at the church, but there is danger of our 
reaching a point in life when we will be found so 
much at ease in Zion as to be of but little practical 
value to the Lord or his cause. Between the log 
houses of our parents and an easy resting place in 
Zion there should be a stopping point somewhere. We 
cannot go back to the log cabins, and surely we have, 
no use for the easy life that renders us good for 
nothing. The happy medium is somewhere between. 
Let us find it, and on this plane of living worship God 
as faithful and earnest children should worship, serve 
and obev him. 



HOW GREAT THINGS THE LORD HAS DONE 
FOR US. 
At the Bristol Conference a query asked for the 
appointment of a Committee to prepare a program for 
1908 for a recognition of what God has done for us 
in the last two hundred years. The answer was: 
" Considered that this request is answered by reference 
to Deuteronomy 32." A long answer, for there' are 
fifty-two verses in the chapter, forty-three of which 
are taken up with a song of Moses and Hoshea, spoken 
to all the children of Israel, telling in part what God 
had done for them and warning them not to forget him, 



The words that fit the query best are found in verses 
7-10; " Remember the days of old, consider the years 
of many generations : ask thy father, and he will show 
thee; thy elders, and they will tell thee. When the 
Most High divided to the nations their inheritance, 
when he separated the sons of Adam, he set the bounds 
of the people according to the number of the children 
of Israel. For the Lord's portion is his people ; Jacob 
is the lot of his inheritance. He found him in a desert 
land, and iri the waste howling wilderness ; he led him 
about, he instructed him, he kept him as the apple of 
his eye." 

These words of Divine inspiration, found in the 
answer to the query, show that while the Conference 
did not deem it necessary to appoint a program com- 
mittee, yet it was it! sympathy with the spirit of the 
query. And right it was, for God's people were com- 
manded many times to tell what great things the Lord 
had done for them. At their feasts and anniversaries 
they were commanded to tell to the children and the 
stranger within their gates how the Lord wrought 
their great deliverance from Egyptian bondage. 

With many of our Brethren, we believe it would be 
fitting and profitable for us to tell how the Lord 
brought our fathers out of Germany when the hand of 
persecution was laid heavily upon them and led them 
into this fair land where he gave us a habitation, and 
where the church has grown and prospered even unto 
this day. It would be a review of two centuries of 
our church history and church work. One time is as 
good as another to thank God and give him praise, but 
1908 is especially fitting, for it marks the two hun- 
dredth anniversary of the closer organization of the 
church, It would be well for all concerned, we believe, 
if we were to hold a special service at our Conference 
next year to speak about what God has done for us, 
telling it to our young men and women and the 
strangers who may come within our gates. 

Having in view the honor and glory of God, and the 
benefits to us as his children, the following possible 
line of service for the Conference of 1908 is submitted 
to our readers. The Annual Meeting for that year 
should be as centrally located as possible in the 
Brotherhood, and at a place easy of access so that the 
very greatest possible number of members might be 
able to attend and enjoy the services. Of course this 
particular point should receive consideration by the 
Californian Conference in locating the meeting for 
1908. 

Speakers might be selected to give addresses on our 
church history, and church growth and development. 
The services could extend over Saturday, Sunday and 
Monday ; opening say on Friday evening with a service 
devoted to fasting and prayer, asking God to help us 
in the great work of converting souls to Christ. If 
this meeting should continue until midnight it might 
be all the better. 

After this the sessions should be so divided as to 
give the best possible results. The Brethren selected 
to tell, the story of God's dealings with the church 
should be ready and well prepared for their work. 
The Sunday morning service could be given to the 
story of the church in Germany, the emigration to 
America and how graciously God dealt with our 
fathers in the New World. The afternoon, bio- 
graphical sketches of some of our leaders who have 
gone to their rest ; and in the evening the Lord's 
work through the church in the nineteenth century 
might be given. 

On Monday, the Sunday-school movement among 
us, the missionary work and the educational interest 
of the church should receive attention. At some time 
during the meeting a session might profitably be de- 
voted to the growth and development of our publishing 
interest, beginning with our first paper in 1851 up 
to the present. The element of boasting should be 
left out of all the services and only God's honor kept 
in view. 

The special meetings or services should close on 
Monday evening with a praise and thanksgiving meet- 
ing, with short talks and prayers in which our hearts 
could overflow in thankfulness to God for his goodness 
to his people. 

Arrangements should be made to write all these 
addresses in a book, so that our young men and women 



our boys and girls might have access to it, and thus 
learn how great things God has done for us. 

The meeting would be incomplete without a special 
Thanksoffering to the good Lord for his goodness 
unto us. This should be a special, free-will offering to 
mark the bicentennial of our church, and it should not 
be less than one hundred thousand dollars. We should 
realize that there was no thanksgiving in Bible times 
without a thankofTering. We could do no better than 
give a hundred thousand dollars of God's rich bounty 
so lavishly bestowed on us for the spread of the 
Gospel of his Son. 

Brethren, let us carefully and prayerfully consider 
these suggestions, improve on them so that we may 
have the very best, and then come together in 1908, 
after fasting and prayer, and tell all the men what 
great things the Lord has done for us. d. l. m 



IN DREAMLAND. 

One of the' peculiar phenomena connected with 
human life is our dreams. There are evidently causes 
back of them. But just what those causes are, how 
they operate and what puts them into action, has 
puzzled the minds of the wisest of men in all ages. 
Whether dreams come as a result of an overloaded 
stomach, a general physical disorganization, a dis- 
turbed mind or a quickened conscience, who can tell? 
We don't know. All we do know is we all have our 
dreams. At times, more; at times, less. Some 
pleasant, others unpleasant. 

At times they seem to be orderly and connective. 
At other times they come in disjointed sections of dis- . 
jointed things and in miscellaneous editions. And yet, 
after all, the odd mixtures that seem to come to us in 
our dreams we think we may adduce from this general 
rule: When we lie down to sleep with our minds filled 
with peaceful and pleasant things, our dreams are 
somewhat similar in character. An embittered mind 
and guilty conscience seldom give pleasant dreams. 

But even this indefinite rule has its exceptions, as 
the last things about which you are thinking before 
going asleep don't always turn up in the dreams that 
follow, but often there come to us impressions and 
conditions made months and years' before. 

( In the evening before the new year came in we had 
a season alone, which was given to special thought 
and meditation, partly in retrospect and partly in pros- 
pect or in the forward look. Soon after retiring the 
incidents that generally accompany the departure of 
the old year and the ushering in of the new began, and 
our peaceful slumbers were disturbed, and we were 
reminded of the fact that another year had ended and 
a new period of time had begun. With the attendant 
thoughts we lost consciousness and entered into 
" dreamland," there to pass through experiences that 
were pleasant, entertaining and strange. 

Our first visit was to the old homestead, where we 
enjoyed the presence of father, mother and an un- 
broken family. And, what seemed strange about it 
was, we were conscious of part of the family being 
dead, and the question came to us, How can this be? 
Is it indeed a reality or is it only a dream? But before 
determining an answer to our own question, the whole 
scene had passed away, and we found ourself on a tour 
in a strange land. The place was beautiful, our com- 
panions desirable and entertaining, but we were there 
without a purpose, — without any knowledge of getting 
there, or of any destination ahead. It was an ex- 
perience that was unnatural and bewildering. A 
purposeless being — a puiposeless life. Was this indeed 
dreamland ? And while trying to get our bearings we 
passed into another dream, and another, each one being 
so different from the other that there seemed to be no 
relation whatever between them. This seemed to be 
ah unsolvable puzzle. And in our effort to get a solu- 
tion we awakened. And again came the question, 
Were all these different experiences that played so 
vividly in our being dreams, or am I now in a dream? 
Indeed there are times when we are made to do 
some solid thinking to determine the difference between 
our awake dreams and our sleeping dreams, as, at 
times, we have both kinds, and the one is about as 
rational as the other. How often do we hear of per- 
sons, in giving some of their experiences, say: " It all 



$ 



MM 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.-January 19. 1907. 



seems as a dream." A few years ago a brother, in 

telling about bis efforts "to get rich quick," said: 

" As I look back over my actions and speculations the 

whole thing seems to be a dream." And, in a sense, 

it was. He was a man of intelligence and good 

business tact. And yet with his physical eyes open 

he foolishly speculated away his whole belongings, 

which were quite ample. Like the apostle Paul, he 

could say: " Whether I was in the body or out of the 

body, I cannot tell." The difference between the two 

was, the one had his mind plunged out of the body into 

the world, while the other had his mind fixed on things 

above. They were both in dreamland. The one was 

dreaming about getting riches in this life, the other 

about getting riches in the life to come. And why 

this difference ? The answer to this question is easily 

found. Where a mans treasures are, there will his 

heart— his mind be. And our dreams, though mixed 

on the whole are often our minds, our thoughts. We 

dream while sleeping. And we are asleep to things 

when correspondence ceases, when there is no response 

one to the other. 

We are asleep in sin when there is no correspond- 
ence between us and our God. When he calls we fail 
to respond. We are living in the dreamland of sin. 
And our dreams and actions are in harmony with the 
elements in which we have placed ourselves. Sweet 
water cannot flow from a bitter fountain, neither can 
grapes grow from brambles. Through sin the world 
has gone to sleep to God. And as long as it remains 
in this condition it continues to be in the dreamland of 
sin. And because of the danger of this condition, and 
because God loves us and wants us to get out of it 
he calls, through his Word and Spirit: "Awake, thou' 
that sleepest, arise from the dead, and Christ will o-ive 
thee light 1 " 

That we have a world of people in the dreamland 
of sin is evident from the dreams that they are having 
and show by their mode of living. Men and women 
are so wedded to the world and worldly things, and 
their hearts so set upon them, that they can scarcely 
talk and think about anything else. They think and 
talk about it during the day and act it out in dreams 
during the night. Even those who have had a taste 
of the bitter and sweet things of life, because of 
worldly success, have allowed themselves to be over- 
powered through the deceitfulness of riches and have 
agam fallen into the sleep of sin and are being filled 
and satisfied with the husks that even swine refuse to 
eat. What do you think about it? Will you choose 
the dreamland of sin and the world, or that of 
righteousness and everlasting joy? You can choose 
now, and with it your die is cast. „ „ „ 



chddren the Word of truth. We do not mean that the 
Sunday-school workers should break with those who 
oppose their efforts. They should go forward with 
their efforts, being at all times as wise as serpents and 
as harmless as doves. 



HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONS. 



, general and for- 



VVhat is the difference between horn 
eign missions? 

We may make a difference, but the New Testament 
knows no such distinction. At one time the Master 
instructed his disciples to go, not into the way of the 
Gent.les, but to limit their efforts to the lost sheep of 
the house of Israel. This, however, was wholly set 
aside when he gave them the great commission tell- 
ing them to " Go into all the world, and preach my 
Gospel to every creature." It is under this last com- 
mission that the church of to-day is laboring. It is 
the duty of the church to see to it that the Gospel is 
carried to all parts of the world, to those who reside 
in our own country as well as to those who live in 
heathen lands. The apostles and others, in their day 
made no special difference in the mission fields They 
went everywhere preaching the Gospel. Though when 
entering some of the fields they first sought out their 
own countrymen, the Jews, and made known to them 
the truth they had for all the world, yet, as a matter 
of importance, they recognized no difference, neither 
should we. On account of the heathen being wholly 
neglected, some of our people, along with others, may 
seem to be more zealous about foreign missions than 
home missions. As we view it, this is not necessary 
and we are sure that it is not apostolic. The better 
way is to feel as much concerned about preachino- the 
Gospel to the one class as to the other. For conven- 
ience the money contributed for mission work may 
very properly be kept separately, but in principle the 
giving of money for preaching the Gospel is all the 
same as well as is the principle pertaining to home 
and foreign work. 



OPPOSING THE SUNDAY SCHOOL. 
We have a report from a locality where the Sunday- 
school workers have a hard time keeping up the 
interest of their school. Some of the members in that 
particular locality are opposed to Sunday schools and 
instead of encouraging the work in their neighborhood, 
do what they can to throw obstacles in the way 

crT iT T !' ad 3 fCW co "g re g*tions that were 
opposed to Sunday schools, but we thought the las. 
one had undergone a change of heart. But this appears 
not to be the case with the particular section to which 
we now refer. I, seems strange indeed in this en- 
lightened age that any one should stand out against 
and oppose the Sunday-school interest. If they do 

?£"£ tHey 5h ° UM kn ° W ' hat the Smd V ^ool 
s to-day the nursery of the church, and that to give up 

this hne of work would be to sound the deal kne 1 
see th luT Cr " latCr - The A ""-> Meeting 

Tnd t t the - diStrict COnf< — s ^erstand it § 
and t ,s strange indeed that the members in some 
localities cannot grasp the situation. But what shTl 
he Sunday-school workers do in localities where ther 
■s strong opposition? Shall they close their Sunday 
school work? Most assuredly not. They should moe 
forward prudently, however, knowing that the Annul 
Meeting, their District Meeting, reason, exp nence and 

tha i Thfr, 3 " °" tHeir Skk ' W e f«l positiv 
that f the school work is wisely carried on, the Holy 
Ghost ,s with the workers to encourage, strengthen 
-d quicken them in their arduous efforts to teach e 



SUPPORTING THf7i^eR^st7oF THE CHURCH. 

Those who- do mission work for the church and 
also receive their support from the church, should 
not be constantly criticising and finding fault with the 
churcn and her work. I, is their duty to stand by 
he church and her enterprise, and do what they can 
to advance her interest. If connected with the church 
here are some things not in keeping with their way of 
thmkmg, they should know that we have councils and 
conferences where matters of the sort may be dis- 
cussed and remedied if deemed wise to do so. To find 
fault with the church one hour and then receive money 
for support the next does not seem consistent Such 
parties should also throw their influence on the side 
of the various lines of work carried on by the church. 
They should introduce her Sunday-school literature 
m their Sunday schools and in various ways show a 
preference for that which is under the control of the 
worker t , k to he church for h . s support Md th ^ 
urge hs Sunday school to send to another denomination 
for rts literature. If the church is to furnish the money 

ouZU°\ mhS 'T W ° rk 3t a Certain missi0 " Point 
it ought to be understood that her literature should be 
use at that point This is reasonable, and it is con- 
, cM ^'''^""V^t thing to do. Should 
he Mission Board be asked to furnish money to help 
build a meetinghouse in a locality, where the member' 

b X' n d " Se ° f Sunda ^ h °°> ^rature furnished 
b3 othe denominations, teaching the doctrines of other 
persuasions Can the Board afford to furnish money 
to help build up the interest of other denominations? 

furn sh r -' ^ N ° r ° an thC <*""* aff °"l to 
furnish the support for workers who will not faithfully 
represent the interest of the church in every par tic , r 



tune when Christianity had to face the Koran and 
the Mohammedan sword, but that day is past. The 
followers of Mohammed can no more depend upon 
the sword It is now the Bible against the Koran, 
and also the Bible against the sacred books of India 
It is not a carnal question to be settled by the force 
of arms, but a religious one, to be settled by the Word 
of God and the writings of others. The Christian 
welcomes the conflict, for he believes there is power 
behind the written Word, and with this Word is willing 
to face all other religious claims of earth. The struck 
is on and the world is watching the outcome. With 
he Lible, the missionaries are entering all lands. In 
India they have a strong hold and in time the whole 
country will be won. They are entering China in force 
and are also making their way to the center of Africa 
In the near future the Bible and the Koran are to 
measure strength all over Turkey, the seat of Moham- 
medanism. The awakening has come and before the 
end of the present generation the world is going to 
witness some marvelous changes. When the Holy 
Ghost ,s behind the Word there can be but one result 
and that is the conquering of the world for Christ. ' 

THE DISCOVERY OFJWBI^N MANUSCRIPTS. 
While examining some sheets of parchment bought 
at Cairo for Coptic manuscripts, Carl Schmidt made 
a discovery of much importance to philology and 
history. The repetition of the word "Uru," which 
among modern Nubians means king, convinced the 
German savant, who is an authority on Coptic and 
he early Christian archeology of Upper Egypt, that 
the text was Nubian, a language which, although still 
spoken ,s no longer written. The manuscripts date 
from the eighth century A. D., and are translations 
of Christian works in which frequent references to St 
Paul are made. One manuscript is a collection of 
extracts from the New Testament, and the other a 
hymn of the cross. The Greek original of the hymn 
is not known When the documents are deciphered. 
philological science will be enriched by the knowledge 
of the language spoken by .the people of Nubia before 
the invasion of Semitic tribes, and the mysterious in- 
scriptions on many of the Egyptian monuments may 
be read.— Scientific America,,. J 

THE SUNDAY SCHOOL ARMY. 

2«£SSST*S t0 '!* ™*^»W« -ports there are 
262,000 Sunday schools in the world, with a total en- 
rollment of 26,000,000 pupils. This means that a vast 
army, mostly young people and children, are engaged 
m the study of the Scriptures, Sunday after Sunday 
Who can estimate the amount of good done by these 
schools, and the army of workers connected with them? 
Think for a moment of the vast "Sunday-school 
Army numbering 26,000,000! But even this is not 
what it should be. The Sunday-school army shouM 
mber not less than one billion. We are doing much, 
but there is still more that should be done. 



A RELIGIOUS CONFLICT. 

There is a wonderful religious awakening in India 
and other mission countries. I„ these | e '™ 

ohammedan influence must be met. Then theTe 
the Hindoo parties and even others. There was a 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER. 
*a 'ofllTl'^fi- eftfil" »?<?'•„"■ »">»=>»<. in 

FiTovri'ssr 5 - ■»» ~ u y ro = h i s* sums -sb* 

o( I wo"r sm p ea a r n n I^ I r y ac P , 1 S a5 f ° r " ™ ,ur " *° «• <">osto,ie order 

It holds that the Bihle la ., ^i. ■ , . 
recognizes the Ne«- Testament as the ' ?ll"ftl"i?,,,? 00lt ' <">"• 
faith and practice for the people of God ""fallible rule of 

reJ- , ar a dra , nd M p S u „'i,„ l i 1 e eS«„ r „", e e^ ','"' •™" lt ^ teaches- future 
a pure, holy S%S$ggh&?*$gZTlJtj£°°^™°< 

"att^ r , t£S££ ! - MM "■ «■ • «■*- co m - 

£e^i~ & - , -™?^o?^„ 1 -rs te ^ 

%'&"$£ "'-^'"'"-• tl «no a , r e e ilK ra 7 J , e»s U s hC Ch S r? , t ,tMa 

c„Ks\^^^™ i , , ,„ n t ° ls t 'e?seT,',il & P ? „«& *W 
Christian piety essential to true holiness and 

w.fh^^^'S,^ K^SS' d, " y <" S °'»'W'th 5 e ,1c 

ties f^K'^J^Z^ ^S'aK SSftT 3 the A »™- 
theorles and discords of ,„,, i "„ ",',| S , V .* c O" fl| ctimr 

ssiSS ^'a^ A ™'^t^ >ss s 

Brettu-en Publishing; House, Elsin, 111. 



!<*»vw 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 19, 1907. 



43 



General Missionary and Tract Department 



D. t. MUler, 
£. W. Teeter, 



OOMMIf TttB- 

Illinois I H. C. Early, - 
Indiana I C. D. Bon sack, 
John Zuck, Iowa. 



Virginia 
- D. C. 



Address all fo a sinew to 
General Missionary ond Tract Committee, Elgin, HI. 



A GOOD WORK BY MONKS. 



A writer some time ago called attention to the way in 
which the monks dealt with the Indians in the southwest- 
ern part of the United States in an early day. Several 
Spaniards had visited what is now California, and gave 
places the names by which we know them to-day. As early 
at 1539 a Franciscan monk was where San Diego now 
stands. But actual possession was not taken until two 
hundred and thirty years later. At that time another Fran- 
ciscan monk was sent up from Mexico City to establish 
missions for the conversion of the Indians. A mission was 
planted at the time when the country was taken posses- 
sion of for Spain. 

At first there was trouble with the Indians, but the 
monks soon won their confidence and converted them to 
the Roman Catholic faith. These religious teachers had 
patience and tact; they treated the Indians kindly. Fa- 
ther Serra was the name of this first worker. When he had 
established the work at San Diego he gradually moved up 
the coast, planting a chain of missions one day's march 
apart, and teaching the Indians how to farm and raise 
fruits and vegetables and make their labor profitable. His 
interest was in the people, ignorant and cruel as they 
were. He knew that the Christ came and died for them as 
well as for himself. 

"He was a very remarkable man, and I wonder that he 
has not been made a saint. I do not know of any other 
missionary in any part of the earth — Catholic or Protest- 
ant — who accomplished more practical good for his fel- 
low-creatures; and his heroism, his usefulness, his self- 
sacrifice, his piety, and his public services for the church 
and humanity certainly entitle him to canonization. He 
exercised more influence in his day than any other man on 
the Pacific coast. He established not less than fifteen mis- 
sions, and caused the Indians of California to be called 
Mission Indians. He introduced irrigation and was the 
first farmer in this part of the country. He introduced 
sheep and cattle, olives and oranges; he not only convert- 
ed the savages to the faith of Rome, but made them a 
peaceful, industrious, prosperous people." 

It was only sixty-five years from the time he went there 
until the missions were abolished by the Mexican Repub- 
lic; for Snain had in these years lost Mexico and Califor- 
nia. 'But in those years a wonderful work was accom- 
plished. Father Serra and his successors baptized 6,638 
Indians. And the teaching continued along practical lines 
all the time. The records show that the trades were 
taught, and there were farmers, herders, horsetamers, sad- 
dlers, blacksmiths, millers, carpenters, bakers, silversmiths, 
coopers, candle-makers, wine-makers, shoemakers, hat- 
ters, guitar-makers, ropemakers, painters, masons, stone- 
cutters, musicians, soapmakers, tanners, tilemakers, weav- 
ers, fishermen, barbers, basket-makers, wood-carvers, pot- 
ters, and those engaged in other civilized occupations. 

Some of the" finer arts taught by these monks remain 
to this day. The Indians derive quite a revenue from 
the sale of their baskets, lace and drawn work, leather 
work, and embroidery in gold and silver thread. But the 
Mexican Republic was not as generous in its treatment of 
the missions as Spain had been. The missions had become 
wealthy, the records showing that there were seven hun- 
dred thousand cattle, sixty thousand horses, several mil- 
lion sheep and a large number of domestic animals grazing 
on mission pastures at the time the monasteries were 
suppressed by Mexico. The income of the missions was 
two million dollars. Practically all of this property was 
wasted or destroyed or stolen. It was a sad story of 
avaricious authorities destroying 1 what had been so care- 
fully built up. 

We cannot approve of all that was taught by the monks; 
but it must be admitted by all that they were wise in their 
day and veneration. They developed the better side of 
the Indians instead of arousing their passions and making 
them hate and seek to drive out the whites. We do not 
know, we never can know in this world, what would have 
been the result if the Indians in the eastern part of the 
United States had been dealt with as were those on the 
Pacific coast; but we believe the record would have been 
a very different one. There would have been no King 
Philip's war, no Wyoming massacre, no lone years of 
strife and bloodshed in which the innocent and helpless 
suffered because men who professed to follow the Prince 
pf Peace refused to obey his teaching. The record of 



those years is made up; it cannot be changed. But men 
of to-day may profit by it. That is the main good of his- 
tory; and if one generation does not seek to avoid the mis- 
takes of those which have preceded it, there is little chance 
for progress. And so the church to-day, by seeking the 
best way to teach the unconverted, will follow that which 
has brought good results and reject that which has 
led to failure. Thus will the borders of the kingdom be 
enlarged. May we be led to choose the best method. 

C. M. 

<§• <S> <^ 
FROM NORTH ST. JOSEPH, MISSOURI. 



Our evergreen Sunday school has prospered during the 
past quarter. Our average attendance was forty-seven 
and our average collection $1.32. This is quite an in- 
crease over last quarter. This has been brought about 
largely through the efforts of Sister Streeter. Last Sunday 
one of the little girls united with the church. 

We are glad our brethren and sisters are continually 
remembering the needy here by donations of clothing and 
money. We are distributing these where they are most 
needed. We pray the Lord to remember those who so 
liberally contributed to his work. We are a self-support- 
ing church, that is, none of the contributions sent in here 
are needed for minister's salary, rent, or current expenses. 
However, we have unlimited possibilities for missionary 
work. This missionary effort is being extended and en- 
larged as fast as the supplies received will warrant. All 
contributions sent to us are applied directly to work for 
the needy. 

We celebrated Christmas at our Sunday school by giv- 
ing. Everybody gave something. We took up a special 
missionary collection amounting to $4.56. Part of this was 
used to give our children a treat, and the balance went 
into the mission fund. Nothing had been said .iboiit any 
treat in public, so it came to them as a pleasant surprise. 

We expect Bro. Murray to be with us again in a few 
days. Though we have had many encouraging letters from 
him, we are anxious to have him back among us and give 
us some of his good talks. 

Bro. Leedy has located -here and preached us many 
sermons of the good, old-fashioned kind. He has been 
a .'xiiX e ,L n keepingup Bro. Murrav's work in his absence. 
Bro. Streeter assists him much as his strength will allow. 

We feel that God in his own mysterious way is shaping 
his work with a powerful unseen hand. At various times 
he has seen fit to bring about conditions little short of 
providential which shows us how he has not forsaken his 
own. 

My term as superintendent is about expired, and as I 
look back over the work done by this Sunday school I 
feel like congratulating the members on the good work 
done and the unity of spirit and purpose. At first we 
hunted teachers for the classes, but now we are hunting 
classes for those who will teach, even though the total 
number of scholars enrolled has increased from forty-five 
to seventy. We feel truly grateful for the encouragement 
given us by our friends. Please send donations of money 
to Mrs. Mary C. Stouffer, 616 S. HtlrSt, and clothing to 
Mrs. C. Deal, 2001 Savannah Ave. W. H. Senger. 

St. Joseph, Mo., Jan, 3. 

® <S> <8> 
FROM CUBA. 



The Omaja Sunday school met in quarterly review to- 
day, with an attendance of fifty. Quite an interest was 
manifested. The quarterly report showed an increase in 
attendance of from an average of twenty-three, the first 
and second quarters' work in Cuba, to an average of thir- 
ty-five this last quarter of 1906. We are encouraged to 
press on with more zeal and courage. The reorganization 
resulted in the old officers being reelected,^Bro. G. W. 
Srtell superintendent and Miss Mable Strawn secretary. 

We remembered our national Thanksgiving day by meet- 
ing together at 10:30 in a Thanksgiving service, conducted 
by Bro. Kreider. A bountiful dinner was enjoyed by all at 
the noon hour, after which an appropriate program was 
rendered by the day school, under the instruction of Mrs. 
Strawn, the teacher. There were about eighty in attend- 
ance, and all seemed to enioy all the services very much. 

Christmas passed with the usual good cheer and "peace 
on earth, good will toward men." Bro. Snell conducted 
the Christmas services, which were well attended. 

Thus another year with its blessings is gone into eter- 
nity, and we are made to wonder what will be the record 
of our labors. Have we as a people, and as individuals, 
done all we could for the sake of our blessed Master? 
May each one of us resolve to do " More and better work 
for Jesus " in the year 1907. May heaven's choicest bless- 
ings attend all the dear brethren and sisters in all lands. 
Remember us at the throne of grace. 

Emma B. Kreider. 

Omaja. Cuba, Dec. 30. 

<S> <S> <3> 

MISSIONARY COMMITTEE OF MIDDLE IOWA. 



About Jan. 20, Bro. Hood goes to Muscatine to hold a 
series of meetings, and Sister Ella Royer will go at that 
tune to open up her work there. At our last district meet- 
ing, when the question was brought up as to placing an 
evangelist in the field, a brother said, "I know of no one 
in the district who could take up the work." The brother 
was sincere in what he said, for he saw the need of some- 
one and could see no one to take u- the work. But how 
mcely the Lord looks after his work, for at that time there 
was a brother and his wife who had in view this very kind 
of work, so that in the near future Bro. Olin Shaw will 
open up the evangelistic work. The district has freely 
given of her means to carry on this work, but let us not 
stop with this, but let us pray for these workers as they go 
into the field, that there may be an ingathering of souls. 

Bro. I. W. Brubaker has been filling the appointment at 
Muscatine once each month, and Dallas Center has said 
they would help in the work there, and so Muscatine will 
have meetings every two weeks instead of once a month. 
Now if any of the churches in the district have an outpost 
or an isolated place where they would like to have meet- 
ings, Bro. Shaw is at our service; so let us hear from such. 
So let your prayers ascend to the throne of grace for these 
workers, and not these alone, but there are others who 
are trying, to lift up fallen man. Pray for them. We as a 
board feel we need your prayers that we might direct 
the work that has been placed upon us. 

t, E. C. Trostle, Sec. 

Panora, Iowa, Dec. 31. 

♦ ^ <$> 

POMONA. CALIFORNIA. 



I came to this place in November to do what I can in the 
Lord's work here. 

There are about twenty-five members residing here and 
they are a working, active little band. There are two 
ministers. Eld S, E. Ynndt and Bro. J. A. Brubaker, Bro. 
Harvey Vaniman is nur Sunday-school superintendent. 

We arc not yet a separate organization, hut a part of the 
Lordsburg congregation, that place hcing just three miles 
distant. We have a neat little churchhouse on a corner lot, 
and room for a very commodious building when needed. 

Pomona has a population of 7,500; there are nineteen 
churches and no saloons; it is a city of churches and 
churchgoing people, and a larger per cent of church mem- 
bers than is usually found in any city. It is hard to find 
children who are not in Sunday school. 

These conditions are not as favorable to building up 
our Sunday school as some other places, but we feel it is 
just as important to have a churchhnuie for our own chil- 
dren that they may be kepi, as it is to gather in others. 

Pomona in ancient times was the goddess of fruitfnlness, 
hence the name for this very fruitful valley and prosperous 
city. 

Our Christmas exercises were held on Christmas night 
with a full house; we had a "giving Christmas." each 
member of the 'chool bringing something for the Or- 
phans' Home in Los Angeles. Susie Forney. 

390 E. Pasadena St., Dec 31 
<*> <3> •$> 

ON THE WAY TO INDIA. 



We arrived safely at Naples ten days ago. We had a 
week there between vessels, so we spent two days very 
pleasantly visiting noted nlaces nf interest at Rome, l. c., 
St, Peter's, the Vatican. St. Paul's, Si. John's, the Forum, 
the Coliseum and the home of the Cxsars. 

While at Naples we visited Pompeii, Vesuvius, the Rnyal 
Palace and the Museum. And none the less interesting 
were the queer costumes of the people, their habits, their 
carts, their stores and their houses. We could not always 
keep from smiling, and they seemed equally amused at us. 
We experienced not a little difficulty in making our wants 
known, because of our inability to speak Italian. 

Our voyage has been very pleasant indeed. Wc arc very 
thankful to the Lord for this. We know the prayers of 
his people in the homeland for us are being answered. 
During our stay at Naples a party of sixteen missionaries, 
bound for Bombay, came to our hotel and are now on the 
steamer with us. We are now all one happy party. 

We started yesterday from Naples on the ship Balduino, 
and are to-day stopping at Messina. Italy. The moun- 
tains snow-capped in the background and the city in the 
foreground make a beautiful picture. 

We are all well and are full of joy because we are on our 
way to India. We pray daily for our people in the home- 
land and hope they will continue to hold us up before the 
throne nf urace. In his name, Ella Miller. 

Dec. 21. 

<8> <S> <» 

SECOND DISTRICT OF WEST VIRGINIA. 



Dec. 21 the mission board of Middle Iowa met at Bro. 
Geo. B. Royer's. The meeting was opened by the chair- 
man who read the sixteenth chapter of Acts and led in 
prayer, after which the work was taken up. 



Our mission board had a meeting to consider plans for 
the coming year, and as each member was to look out 
some good places to do mission work I made a trip into 
Randolph county, West Virginia, about fifty miles. 
I preached four times at two places. The doc- 
trine of the Brethren has not been preached much at 
either of these places, only a brother or sister scattered 
here and there. The people gave me the best of attention. 

If there was more preaching done in the.se places I 
think snuls could be won for Christ. One little girl, about 
ten years'old, came forward the last night and said she 
wanted to be baptized, but her mother thought she was not 
old enough and did not thoroughly understand what she 
was doing. So she was not baptized, but we are going to 
try to have preaching there once a month, if we can get 
someone to go and preach. Our preachers to do mis- 
sion work are hard to find. 

J. F. Ross, Treas. of Missjon B.qard. 



J 



Fr«xK«»<mm 



r»w^ 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 19, 1907. 



Notes From Our Correspondents 






a thirsty soul. 






s from a far country. 



CALIFORNIA. 
Fruitvale church met in council Dec. 29, presided over 
by Ero. M. E. Andrews. Church. Sunday-school and 
Christian Workers' officers were elected. We have de- 
cided to have a series of meetings in March, conducted by 
Bro. Jesse Overholtzcr. — Mrs. Alice Myers, Bangor, Cal , 
Dec. 31. 

Inglewood church met in council Jan. S. with Bro. W. J. 
Thomas in charge. Church officers were elected for 1907; 
W. I. Thomas elder, and the writer agent and correspond- 
ent. We also elected Sunday-school officers; Susie Thom- 
as superintendent, Cecil Whisler secretary.— T. M. Cal- 
vert, Inglewood. Cal., Jan. 5. 

COLORADO. 
Fruita church met in council Jan. 5. Elders D*. M. 
Mohler and A. A. Weaver were present. A financial sys- 
tem for defraying expenses was adopted, and church offic- 
ers for the year were elected. Tile request of an aged 
deacon to be relieved from the duties of his office on ac- 
count of infirmities of age was granted. It was decided 
to hold a scries of meetings at an early date. Sunday 
school was reorganized with some changes in officers 
and teachers. The Christian Workers' meeting, which has 
been under the direction of the elder ever since the 
organization of the church, was organized by the election 
of Emma Horning as president and Wilfrid Arnold secre- 
tary. The Sisters' Aid Society gave a report of their work 
for the last year. By rtqucst Eld. D. M. Mohler gave an 
earnest admonition against the tendency to personal 
adornment, which was much appreciated.— Salome Sharp 
Fruita, Colo.. Jan. 7. 

Rockyford church met in council Jan. 5. Since our last 
meeting two have been received into the church by baptism 
six by letter, and two letters have been granted. Church 
officers were elected for the ensuing year, Bro. H. Ullom 
was retained as elder, Bro. Nevinger being the assistant. 
Bro Joseph Henard was chosen superintendent of the 
Sunday school. It was decided to hold a series of meet- 
ings in the near future. The Christian Workers' booklet 
will be used during thvueoming year.— Martha Heekman. 
kockyford, Colo.. Jan.. , 

St Vrain congregati, met in council Jan. 5. Church 
and Sunday-school office , were elected. H. C. Long and 
Daisy Jones were elected superintendents, and Blanch 
Long secretary and trea. Irer. The church has asked Bro 
Fitz to take entire charge of the preaching service at the 
church for one year. As our elder was not present Bro 
Myers acted as moderator of the meeting. Three letters 
of membership were granted. As the present church cor- 
respondent is soon to leave for Mt. Hebron, Cal , Bro 
I-itz was chosen to fill the vacancy— Oscar Moore, R. D 
3, Box 29, Longmont, Colo., Jan. 7. 

IDAHO. 
Clearwater church met in council Jan. S, Bro. S. Stookcy 
presiding As we were without an elder, the church unan- 
imously elected Bro. Stephen Johnson as our elder. The 
other church officers were retained for another term We 
reorganized Sunday school with Bro. J. A. Harlacher su- 
perintendent. We had services on Thanksgiving day 
Our next council will be Saturday before first Sunday in 
Kl n .1° Sherman Stookey solicits correspondence 
with Brethren who pass through Spokane, Wash on re- 
turn trip from Annual Meeting, to stop over and hold a 
series of meetings for us. Brethren wishing to change 
their location we would be glad to have stop and see our 
country. We are in need of ministerial aid.— Carrie E. 
Herring, Teakean, Idaho, Jan. 6. 

Nezperce church met in council Dec. 29, with Eld Ste- 
phen Johnson ,n charge. The Sunday school was reor- 
ganized W. C Lehman was elected superintendent, and 
Sister Calhe Price secretary. For Christian Workers' 
meeting, Sister Devore was elecled president. The writer 
was appointed Messenger agent and correspondent The 
church deeded to send $45 of the Thanksgiving offering 

purposes.— Wm. H. Lichty, Nezperce, Idaho, Jan. 4. 
ILLINOIS. 

,,H E ce ta Rr a ^r ! " , ir' 3 l' 10 f ° rra " PaSt ,° r ° f the CllUri:h « this 

wL\ ' ,1, '-, I ' J al "' cr ' now ° f Bethany Bible School 

Our <£„$ " S S" d , de,lvcred two very helpful sermons. 
Our Sunday school continues to grow, the number present 
vlll Z l y . b ?' n S„ e 'Shty-loi,r.-Mrs. Ella Moore, 238 
rark St., Batavia, 111., Jan. 8. 

Coal Creek church met in council Jan. 5, with Eld. S. 
Bucklew presiding. We deeded to repair our churchhouse 

orior , n ih s. a° dCC ,. dcd t0 hold a series ° f meeting, 
K," \ he Sunday-school convention, which is to be 

ve r J 1907 l Zl \ ° Ur t ^P SCh °°' ""eanized for the 
Cover R n « r ?' J: r£' f° ve , r S ttperintendent-S. L. 
cover, K. D. 6, Canton, III., Jan. 7. 

r»rf c .°, l0 w° rCh "f "V" ad i°t.rned meeting Dec. 26 to ar- 
range for a pastor for the coming yea?, beginning in 
March. It was arranged for the present pastor, t he • writer 
to serve another year. Jan. 5 the church met or the pur 
po»e of electing two deacons. Elders M. S. Newcomer "and 

in ,h if- aV '!, g 'l ccn ,nvucd bv ,he ehurch to assist 
n the flection. Brethren Allen Wade and David Gilbcr 
were elected, and with their wives were installed Jan 
6 our Sunday school began another year's work with the 
writer super,ntendent.-D. W. Rowland, Polo III Jan 7 

Pro'^h 5 H Ur ti h mC ' in ^° l ' ncil Dcc 31, with our elder 
Bro. John Heekman, pres ding. The ministerial commit 
tee presented the name of Bro Ezra F^o the cnXh 
as being available for pastor at this place Church , 

imously decided to call Bro. Flory. We expe", to ha e 

Sav «&% T tl "L ear ' y Spring ' We "organized our Sun- 
day school for the year. Bro. John Baker was chosen 
superintendent. Definite steps were taken in regard to 
Verona C°T n T-<: Wc , Sran, = d tw ° 'e«er, and re° 
E" t D n u C ,che B r:°309 & ttS^",^/"*- 
. ,. INDIANA. 

s. Bro. L. T. Holsinger will begin a series of meetings 



here the latter part of February or the first of March. 
Our Sunday school is moving along nicely, also Christian 
Workers' meeting. We have Sunday school and preach- 
ing every Sunday forenoon. Christian Workers' meeting 
at 7 P. M.. followed hy a sermon. We also have Aid So- 
ciety every two weeks, which is progressing nicely.— Ber- 
tha E. Halm, 259 N. Warman Ave., Indianapolis, Ind 
Jan. 11. 

North Liberty — Our yearly council convened Jan. 5 at 
our house in town, with our elder in charge. Annual re- 
ports were given and former church officers were reelect- 
ed. Bro. Charles Cripe was chosen as delegate to Annual 
Meeting. Brethren Isaac Earlv and Samuel Good were 
elected superintendents for our Sunday school in North 
Liberty, and Bro. Edward Kale at "Oak Grove. Our 
church is advancing both in financial and numerical lines. 
We now enroll one hundred and twenty-eight members. 
—Winnie E. Cripe, R. D. 2., North Liberty, Ind., Jan. 10. 

Rossville.— The revival at our new churchhouse at Ross- 
vi lie conducted by Bro. W. Lampin ; continues with a 
full house. Notwithstanding our house holds five hundred 
people as high as one hundred a night could not get in 
the whole town is stirred. This is the first meeting ever 
held here by the Brethren. Twenty-one have applied for 
membership Meetings continue.— J. D. Mishlcr, Rossville, 
Ind., Jan. 11. 

Turkey Creek.— Our series of meetings in Gravelton 
conducted by Bro. Samuel J. Burger, commenced Dec 15 
He labored earnestly for us until Jan. 7. He preached 
twenty-nine sermons. Ten precious young souls came out 
on the Lord's side. Seven were baptized and three are 
awaiting baptism. Those making the good choice were 
about all Sunday-school scholars. At the same hour 
of baptism and at the same place there were six applicants 
baptized from the Union Center district. Dec 26 the 
church met in council. Our elder, Daniel Wysong pre- 
sided. Two were received by letter and three letters were 
granted. Franklin Mitchel was elecled Sunday-school su- 
perintendent. Bro. S. J. Burger was with us.— L. D 
Ulery, R. D. 4, Nappanee, Ind., Jan. 8. 

IOWA. 

Coon River.— Eld. M. Dcardorff has sold his mercantile 
Dusiness and will now devote Ins time to ministerial work 
principally in the field as an evangelist. We hope and 
pray that this change may be blest of God in the enlarg- 
ing of Bro. Deardorff's field of usefulness, the conversion 
of sinners and the upbuilding of our Father's kingdom— J 
D, Haughtelm, Panora, Iowa, Jan. 8. 

Des Moines Valley.-Jan. 6 we enjoyed two acceptable 
sermons by Bro. D. E. Brubaker. Our Sunday school re- 
organized the first of the year, with Sister Mary Jasper 
superintendent.— Jas. Q. Goughnour. Ankeny, Iowa, Jan 9. 
,i,? ry , Creek cn I! rc " met in council Jan. 5, our elder, F. M. 
Whecer, presiding. Jan. 6 we reorganized our Sunday 
school. Our series of meetings began Dec. 26 and lasted 
wo weeks. Bro S. B. Miller gave us some strong doc- 
trinal sermons.— Minnie Belle Mentzer. R. D 1 Robins 
Iowa, Jan. 7. 

Greene cllurch met in council Jan. 5, Bro. W. H. Lichty 
presiding. Church -and Sunday-school officers were elected 

w. , ?, M J-. \'°- •'• D ' ? hook was cl ' ose " superintendent. 
We decided to have a series of meetings some time in June 
thirty dollars was raised and sent to our district mission 
board. Bro. Lichty remained over Sunday, preaching two 
good sermons.-Estella Eikenberry, Greene, Iowa, Jan 11 
Mt. Etna.-Bro. C. P Rowland began a series of meet- 
ngs at this place Dec. 1, continuing until Dec. 23, preach- 
of RKI 3 '" C ', g sc ™ ons . besides conducting a number 
of Bible readings. The members met in council Jan 5 
S„,;,i ram "i," ,"' aS a .P" oi " t .e<l to arrange a program for our 
Sunday-school, ministerial, missionary and Christian 

rnSrtr o mC T gS 't,' 5 b11 : We ask tl,e lurches in our 
district to send suitable topics for discussion to the under- 
signed.— I-annie M. Brower, Mt. Etna, Iowa, Jan 8 

Sot,thOtnjmv..- r O I , work is moving along encourag- 
ingly. All our services are attended with interest We aFe 
doing much more among the poor class of people than 
we ever have done, because we have had better assistance 
." the way of clothing. Yet we are, unable to meet alUhe 
demands for clothing. Two of our Sunday-school schol- 
,7' for e'othmg last evening, but had to be turned 
away because we did not have clothing for them. I went 
nto a home yesterday where the father has been ,n bed 
or twelve weeks with typhoid fever, and scarcely anything 
to ca or wear. Tile mother was sewing some pieces of 
old clothing together to make garments for the children 
We administered to their need the best we could Will 
you not take a little interest in our work here by gather 
mg up clothing ,„ your congregation and send us that 
these poor bodies may he clothed and fed? Send all pre- 
paid to the undersigned. We now have three applicants 
for baptism, heads of families, which will be attended to 
soon We expect Bro. C. S. Garber to begin our revival 

OmImwa, J ?o n wa?ja„; 7 E - ^ *» ^ M °°" *'' ^ 
KANSAS. 

Burroak church convened in council Jan. 5, with Eld 
fc "l r Sl °" ,k " P/es.d.ng. One letter was received, and 
five were granted. Christian Workers' meeting reorgan- 
ized or another six months, with Bro. H D Blocncr 
president. On Sunday the election of Sunday-school 

n,f rV^drY'rT 1 "t™'!/- l E r rnS ' -penntrS.^Em! 
ma J. Modlm, Burroak, Kans, Jan. 8. 

Independence church met in council Jan. 5. Our elder 

Thrfe 1^' ?"■ T £ MW " act « 1 " moderator' 
Inree letters of membership were received. Eld E D 
Root and family, formerly of Fredonia, came to us under 

aselect-d's, ,,' 110 Tv " b ° ard - SisU ' r Bet.ie R, o 
was elected Sunday-school superintendent. Our Christian 
Workers meeting was reorganized, with Sister Minnie 
Brammell president. Bro. Havanar is solicitor for home 
missions and the writer Messenger agent £ our Simrhv 
night services, our '.souls accepted Christ and iiow a ak 
kSSTJ^I a, " S ' 6 ° S N ' 16 * St " Independence!, 

mcltim?' 3 TI," rC ii 'T" t]y , 1,a< ! a V " y D| e a ^"t business 
Zl "!' S " nday I ch r? 01 and Christian Workers' 

"• ™ crc reorganized; Bro. John Sehule superintend- 
ent, and Mary Dory secretary of the Sunday school and 

Chr -I e w Pre J' de ." t - a " d Bcssie Wvant -« y re,a"y , f hi 
Christian Workers meeting. Geo. R. Eller is elder in 
charge for the ensuing year. The Grenola church is doing 
some very good work in Sunday school a „d Chris ia® 



Workers meeting. We have a membership of about sixty- 
five, of which thirty-five are young members. Twenty-six 
dollars ,s the result of dimes invested by the children for 
Chicago Sunday-school extension fund. The Chris- 
tian Workers decided to support an orphan in India— 
Geo. R. Eller, R. D. 3, Molinc, Kans., Jan. 9. 

Ozawkie-Bro. AC. Brubaker made us a pleasant call 
recently. While with us he preached eight inspiring ser- 
mons. We had children's meeting on Christmas day. 
tlrvS! ?? I™!?- " ,vc ?te>l the Sunday school gathered 
$10.81 One-half « to be sent to world-wide missions and 
the other half to the Kansas City mission!— H. L. Bram- 
mell, Ozawkie, Kans., Dec. 29. 

MICHIGAN. 

Bear Lake.- We met in council Jan. 5, our elder, S. 
1 ounce, presiding. We decided to hold an election for a 
minister at our next regular council. We organized a Sis- 
ters Aid Society The writer president. Sister Younce 
secretary. Church trustees were reelected. We reorgan- 
w /"■", S ,"" day , sclKXl1 ' W - E ' Youn K superintendent. 
We decided to ask our district mission board for a series 
ot meetings, to begin some time in April if possible. Our 
miarterlv collection was $4.47.— Rose Tecgarden, R. D. 
3, Box 36, Petoskey, Mich, Jan. 7. 

Berrien church has met with a season of rejoicing One 
precious soul, being afflicted, asked to be baptized which 
was performed in due time, Dec. 30, and on Friday even- 
ing following, the members gathered at her home and held 
communion services with her, and at that communion the 
mother of the afflicted was reclaimed. Bro. Eli Roose and 
wife were with us and remained with us over Lord's Day 
Jan. 5 was our council. We expect to hold a protracted 
meeting in the near future.— Sarah J. Weaver. R. D 2 Bcr- 
nen, Mich.. Jan. 8. 

Black River.— We met in council Dec. 29. We reorgan- 
ized Sunday school and elected new church officers. Bro 
LA. Fisher was reelected superintendent of our Sunday 
school Sister Suavely was elected Messenger correspond- 
ent.— Ellen Stoneburner, R. D. 2, Bangor, Mich., Jan. 10. 
, Crystal church met in council Jan. 5. The election of 
church officers passed off nicely. Wc talked about the 
advisability of dividing the church district, which will 
come up at a later council. As we have no resident elder 
the church chose Eld. C. L. Wilkins to shepherd us The 
council was presided over by the pastor, Geo. E. Stone 
I he next council will be held in the Vestaburg church- 
house. April 6. We arranged for a series of meetings and 
a singing class, to be conducted by I. C. Snavely secre- 
tary and treasurer of the mission board, sometime the 
first of February.— Tillie Stone, Crystal, Mich., Jan. 7. 

Zion.— Dec. 30 our members met in Sunday school and 
reelected officers, with Bro. Andy Taylor superintendent 
^ion has an evergreen Sunday school. Our average at- 
tendance is thirty-two. We have three meetings at Zion 
eaci month by the mission board giving us one meeting 
each month Bro. Geo. Dcardorff preached Ian. 6. We 
are a part of the Lakeview church, but somewhat isolated 
as we are some twenty miles northeast of our church at 
Brethren. If there is any minister or elder that is think- 
ing of changing location, wc would be glad to have them 
come here Wc have a good opening here to build up a 
church. We have good land cheap, good water, healthy 
climate. I would be glad to correspond with members in 
reSar ,., tn „ ,, " s country, as we need help in the good work 
—J. W. Beckner. R. D. 2, Mesick, Mich, Jan. 7 

MISSOURI. 

Log Creek congregation met in council Jan. 5, with our 
. ', ' £~ kHenberger, presiding. Sunday-school and 
church officers were elected for the coming year. Bro. 
J. K. hJlenberger was reelected Sunday-school superin- 
tendent. Christian Workers' officers were also elected for 
six months, with V. I. Moats president. The interest 
holds up well in all our services, especially in the Sunday 
school.— Anna E. Moats, Polo, Mo, Jan. 6. 

Walnut Creek church met in council Jan. 5, with Eld 
A. VVampler presiding. The writer was chosen corre- 
spondent. Though few in number, wc arc glad to meet 
together.— W. B. Maxwell, Montserrat, Mo., Jan. 8. 
NEBRASKA. 

Beatrice.— Jan. 5 was our council. Eld. L. D. Bosser- 
inaii presided at the meeting. Sunday-school officers were 
elected for 1907. An effort is to be made to have a Fourth 
ot July Sunday-school meeting here.— E. J. Kessler, Bea- - 
trice, Nebr, Jan. 5. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 
Deslacs Valley church met in council Jan. 5. the elder 
in charge presiding. Six members were received by letter 
and three letters were granted. We elected officers for 
Sunday school and Christian Workers' meeting for the 
coming year; superintendent of Sunday school, Bro J C 
Morton; president of Christian Workers, Bro G I 
Michael The writer was chosen church correspondent. 
Wc decided to discontinue our Christian Workers' meet- 
ing at night for three months, but arranged to have a ses- 
sion every alternate Sunday immediately after Sunday 
school.— Effie L. Forney, R. D. 3, Kenmare, N. Dak, Jan.6. 

Egeland congregation met in council New Year's day 
at the Pleasant View house. Our elder, A. M. Sharp, 
being absent, Eld. J. W. Dcardorff presided. We had a 
very interesting meeting. Officers were elected for the 
coming year; Bro. C. H. Deardorff Messenger agent; Sis- 
ter Ldna Wagner church solicitor, and the writer cor- 
respondent. Because of the deep snow and bad roads the 
church services in Egeland and the Christian Workers' 
meeting at the Pleasant View house were discontinued 
until spring. Owing to the intense interest manifested at 
the Bible normal held at Cando by Bro. G. M Lauver 
we decided to accept his offer to hold a two weeks' Bible 
normal at thi» place next summer. Dec. 23 we reorgan- 
ized our evergreen Sunday school. Bro A B Puter- 
baugh was chosen superintendent.— Thos. J. Barnhart, 
Egeland, N. Dak, Jan. 4. 

Rocklake church met in council Dec. 27. We decided to 
meet on Thursday of each week for Bible study. Our 
Sunday school was reorganized yesterday. Bro. Chas 
Wells was reelected superintendent. The writer was 
chosen correspondent. We would like to sec more mem- 
bers move into this congregation to help along with the 
Masters cause.— J. H. Brubaker, Ellison, N. Dak, Dec. 31. 

Surrey.— Our last council for 1906 convened Dec 29 
Wc selected all our officers for the ensuing year. Bro. 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.-January 19, 1907. 



DM. Shorb and Geo. Stryckcr were chosen as our pre- 
siding elders for one year. Bro. C. E. Dresher was se- 
lected as Messenger agent and the writer as church cor- 
respondent. We reorganized our Sunday school; Bro 
J E. Coy superintendent. On account of the inclemency 
of the weather our Christian Workers' meeting and Sun- 
day evening service have been discontinued for a few 
months. Our Sunday school continues with interest — 
Manerva Lambert, Surrey, N. Dak., Jan. 7. 

OHIO. 

East Nimishillen.— Our meetings at the Lake church 
commenced on the evening of Dec. 22 and continued until 
Jan. 3. hour precious souls were willing to unite with the 
people of God. Bro W A. Wiley conducted the meet- 
ings.— A. J. Carper, Middlebranch, Ohio, Jan. 8. 

Lick Creek church met in council Jan. 5, Bro. Geo W 
.Sellers presiding. We elected the officers for the coming 
year. Ida E kintner was elected correspondent for an- 
other year. We decided to have a missionary sermon 
heb. 3. Bro. Perry McKimmey expects to begin a series 
of meetings Jan. 13 at the Tabernacle house, a mission 
point Next Sunday evening we expect to reorganize 
Christian Workers' meeting. We have closed our singing 
class for this winter; next spring we expect to take it u? 
again.— Ida E. Kintner, Bryan, Ohio, Jan. 8. 

Lexington.— Our series of meetings, conducted by Bro 
Samuel Sncll, closed Dec. 30. Bro. Snell came to us Dec 
He visited m the homes of a few of the members 



school scholars 

rs. 
school is 



..y*e t "packaSs a """ * *" m - '° - ,ta 



were distributed. Our 

council eTS?.! 01 ' " IMly -. Ja " : 5 ' we '>*' °«r 
the councM C ' (P ? 1 ", 1 "' our , assistant elder, conducted 
w P , i"'', °" r , e,dcr ' not bein g »°le "> he 
We elected church and Sunday-school officers 
iimg year. The writer was reelected supcrin- 
We belong to the Meyersdale congregation and 
ocated twenty-two miles east of Meyefsdale and 
w i .°*, < " , ™ 1 > , -'rlaiid, Md., on the B. & O. 
We kindly invite any minister passing this 
way to stop off and preach for us, as we stand very much 
ore preaching.— Edward Harden, Hyndman, 



E. P. Steffcy, R. D. 7, Staunton, Va. 
Topico church met in , 



Dec. 



vith 

for the 
tendent. 



fourteen mile 
and P. R. R. 



in need of 
Pa., Jan. 10. 



15 

that were not able to attend church and ministered "to 
them We feel that lie has done a good work among us 
We have Sunday school every Sunday morning at 9-30 
with good attendance and much interest.— Jennie Henrv' 
Highland, Ohio, Jan. 8. 

Ludlow.— Since our last report one— a mother and the 
wife of a brother— came into the church through the bap- 
tismal gate at Red River, where Bro. B. F. Petry closed a 
series of meetings Dec. 23. Twenty-one practical sermons 
were delivered. Bro Petry also conducted a very interest- 
ing children's meeting. Bro. Geo. D. Zollers is conduct- 
ing a series of meetings at Painter Creek.— Levi Minnich 
Greenville, Ohio, Jan, 7. 

Reading.— Dec. 30 we elected officers and chose teachers 
for the next six months; Bro. W. W. Stroup superintend- 
ent. We also chose officers and adopted a resolution for 
our Christian Workers' meeting. Much interest is being 
taken. During these winter months we are having a Bible 
reading conducted by our pastor, Bro. J. R. Heffner, which 
is of much benefit to all Sunday-school workers — Rena 
Heestand, R. D. 2, Moultrie, Ohio, Jan. 7. 

Trorwood church met Dec. 30 for divine service having 
been deprived of their privilege since Oct. 7, on account 
of building an addition to the churchhouse. Eld J W 
Beeghly preached for us both morning and evening Jan 
2 we met in council, one week later than the usual time 
Our elder, Bro. John Smith, who has been shut in for 
quite a while, is convalescing, but still unable to meet with 
us. Our assistant elder, Bro. L. A. Bookwalter, presided 
at our council. A committee was appointed for Christian 
Workers. Sister Delia Landis was appointed Messenger 
agent. Jan. 6 we reorganized our Sunday school, with Bro 
1 nomas Kams superintendent. After Sunday-school or- 
ganization. Eld. J. C. Stoner gave us an excellent sermon. 
Eld. D. M. Carver preached for us in the evening. Brother 
and Sister Thomas Karns, who were struck by a traction 
car Dec. 12 and seriously injured, are slowly recovering — 
Sarah E. Minnich, Trotvvood, Ohio, Jan. 7. 

OKLAHOMA. 

Durham.— We have been blessed by the presence of my 
lather, A. W Austin, during the holidays. He held some 
meetings 1 lie people are not very well off, but they 
would gladly welcome a minister to settle among us. 
Anyone looking for a good home where vegetation of all 
kinds may be grown, can do well to come and help build 
up our new country, where much might be done in fulfill- 
mg .'"'""ssion of Christ. Let us hear from anyone who 
would like to come over and help. We have lived here 
isolated for nearly six years and are very anxious to have 
some of our Brethren move in among us.— Lottie E Car- 
ver, Durham, Okla., Jan. 6. 

Red Riyer congregation recently enjoyed a revival held 
by Bro. Ira P. Eby. Two brothers and one sister were 
received by baptism. Bro. Eby came to us Nov 17 re- 
maining till Dec. 18. Dec. 8 he conducted our love feast, 
twenty-three communing. At our council, Dec. 6, definite 
plans were made to build a meetinghouse this year, with 
Brethren G. A. Fillmore, Appleman and Cooper as solicit- 
ors. Six members have lately been received by letter — 
Mrs. Edna Cooper, Frederick, Okla., Jan. 5. 

Washita church met in council Jan. 5, with our elder, 
A. L. Boyd, presiding. He was also reelected for another 
year u Sunday-school officers for the next six months 

are Bro. Wiltfong superintendent and Sister Bertha Boyd 
secretary.—John R. Pitzer, Cordell, Okla., Jan. 7. 

OREGON. 
Rogue River church met in council Jan. 5. It was de- 
cided to retain all the officers elected one year ago for an- 
other year. We elected Bro. Joseph Spitzer solicitor for 
district expenses; Sister Mina Webster solicitor for gen- 
eral mission. Two letters were granted. A collection of 
¥> was taken up for home church expenses. Members 
who are looking for new homes are heartily invited to 
come and locate here and help build up the work which 
has been begun.— Nancy Bahr, Talent, Oregon, Jan. 6. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Ephrata church seems to have started the New Year 

k u encwed zeal and enthusiasm. Sunday school and 

church services were well attended. The Willing Work- 

"n v f. monthly meeting Jan. 6. The subject was 

New Year," and the program consisted of scripture 

reading and reciting, and poems and songs. This was ren- 

uered by the little people, mostly between the ages of four 

and fourteen. The older people will hold their monthly 

missionary meeting Jan. 7.— Mazie Martin, Ephrata, Pa., 

Farmers Grove church closed a very interesting series 
of meeting Jan. 2, by Bro. Wm. Miller. He delivered 
wenty-two inspiring sermons. Seven were added to the 
chl y ba P' lsm , five of them being Sunday-school 
Rv .: I: lhe members were much edified.— Lina H. 
Book, Honeygrove, Pa., Jan. 7. 

exS" dman '~, 0n chris 'mas day we had short Christmas 
exercises at the church for the benefit of our Sunday- 



, , n ,0 S n i S ! T'~ J Wc '"?}■ in C0l,ncil Dec - 27 - with Eld. Da- 
vid Hilderbrand presiding. Officers were elected for the 

eh'cT,? T r ' ,' th l cl0SC cf the ycar ° ur S »« d »y school 
elected officers for the coming six months. The Sunday- 

„„ ?°L Ch " sl " ,as "erases were held Sunday evening, 

Uec. 23. the exercises were chiefly hv the children A 
real to the school followed. At this meeting i, answer 

to a request from the St. Joseph. Mo., mission, a col ec- 
ion of over ten do lars was taken, the money to be used 

to furnish a New Year's dinner to the poor of that place. 

Our Christian Workers' band elected officers for the com- 

FfU^.t, w . o r pnization has been doing good work.- 

Elizabeth Wertz, Johnstown, Pa., Jan. 7-. 
Little Swatara.-Bro. D. M. Eshelman discontinued his 

scries of meetings at the Ziegler house Dec. 29 The 
church is much encouraged. Sunday afternoon, Dec. 16, 

Brethren E. W. Edns, E. M. Wenger and Jacob Pfautz 
addressed a large attendance of children and parents at 
the I-rystown house. After the services a very encourag- 
ing contribution for India missions was taken.— Henrv M 
Frantz, Cross Kill Mills, Pa., Jan. 10. 

Norristown church met in council last evening, with ad- 
joining Elders F. P. Cassel and Jas. B. Shisler present 
with us, who proved very helpful in the work. Reports 
from committees were heard, financial standing, the creat- 
ing of an executive board, arranging of leaders for 
Wednesday evening prayer meetings, and other work of 
importance was duly considered.— T. F. Imler, Norris- 
town, Pa., Jan. 11. 

Raven Run.— The evening before Christmas our Sunday 
school held its Christmas services. Those who took part 
were mostly little folks. Our elder then gave us a short 
talk, which was very good. Jan. 5 we held our council 
our elder, S. I. Brumbaugh, presiding. We expect to hold 
a meeting in May. Bro. Daniel Clapper is to do the 
preaching— Sadie V. Reed, R. D. 1, Saxton, Pa., Jan. 11. 

Reading— On Saturday evening we had our council 
meeting, with Eld. Edward Wenger in charge. There is 
a deeper interest and more activity shown in all branches 
of the work here, and if hard work and devotion to duty 
on the part of Bro. Weaver, who came here from the Lan- 
caster City congregation, mean anything, the influence 
of our beloved Brotherhood will be felt in the city of 
Reading.— Henry H. Moyer, 634 N. 6th St., Reading Pa 
Jan. 6. 

Snake Spring Valley.— Bro. David R. Stayer began a 
series of meetings Dec. IS, which closed Dec 30. He 
preached nineteen sermons. Two precious souls were 
brought to Christ. The church greatly appreciated Bro 
Stayer's services.— Howard Hershberger, Everett Pa 
Jan. 5. 

Upper Canowago church met in council in East Berlin. 
Jan. S, with our eider, C. L. Baker, presiding. Eight let- 
ters were granted. We decided to have series of meetings 
at the following places next fall: Mummerts, Hampton 
and I.atimore. Our spring love feast is to be at the Mum- 
mert house, May 25 and 26. Those soliciting for missions 
in our church reported having received $130.75 in the 
past year, besides the pledges for Brooklyn meetinghouse. 
The writer was again reelected Sunday-school superin- 
tendent. Adjourned to meet at the Hampton house, April 
6.— Andrew Bowser, East Berlin, Pa., Jan 7 



d^ ! 5r?-- K «« r v 2 » 

S„nd"v y sch e M el r W f had " ""vices Christmas day. Our 
Sunday school has also been reorganized for the coming 
year with officers and teachers. Two h v ■ bee, rec ™ =d 
Jan 7. S ' nC ° '"' report.-Vena S. Bussard, Volar, Va, 
WEST VIRGINIA. 

S P w aS K"' Vi ? W cl, " rch ""'.? co " ncil ->'••"■ 5- Our elder, 
,,' , t I ' DC ",' S , vory f«l>lc, asked Bro. J. M. Crouse 
to lake charge o the meeting. We decided to have our 

^e^yt^'Va'.^T' °™ ***^& "■ 
Shiloh.-Eld. Obed Hainstead was called near this place 
on Monday following 



Dec. 22. At the home of the writ 
the father, 



fa, ,r mother and one brother put on Christ by bap 
ism. In the evening he began a scries of meetings at the 
above-named place and continued till Deo. 30 One came 
W Va., l Jan.t si(k - Arizo ' la Auvil, Wiley Eurna^ 

WASHINGTON. 

North Yakima church met in annual council Ian S Of 
fleers for the church, Sunday school and Christian Work- 
ers were elected Bro, Alpha Miller was chosen super- 
intendent of Sunday school and Pro. Hubert Nead presi- 
dent of Christian Workers.-Mac Miller, 114 North Ran- 
ier Ave., North Yakima, Wash., Jan. 9. 

Tekoa.-We met in council Dec. 29, Bro. J. H. Stover 
presiding. Sunday school was organized with Jennie K 
Hale superintendent j Sister Annie Huffman president of 
the Christian Workers' meeting. Our Thanksgiving offer 
jng amounted to '$12.50.-Jenm e K. Hale. Tckoa, Wash., 

Wenatchee.— We arc now in the midst of a series of 
meetings. Dec. 23, Bro. Geo. Wt Bun.aiu gave us an in- 
teresting sermon In the evening our meetings began 
with Bro, Darnel Whitmer as s , aker. He returned to 
this place from the home of I daughter at Centralia, 
Wash Our members are cue, ,-ged. Our council was 
held Dec. 29. Eld. Jesse Pel, , presided. Eld. A B 
Peters attended council at Chewelah. Wash., the same 
day, so could not be with us. .' '.vc letters were received 
rmd one was granted. Our cluu'ch officers were elected 
for the coming year. We decided hereafter to elect Sun- 
day-school superintendent and assistant in council' s.. 
elected Bro. Henry Ganger superintendent. Sunday- 
school organization was completed Dec 30 —Lewis E 
Ulnch, R. D. 2, Wenatchee, Wash., Jan. 2. 

WISCONSIN. 
Maple Grove church met in council Jan. S, Bro W If 
Byer presiding. Our Sisters' Aid Society has made u 
rangements to whitewash and paint the church on the in- 
side. Bro. Byer filled his regular appointment Jan 6. 
four miles south of. the church, at the Lathrop school- 
house, with thirty in attendance,— Katie Mock. R D 1 
Box 77, Stanley, Wis., Jan. 8. 



CORRESPONDENCE 



FROM WASHINGTON CITY, D. C. 



West Conestoga.— A short time ago we held a very in- 
teresting series of meetings in the Akron house. Bro. 
Levi Mohler preached for us. Ten dear souls gave their 
hearts to God, nine being baptized a few weeks ago and 
one reclaimed. Jan, 13 a series of meetings will begin in 
the Lititz house, to be conducted by Bro. Wm. A. An- 
thony. — Linn H. Nies, Lititz, Pa., Jan. 5. 

Wellsville.— By direction of the mission board of the 
Southern District of Pennsylvania, I commenced a series 
of meetings Dec. IS at the Farmer* Grove house, Juniata 
Co., Pa., and closed Jan. 2. I found a small band of work- 
ers anxiously waiting for this work. During these meet- 
ings the people came out night after night regardless of 
sect or creed. The Lord added seven precious souls to 
the little flock. The church is without a resident minister. 
I have promised to help the work there whenever it is 
possible. Eld. E. D. Book has the oversight of the work, 
and does all he can at his advanced age and his distance 
from them.— Wm. H. Miller, Wellsville, Pa., Jan. 9. 

White Oak.— Dec. 15 a 'series of meetings was opened in 
the Manheim church, continuing until Jan. 6. Eld, John 
Herr conducted the services. He delivered twenty-five 
sermons, which resulted in the conversion of fourteen pre- 
cious souls, all heads of families with the exception of a 
few. The members feel strengthened. Another series of. 
meetings will be held in the White Oak house, Jan. 19, 
Bro. Henry Zug promising to be with us.— Susan Gibble. 
Manheim, Pa., Jan. 7. 

VIRGINIA. 
Germantown congregation met in council Jan. 5, with 
Eld. R. L. Peters presiding. Five letters of membership 
were granted. Sunday school was reorganized. Bro. J. B. 
Peters was elected superintendent. The writer was re- 
appointed church correspondent. Bro. D. B, Naff, our 
yearly solicitor, made a report of $28.75 for mission work, 
and was also reappointed. Brethren R. L. Peters and J. 
W. Barnhart were elected to hold monthly services at a 
mission point in Pittsylvania county for 1907. It was de- 
cided to hold a Christian Workers' meeting, beginning 
Jan. 20. Bro. D. N. Eller came to us Dec. 25 and labored 
for one week, preaching fourteen sermons. Three came 
out on the Lord's side. The services were well attended. 
The brethren and sisters feel much strengthened. — Zaida 
M. Barnhart, Wirtz, Va., Jan. 7. 

Staunton church gave their Christmas celebration the 
evening of Dec. 28. The house was full of eager and very 
attentive listeners. Presents were given by teachers to 



The work of the Washington City church for 1907 has 
started off pleasantly and busily fur the workers. Sunday 
all the meetings were well attended and the day was all 
that could be expected; thus the attendance was favorably 
influenced. The newly-elected Sunday-school officers and 
every teacher were in attendance and the good work »i 
training the young minds for usefulness in the future 
church was well begun. 

Last night the church convened in regular quarterly 
council. Eld. A. P. Snader, our elder in charge, was pies 
ent; also Eld. Wm. M. Wine, of Union Bridge, Md. The 
meeting was presided over by Eld. C. D. Bonsack, our 
pastor. 

The time of Eld. A. P. Snader as elder in charge expired 
and Bro. Bonsack was, by ballot, selected his successor 
for one year. The treasurer's report showed considerable 
increase in the yearly offerings, even more than twice that 
of 1905. 

The official body of the church was delegated as a com- 
mittee to arrange for a pastor for the year beginning April 
1, 1907. 

Other business was disposed of in a way, we hope, prof- 
itable to all concerned. One certificate of membership 
was accepted. Bless the Lord for the coming of the dear 
brother, and may more follow. We decided to purchase 
two dozen Hymnals for use in the church. 

This morning a dear old sister in the Lord sent her son 
to call the elders to come and anoint her in the name of 
the Lord according to the teaching of James. Elders 
Wine, Snader and Bonsack responded to the call, and 
thus once more in this city of so much society the teach- 
ing of the Bible was observed. May the blessings follow 
the rite. To-night we meet in Bible study and teachers' 
meeting. All of these services are greatly appreciated, 
and especially so when one is deprived for a time as was 
Sister Bonsack, who was confined to her house for eleven 
weeks and for the first time was at services on Sunday and 
again last night. We bless God for her presence among 
us. M. C. Flohr. 

338 8th St., S. E„ Washington. D. C, Jan. 8, 



! *S 



I 



i 



H 



- IHK1M 



46 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.—January 19, 1907. 



MA TRIMONIAL 



"What therefore God has joined toce-llic' 



Marriage i 



■s should he accompanied by r.O c 



Baer-Workman.— At the home of the bride's parents 
Bro. Martin L. Workman. Dec. 24, 1906, by tile under- 
signed. Brc. Charles A. Baer, of Mishawaka, Ind and 
Sister Trelhe Way Workman, of the Spring Creek church 
Kosciusko county, Ind. I. B. Wike. ' 

Kirby-Miller.— At the residence of the undersigned, 
near Mloores Store, Va., Dec. 16, 1906, Bro. John O Kir' 
by and Georgia E. Miller. J. Carson Miller. 

Miller-Fox.— Mr. Bert Miller and Miss Pearl Fox 
daughter of Bro. John Fox. all of Grand Junction Colo ' 
were united in the holy bonds of matrimony by the under- 
signed, on New Year's evening. D. M. Click. 

Myers-Dubs.-Dec. 29, 1906, at the home of and by the 
undersigned at Tolna, Pa., Mr. Joseph H. Myers and Miss 
-Minnie S. Dubs, both of near Glen Rock. York Co Pa 

J. H. Keller. 
Srmth-I.orenz.-Dcc. 25. 1906, at the Plevna Brethren 
church, by Eld. Amos Kendall, Bro. Jacob E. Smith and 
bister Tena Lorenz, of Plevna, Ind. H. Lorenz. 

Shaw-Roop.— At the home of the bride's parents, Mea- 
dow Branch, near Westminster. Md„ Christmas Day 1906 
by the undersigned and the bride's uncle, Eld E M =en- 
seney. Miss Amy L. Roop, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs 
John D. Rood, was married to Mr. William A. Shaw, the 
only son of the late Marshall Shaw, of Uniontown, a 1 of 
Carroll county, in the State of Maryland. W. E. Roop. 

Steele-Fisher.— At the home of the bride's parents near 

J^e^Fishfr: ^ ^ ^ *'" °» '' ^VIlfF 

Strong-Ammict— At the residence of the undersigned 

Ammkk boT'of^v, 2S ' !?° 6 ' Fra " k Stro "8 and Maud 
.Ammick, both of Abilene. Kans. J. F, Hantz 



FALLEN ASLEEP 



"Blessed are the dead which die in Uie I^ird.' 



Death notices of ehlldren n ndcr flee years not pnbllshed. 

Beck Sister Amanda, born in Union county Pennsyl- 
vania died in the bounds of the Sugar Valley congrega- 
tion near Carroll, Pa., Dec. 23, 1906, aged 49 years 4 
months and 24 days. She leaves a husband 6 two daughters 

writer, text, Romans 16. A i fred Mi „ er 

ch^Il?' d S i eH er t A ,r a ,,r' ee - Fr £ ntz ' of the P1 «sant Hill 

s e o^a„TBr F o U M-'FfoS:" 5 C °" dUCted » %£ ^Ineif 
Buckey, Sister Elizabeth R., wife of friend Geo R Ri.el- 

IgPlssSkSall 

to rest in the cemetery at Pne Creek- mh.m f-iL i • , 
services were IipM ln H .i, ■ ^ re . CK ' where the funera 

Kmh srss d ^trrSfTd^z Eid - T - >■ 

bv n X d i!^ e ,,^- m --".'^ d fle d rarwa^, a cS l ducte1 
by the writer, assisted by D & Hendricksra"'™ 1 """^ 

^^^^c^^S^ 

poison, aged 13 vears ? m™/!,. a ,* ' , ]yu °. °f blood 
an obedient daughter She la ,\ days ' Shc wa s 

three brothers, fc ^Tl?^^ T^^. 

were born four daughters T„d, no To this union 

b a ; h "£Tni?t„° -*■ £ ^°« r ^ s r„ h d,, i c h s 

brothers survive Services bvth-i m ?" ,cr and "Tee 
assisted by Brethren^T %$£™S £°S. *&££ 

Fl„„ c- „.. J- H - Pike, 

flory Sister Elizabeth, nee Sanger wife of Fid r c 

a husband, ni„ y e childre™ ?afl cf^th 6 dayS ' „ S1,C >»™ 
church in early life) She i tr ,, ™ ""' ted with 'he 
in Israel, much interested Truss L* ^"^"a'ed mother 

aU who knew her "sfpaTsId ftm T^L^l^t 



hope of a blessed immortality. Funeral services conducted 
by Eld. A. Hutchison and Eld. VVm Thomas. * * * 

Foglesonger Sister Jennie, nee Wineman, wife of Bro 
£"*„"' l° s hr ng "'/\% d a' her home in Waynesboro; 
Pa., Dec 31, 1906, aged 32 years, 6 months and 22 days 
She united with the Brethren church early in life and lived 
an exemplary life. She is survived by her hus- 
band a son and a daughter. Services were conducted by 
Eld. J. B. Ruthrauff. Text was a portion of Jer. 15: 9. 
Sudie M. Wingert 
Friend, Sister Ada, wife of Bro. D. H. Friend, died in 
Marshalltown, Iowa, Dec. 16, 1906, aged 36 years, and 2 
days. She united with the Brethren church about fifteen 

thS son ' 5°I ""h" 1 ' , S1 " ' C i ves a ,ath "- h «sbauc 
three sons and two daughters. Funeral services at the 

chi, rJh F ' °l CaS ' °* M a«halltown. Interment near 
hZh t""'? 1 scr , v , ,ce , s by the writer, assisted by W. H 
Hood. Text, Rev. 14: 13. j. j. Brower 

Gamble, Sister Annie Elizabeth, wife of Willie Gamble 

and's dav" S k° D "' 'V 906 .' aSed 28 3'ears, 6 momhs 
ai d S days. She was a daughter of Bro. Win. Snuffer 

at Crab 8 Or°ch, 1 IV v' Un cl ed With the B '«hren church 
a Crab Orchard, W Va. She was a faithful Christian 
She leaves a husband, one son and an infant daughter 
* Y" a K«at sufferer for over two months. She was 
operated on for appendicitis Thursday before she died 

Gibble, Bro. John G. died in the bounds of the Chimies 

De/SP ™r,'a n „f/ m MaStErS S nvi " e ' Pa ' ° f 'yPhoid feTer 
Dec. 26, 1906, aged 60 years, 4 months and 6 days. He with 
his companion was received into the Chiques church 
Pennsylvania, by baptism April 21, 1895. He leaves wife 
seven sons, one daughter, one brother and three listers' 

1 rTnWI tlK ChUl T hOUSe by A ' S - Hottest",, ! Engl- 
ish, and the writer, German. Text, Amos 4: II 12 His 
body was laid to rest in the cemcter.v near by. 
u , ~ Henry S. Zug. 

Hannahs, Robert, born in Marion county, Ohio died 

$£ f^oS STday. ^ tvef ii^n-mi 

w|r^:sa°9^s d — -ft^jgSH? 

in the Wth' - Sam ( U ^ died De ^' I9 ' 1906 - a' Alliance, Ohio 
"vtc str l y f- 0f h ', S ag , e - , Death was "used by a par-: 

w- i nr D. F. Stuckey. 

K Die?,!" ie emed dd ^J' f. DiehVand "'cfea'coii 
A." Hehsal Dec 14 Im™",";? m Pcnns ^ania to James 

T^em^"e S^,^^^ ifcle ?Ji.'"SS 

£^S=r r dsS 
Hr#SSS!S|pai 

K-itoV, c- v c- J' D " Haughtelin. 

atp h hoSrfn Indrew^ Inl, &, ^ ^gfffi 

52 1 Senr-wiSLIpY Sy,^„,r ^ r S ! 

wer S e U ^r e „ d ,'h n marriaBe '? S °>° m °» Kitch To thisln o, 

iSaS^^^^iS«sS 
S^dSiin-f^^feS 

vices ^^ Elders J.^a" SS^JtW-.^SK 

S^le*e d r b?,'sb°a„-' tK S^Sf^^ 
son preceded her to the spirit land <M? aif ^ ters - One 
ber of the Brethren cl iSreh l\ ? was a mcm - 

lived a consistent "ife Fu„erS 0V , r 'H rt , y years - She 
Petty, assisted by the brethr",' '""^t^A^ 9" F ' 

^he R ^ ^-Sl d |>r h lf h l8al. S fflg 
resided ever since She " u o Wa '; r '°°. I°wa, where she 
three brothers, ^nta* ffiSon^^^&iSy 



iSS a S" d S^^'^stS^rue^ 

%%?&?&.% n, -r- ^^/r^tter 

D,duU, e ^lS:; ,fi D l c 1 c S 4 CO i t 906 i ' : a d gedff St ' M f[ y ' S K5 ? S " iW - 

A. 11. Reeves. 

Ma H rSr'R S oX e ^in d C J o n - t/a'Tge^ & h ° me "^ Ne " 
married to Ann! W.mpler/ Eeb^l 1»M ^nL Ji,™ 

is survived by one aged sister and five chi dren Bra 

ma y Tars 11 'f^Lr^ °' " ,C Brethren church for 

H.oy ST P^Iet, — S C tS.^'£e D - 

Sefong. Sister Hannah, wife of Bro. Jacob Sefone died 

£v,S^e^bfEEf£rSvF^ 
Showalter, Sister Susan, nee Miller, wife rf Bro'tno 
near^ ^gr vf ^a d 'a^ed'V"- * A" \ '" h °™ 
day. She Sntra^a se^r/cofd^Sd^e^g" 1 if lelfcate 
of t c" Brethren HZT^ Sh " WaS a c °" si "-" -™b 
b^d^^'s'r a^'^o ttS.r^S. d^ugnte^receS 
Elderf I a' r rV ! CeS at , Cedar Run <*urch. condSc te 1 by 
^I'S^ieaVb^i.^/^ 
Shugard, Harry, Jr. In his death notice published Tin 

c! w -reter Brower 

dren Funeril at p;„ 7- lLave ^ a wife and ten chi - 

Zieler and I A r ? r Grov ?, church b y EWers J P 
iigier and J. A. Garber, from Psa. 73: 24. 

Teet.r n ■ , , „ L - Katie Ritchie. 

T=«et r de?e a a n s'e e .Xd^D^r'iT {stb" Sed^ ^"'J 
months and 25 davs Tt,» i ' a ' ? ed 36 y ears . 9 

Abr r am a !>ock " eral '"'"^ W " e c ?" d "f e 1 by"^ Eld. 
\t, _ lilizabeth Wertz 

Tc^fa S, Ca I lh " i " e . di ^ at the home of her daughter 

.he I J u a n r ke^cZrch S ,r e o„^ ad ea b r^yon C t^ Si Fun t er'a , . e ? be • 0f 

I^W^-fntd^eS^ 
Wa„„ ij c Grace Hi'eman Miller. 

dic^l Dec ^"iWTh'ts horn" " ^'"^ fT**"** 

sat ifSS¥» 
SHS«^«s|S|r S 

Tin. i -/' Daisy Smeltzer 

.-Sinter ? Mr ind ^ Ir5 Ps " 01 wa«i- 

Lizzie Lair. 



and 22 davs Deceased ,„' a B ed /S years, 9 months 
1S49 To this „iinJ, i s earned to Jacob Wilt in 

years. Sister Wil t with l„ ? , beyond over fourteen 
Brethren church n their e,rK >d ' ^^ with the 

^nmsi-iiP 

o^^glr&^-^^-'hfnle 
(Manor congregation) Sic 26 fonfi^ Ds ™i»<=. Mi. 

assisted by the brethren. InVrLnf'.n San^'^er?' 
M. Portia Rowland. 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 19, 1907. 



"The Other Half of the Globe" titan of chasms 



By Eld. D. L. Miller 



A $1.50 Book for Only 45 Cents 



DESCRIPTION. 

In workmanship the book is, in ev- 
ery particular, first-class. The best 
of book paper is used, so as to show 
up the fine pictures to the best ad- 
vantage. The book is set up in large, 
clear type and bound in good cloth. 
It contains nearly 4U0 pages and is 
about 5>4 by 8j^ inches in size. 
HOW TO GET IT. 

There is only one way to secure 
this valuable book and that is very 
easy. Just subscribe for the Messen- 
ger for one year and add 45 cents for 
the book. 

OUR COMBINATION OFFER. 
The Gospel Messenger, one 

year, $1.50 

"The Other Half of the 
Globe," 1.50 

The combination is worth, .$3.00 
We ask you, only . . «S X =0 5 
THE SECOND EDITION. 
Although we printed a verv large 
edition of " Tbe Other Half of the 
Globe," they have all been mailed 
out. A second edition of several 
thousand copies is now being ar- 
ranged for. 




RENEW NOW. 

If you have not already renewed your subscription, do so at once and get a copy 
of this second edition. 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, III. 



Christian Workers' Outline 
Booklet 

(Jan.-June) 
is now ready for mailing. 

It contains 
one page of outlines and references on each 
subject for six months, beginning with the 
first Sunday in January. 

A Christian Workers' 
organization in every congregation using 
the outline booklet as a help in stimulating 
the work would come near being ideal along 
the Christian Workers' line. 

Has Your Church 

an organization? If not, organize at once 

and get your young people to work. 

Conference has asked that an organiza- 
tion be effected in each congregation and 
has outlined of what it should consist. 
These recommendations are found in the 
booklet. Order your booklet now. 

Price, per single copy, 4 cents 

Twenty-five copies or more and less 

than fifty each, 3 cents 

Fifty copies or more and less than 

one hundred, each, 2 l / 2 cents 

One hundred or more, each, 2 cents 

Address all orders, 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 
Elgin, Illinois. 

The Boy Who Would Be King 

And Other Bible Stories 

By Elizabeth D. Rosenberger. 

Other Bible story books by the came author 
thnt have had a large sale are "Told at Twi- 
light" and "The Scarlet Line." 

A number of Bible stories are told In these 
boolcs, and In such a way that even the little 
children will become Interested and ask (or 

They are made bo simple that the children 
have no trouble In grasping the meaning. 

The chlld-mlnd must be occupied, and If 
you can get them started In the right line 
their future destiny la largely told- Begin 
reading these etorles to them before they can 
read for themselves. Even at three and four 
years they will become Interested. It will 
create a desire to know more about these no- 
oie Bible characters. It will help to lead 
them from one Bible atory to another until a 
stud '" created for Blble reading and Bible 

Price single copy. 30 eta. 
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Brethren Teachers' monthly. It Is being 
hailed with delight among the teachers and 
Sunday-school workers in general. 

ft more than fills the place of the Sunday 
School Commentary, and the Advanced and 
Pi'imary Teachers' quarterlies. These pub- 
li rations have been discontinued and the 
" Monthly " launched on a broader field of 
helpfulness for Sunday-school workers it 
general. 

BEST STEPS FORWARD. 

When ordering some books, and a copy of 
Brethren Teachers' Monthly for one year, 
Prof. W. L. Eikenberry, of the Wm. McIClnley 
High School, St. Louis, Mo., writes: 

"Allow me to say in closing that I think 
the establishment of the Teachers' Monthly 
one of the best steps forward which lias 
come to my notice, so far as the literature 
of the church is concerned. I fear that you 
cannot continue to supply it at the price you 
name, however." Very truly, 

W. L. Eikenberry. 

WILL CONVINCE YOU. 

If you are a superintendent, teacher, or 
Sunday-school worker, we want to send you 
this monthly for at least three months. We 
feel sure it will convince you that you can't 
afford to be without It. 

Subscription Price. 

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Three or more copies to one address, per 

quarter, each 13 cents 

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Send your subscription to-day to, 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE. 
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Bible Catalogue 

MAILED FREE 
Jt 
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The Grand Canyon of Arizona 

One of the Greatest 

Wonders of the World 



What famous travelers and writers have to 

say about it: 

K«' T J\ e wo " a , ers ot "le Grand Canyon cannot 

be adequately represented in symbols of 
speech nor by speech itself. The resources 
of the graphic art are taxed beyond their 
powers in attempting to portray its features 
Language and illustration combined must 

nil'** n" eIem * nts that unlte ^ make the 
'-.land Canyon the most sublime spectacle in 
nature are multifarious and exceedingly in- 
verse. ° " 

" Besides the elements of form, there are 
elements of color, for here the colors of the 
heavens are rivaled by the colors of the 
rocks. The rainbow is not more replete with 
hues. '— Maj. J. W. Powell, Scientific Ex- 
plorer. 

" The greatest tiling in the world, probably 
no other equal area on earth contains s.> many 
supreme marvels of so many kinds— so many 
astounding sights, so many masterpieces of 
Natures handiwork, so vast ami conclusive 
an encyclopedia of worhlbulhllng proeesses 
so many impressive monuments of prehis- 
toric man so many triumphs of man still In 
the tribal relation— as what I called the 
bouUiwestern Wonderland."— Chas. F. Lum- 
mis, .Editor Out West Magazine. 

The Grand Canyon may be vlalted on the 
trip to Annual Meeting at Los Angeles. You 
cannot afford to miss It. If you are interest- 
ed in this, drop a postal card for copy of' 
"Titan of Chasms," it is yours for the ask- 



W. J. BLACK, 
Passenger Traffic MancTer, Santa Te, 

1117 Bailway Exchange, Chicago, HI. 

Wanderings in Bible Lands. — By D, L. 
Miller. Regular price, morocco, $3.00; 
now, SI. 60; regular price, library, $2.60; 
now, $1.00; regular price, cloth, $2.00; 



Will There Be a 

SPECIAL TRAIN 

TO 

Butte Valley, California 

F ™^5 ETHREN WHO INTEND MOVING 

*^S£» families, household 

QO r 2£ 3, L1TE STOCK AND FARM 
IMPLEMENTS NEXT MABCH? 
A number of people who Intend to move to 
Butte Valley in the Soring have asked the 
above question. We have hml to tell them it 
was too early to answer it until we could 
heai from all who Intend to move In the 
spi inpr, as to the number of people there 
would he in their party un j number of cars 
of household goods thev would have and 
whore they expected to start from so we can 
try and arrange to consolidate these parties 



into . 



lat tri 



YOU WILL CONrEB A FAVOR AND BE 

BENEFITED YOURSELF 
If you will advise me by first mall If you 
are thinking of moving to Hutu- Valley i n tiio 
spring, giving ahoy information s.i w,- ran 
arrange to run the train through as the Breth- 
ren moved from Belleville. Kansas, to Cali- 
fornia three years ago, when thev had dally 
preaching and song service. 

All Brethren who are thinking of making 
tills move would do well to make their ar- 
rangements so as to get Into Butte Valley 
as early In March as possible that limy may 
get settled down anil their crops ready, so as 
to be ready to participate In entertaining the 

SPECIAL TRAIN TO ANNUAL MEETING 

THAT WILL STOP AT BUTTE 

VALLEY. 

Arrangements are being made for a special 

train to leave Chicago about May 1st en route 

to the Anuual Meeting, which will enable the 

lirrthren to visit Sterling, Denver, Colorado 

Springs, Tin. Garden of the Gods, IMke'a Peak 

the Royal Gorge. Fniltn nod Jimetlon City In 

l olorado; Salt Lake City. Utah; Nampa, Pay- 
ette and U'elser, Idaho; Porilanil, Oregon, and 
arrive at Butto Valley. California, In time to 
attend the dedication of the now Danker 
Church at that place and from there go to 
Sacramento and San Kran'olseo, arriving at 
Los Angeles, Saturday, May isth. 

As the Annual Meeting commences on Tues- 
day, May 21st, this will enable many people 
to visit their friends and relatives en route 
and bo at Los Angeles In time to rest up for 
the Annual Meeting. 

There will bo regular dally song and prnlso 
services on both these special trains. Write 
for particulars of both special trains to 

GEO. L. McDONAUGH, 

Colonization Agent, Union Pacific R. R. Co., 
OMAHA, NEBRASKA 




NELSON'S TEACHERS' BIBLES 



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This edition contains the following helps: 
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Treasury, written by leading scholars in America and Great 
Britain, each one a recognized authority on the subject on 
which he writes. It supplies in the most condensed and con- 
venient form all the latest information about the Bible, its 
writers, its language, the various Versions, complete Chro- 
nology, Life of Christ with Harmony of the Gospels, Life 
and Travels of Paul, etc. 

The Illustrations are reproduced from recent photographs and truly illustrate 
the articles where they appear. 

The Combined Concordance combines Complete Concordance, Subject Index, 
Scripture Proper Names, Obsolete and Ambiguous words in one A-B-C list, It 
also gives the correct pronunciation and interpretation of Scripture Proper Names 
and has over 10,000 references to the revised version where it differs from the King 
James version. 



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nre? 



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THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 19, 1907. 



NOTES NOT CLASSlFlEb 



«w«s.v*waaaju: « i m 



-~ - — —:■-<:;.:**.■ 



Victor. — Bro. Benjamin Forney began a series of meet- 
ings Dec. 9 and continued until Dec. 26. Our elder, A. C. 
Daggett, continued tlie meetings until Dec. 30, as Bro. 
Forney could not stay with us. Bro. Forney preached 
twenty-one sermons and made about thirty house-to- 
house_ visits. There were five accessions by baptism. 
Jan. 5 we held our council. Our elder being absent on 
account of sickness, Bro. C. S. Hoff had charge. A few 
church officers and Sunday-school officers for this year 
were elected: also Christian Workers' officers were elect- 
ed. Seven letters were granted. — Genevieve Winder, 
Waldo, Kans., Jan. 11. 

Woodbury.— The writer met with the dear saints in the 
above-named church at their love feast Nov. 17, and be- 
gan a series of meetings the next evening, continuing un- 
til Dec. 3. Twenty made application for church member- 
ship. Eighteen were baptized and two are yet kept back 
on account of opposition by the parents. The Woodbury 
church has a band of earnest and faithful workers. My 
visit will be long remembered for their kindness and 
Christian courtesy. — Silas Hoover, Bills, Pa., Jan. 10. 

Pleasant Valley.— Jan. 4 Bro. D. M. Shorb came to York 
and Jan. 6 delivered a very interesting sermon at the 
Hill house. Our regular services at the York house have 
been discontinued for the present.— Eva Britsch, York 
N. Dak., Jan. 12. 

Sacramento Valley church met in council Dec. 5, with 
Bro. J. Overholtzer presiding. Church officers for the 
ensuing year were elected, with a unanimous vote for the 
reelection of Bro. C. E. Gillett as our elder. Bro. W. M. 
Piatt was chosen foreman; L. Q. Custer Messenger agent; 
the writer as church correspondent. Brethren J. M. 
Shively and W. M. Piatt are to represent us at district 
meeting. Sunday school was reorganized with Bro. Lan- 
don Custer superintendent. A prayer meeting committee 
was appointed.— Emma Piatt, Princeton, Cal., Jan. 10. 

Cushing.— I have just settled down from my work on 
the frontier in Day county. I held services in the school- 
houses when not occupied by the holiday preparations. 
I visited with the people in their dugouts. There is not 
the effort put forth that should be for the salvation of the 
people on the frontier. We will never have a better op- 
portunity to build up churches than when people first set- 
tle up a country. Land is cheap out where I was, Dur- 
ham, Day county, and if brethren could go and stay with 
the work they could build up a congregation in a short 
time. I never met with a more intelligent and healthful 
looking lot of young people than at the Durham school- 
house m worship and in Sunday school.— A. W Austin 
Cushing, Okla., Jan. 12. 

Guthrie.— Bro. A. W. Austin stopped with us over last 
Sunday and preached Sunday and Sunday night. We are 
always glad for brethren to stop with us and give us some 
meetings. There was one baptized since our district meet- 
ing.— Josiah Lehman, Guthrie, Okla., Jan. 11. 

Goshen.— Sunday evening before Christmas our Sunday 
schoo gave a very interesting Christmas program. Sis- 
ter Clara Stauffer was with us on the following Lord's 
Day and gave a very practical and impressive talk of the 
needs of the city. At a recent members' meeting the ex- 
ercises were varied for the evening, and a program was 
rendered, preparatory to the coming revival. It was di- 
vided into ten subtopics. Bro. I. D. Parker delivered a 
very impressive New Year's sermon. The amount ex- 
?*?' i c ioT im P rovem ents and general expenses was 
$033.15. Cash received by Sisters' Aid Society $100 39" 
clothing, $93.75; Sunday school from January to July S100 : 
Christian Workers, $35. making a total of $959.29 Num- 
ber received by letter, 31; number received by baptism 17* 
number that have gone to other fields of labor and' re- 
ceived letters, 28; number of deaths, 5. He closed by giv- 
- n Ji r numDe j; of suggestive resolutions.— Emma Garver, 
/20 S. Mam St., Goshen, Ind., Jan. 12. 

Pasadena.— The new year has brought with it many 
changes and more responsibilities for many of us. Our 
Wednesday evening prayer meeting has been turned into 
ur Bl r^ 1a5S , wlth Bro - A - W - Vanimari as leader and Bro. 
f>t" Tr ,? stl A e f assistant - Our subject will be "The Life 
ot Lhrist. After reading the appeal in the Gospel Mes- 
senger, recently given by the St. Joe mission workers, we 
took up a collection for them, which amounted to $12 
Jan. 6 we enjoyed a good talk from Prof. Hanawalt, who 
is very enthusiastic over the new Bible department that is 
about to be inaugurated at Lordsburg College It is to 
be under the direction and control of the state district- 
Alice Vamman, 176 Bruce Ave., Pasadena, Cal., Jan. 7. 

Fairview.— The Messenger of Jan. 12 is before me and, 
as usual, chucktul of good things. It seems to me that 
it gets better all the time. In my correspondence of Jan 
o, you make me say Chas. Berry for superintendent of 
?* U r r ,r T n - d . a 3', schooI; " sh °uld read Chas. Benz.— Abraham 
Wolf, Udell, Iowa, Jan. 12. 

Vermilion.-Bro. J. Edson Ulery has just closed a ten 

days session of Bible study, giving two lessons each day 
JJro. Ulery s labors were very much appreciated, and most 
ot us will read our Bible with renewed interest Our 
Sunday school has recently been reorganized with Bro 
Clarence Schrock superintendent. Four letters of mem- 



« - v -"" t,'"""-", unci: ui ineill l(J voun 

brethren who are attending Bethany Bible School — Ev 
Lena Frantz, Beattie, Kans., Jan. 12. 

Osage.— Our series of revival meetings, which began 
Dec. 30 conducted by Bro. J. E. Neher, closed Jan 8 
Kro. I\eher preached eleven sermons. Six of our Sunday- 
school scholars accepted Christ. Dec. 30 Bro. Daniel 
Wolfe addressed the people of this congregation —Lena 
B. Nicholson, R. D. 4, McCune, Kans., Jan. 12. 



SOUTH ST. JOSEPH MISSION. 



Our New Year's dinner among the poor was a grand 
success in every way. Many of the brethren and sisters 
within reach of us sent in provisions of all kinds, and 
many others answered our call by sending in donations of 
money. We wish to thank each and all for this timely aid. 

We gave dinner to about three hundred people, and it 
did our hearts good to see those poor little, forlorn-looking 
children and sad-faced mothers enjoy such a meal as they 



seldom see. Gud pity them! They see little but sadness 
and want, and we were glad for this privilege of adminis- 
tering to their needs, and pray that this may be the means 
of coming in closer touch with their hearts. As each 
one left the tabic they were handed an apple. We began 
to serve dinner at 12:30 and continued until 4:30 in the 
evening. 

At an early hour the hall was crowded and the street 
was filled up with bootblacks, and the poorest boys of the 
city, who stood out in the drizzling rain for at least two 
hours waiting to get in for their dinner. There were 
several boxes and barrels of fruit, potatoes, meats and 
other provisions which came a little too late for the din- 
ner, so Sister Anna K. Miller, our church missionary, and 
Brother and Sister Cousin, who have charge of the Sixth 
St. Mission, made up baskets and spent the greater part of 
the day, Saturday, distributing them in the homes of the 
poor, sick and afflicted. If our dear, good brethren and 
sisters could only see these poor, poverty-stricken people 
and these poor, forsaken little children, they certainly 
would be willing to come to our rescue and help us. We 
arc so much in need of clothing. We have had a great 
deal of clothing sent in for the older ones, but very little 
for the children. For this reason we have been unable 
to clothe these little ones. 

Our protracted meetings are still going on at the mis- 
sion, and the Lord is certainly blessing our efforts. Fifty- 
three have applied for* baptism, but only eighteen have 
been baptized. Many of these are awaiting baptism, but 
there are some who will never be baptized, as some of the 
young people, who came forward, have parents who object 
to them uniting with our church on account of our plain- 
ness of dress. There are wives who are afraid to take the 
step because their husbands object. One sister, who came 
forward several weeks ago, had a very hard cross to bear. 
Her husband told her he would leave her if she united 
with our church; but she felt it her duty to be baptized, 
so came and gave her life to Jesus and was buried with 
Christ in baptism. Instead of being glad that his wife 
was going to try to live a better life, he became very an- 
gry and took his pocket knife, and cut up all her clothes, 
bedding and everything he could get his hands on, and 
also disposed of all the furniture. The mission took her 
in and have been caring for her and her three children 
until to-day, when she finally secured work. 

Our protracted efforts will close at the mission this 
week, as I leave here Saturday for Ottumwa, Iowa, to 
hold a series of meetings. From there I go to Marshall- 
town, Iowa. I expect to be gone five or six weeks. Sisters 
Anna Miller and Laura Sanger went to spend a few days 
at Sister Anna's home. We feel that these dear sisters 
certainly need this short vacation. 

Bro Wolfe, of Ottumwa, Iowa, was with us a few days, 
and preached four or five good sermons for us. Our peo- 
ple enjoyed his sermons so much, and we hope we will 
have the privilege of having him with us again in the near 
future, c. S. Garber. 

Fairview House, So. St. Joseph, Mo., Jan. 7. 



DISTRICT SUNDAY SCHOOL MEETING OF 
CALIFORNIA. 



Our meeting was held Dec. 20 at Lordsburg College in 
connection with the Bible missionary institute. Most of 
the schools of the district were represented by delegates 
of the district who gave brief reports of their work. The 
reports were very encouraging and showed growth in one 
direction or another. Some difficulties were reported, but 
if there were none of these there would be little progress. 
At our Sunday-school meetings is just the place to get 
help, and many good things were suggested at this meet- 
ing. Bro. J. W. Cline, our district secretary, was chair- 
man of the meeting. 

The following subjects were discussed: 

"The Sunday School and the Church."— E. R. Yundt. 

"The Proper Use of Sunday-school Money" — Ida Fes- 
ler. 

" Decision Day. 1 '— Susie Forney. 

"How Better Prepare Our Teachers."— Laura E. Haugh. 

The relation between the Sunday school and the church 
has come to be so close that we cannot think of one with- 
out the other, and when we are working for the good of 
one we are helping the other. 

'Our Sunday-s«hool money should be used for the great- 
est possible good, whether that be for supporting a worker 
in the foreign field or for enlarging our possibilities for 
work at home. 

Decision day is not generally observed in our schools, 
but it deserves to be considered, and when its possibilities 
for good are recognized it will be more generally observed. 
It was observed by the Lordsburg school, this fall with 
splendid results in additions to the church. The prepara- 
tion of our teachers is coming to be recognized as impor- 
tant to the best work in our schools. Training for other 
lines of work has always been considered necessary, but 
it seems we are just waking up to the need of preparation 
tor Sunday-school work. 

Do we feel ashamed of the careless, haphazard way in 
which we have done some of our work in the past? If so 
let us go to work, " STUDY to shew thyself approved unto 
God, a workman that needcth NOT to be ASHAMED 
rightly dividing the word of truth." 



Whatever will 'help us to rightly "divide that word, we 
should be doing. 

The round table was also an interesting period nf the 
day. 

The college chapel was filled to its utmost, and there 
was splendid interest the entire day. 

Quite a number of visiting brethren and sisters were 
present, and we appreciated their being with us. 

No superintendent should fail to attend these meetings 
in his district, for it rests with him to inspire his teachers 
to perseverance and better work. No teacher should fail 
to attend, for he will be able to teach just a little better for 
having been there. Susie Forney, Sec. 

Pomona, Cal., Jan. 7. 



SHORT /ISIT TO MISSOURI. 



December 21 I left my home to meet the Fredonia 
church in council the day following. We had a very 
pleasant and, I trust, profitable meeting. The Fredonia 
church has about seventy-five members, two ministers 
and several deacons. 

I left them Dec. 22 for Adrian, Mo., to attend a Bible 
institute at that place, conducted by Bro. Hoff, of Chi- 
cago. I met with the Brethren in Bible study. There was 
fair attendance. I enjoyed thirteen lessons, when Bro. 
Hoff .took his departure for home, to continue his work- 
in the Bethany Bible School. We found at Adrian a band 
of about forty members. Though not large in number, 
we believe they are strong in the faith. They have two 
elders and two young ministers. Bro. George Leutz has 
charge of the congregation, with Eld. Ira Witmore as 
his assistant. 

After enjoying the hospitality of the dear- brethren and 
sisters at Adrian,— and they know how to make visitors 
feel welcome,— I started on my way homeward Dec. 31. 
I reached Carthage," Mo., in the evening, where 'I spent 
the night in the pleasant home of Bro. Geo. Barnhart. 
Many of our brethren will remember the beautiful city 
of Carthage where our Annual Conference was held in 
1904. Bro. and Sister Barnhart are both in their sixty- 
ninth year, but they are alive to the Master's cause. We 
reached home on New Year's day at 2 P. M. 

E. E. Joyce. 
Altamont, Kans., Jan. 7. 



GRAND VALLEY, COLORADO. 



Another round of time has passed away, and we look 
back over the past year's work of the Grand Valley 
church. We have many reasons to be thankful to our kind 
heavenly Father for his mercies extended to us and for 
his blessings we have enjoyed. Peace has prevailed in our 
midst, and love and union exist. 

At the starting out of the year, Jan. 6, 1906, the western 
portion of the Grand Valley church was cut off as a sep- 
arate congregation, known as the Fruita church. The 
church building is located in the thriving little town of 
I'ruita, and surrounded with a rich farming community. 
lhe Friuta congregation is as large in numbers as the 
mother church, and we can predict a prosperous growth 
under the efheient leadership of Eld. S. Z. Sharp and his 
faithful eolaborers. They also have many bright young 
members who are active in church work, which is inspir- 
ing in any congregation. 

The First Grand Valley church, as we are known, has 
started a mission point in Grand Junction during the year 
Our aged and efficient elder, D. M. Mohler, is the most 
active figure in that mission point; and while the work is 
not as encouraging as we would like to see it, we hope 
the future may develop much good from the small begin- 
ning made. 

During the year one of our number was called away by 
death. _ Nine were received into fellowship by baptism. 
Financially our members have been blessed. And now we 
are building a new and much needed addition to our old 
church, as our old house was too small for our growing 
congregation. D . M. Click. 

R. D. 2, Grand junction, Colo. 



FROM BEATRICE, NEBR. 




lime hulk wnu were wining to work; and while we vvi 
love to have seen much more accomplished, yet the 
has marked many commendable steps forward. All' 
religious services of the church ha " 



est and attendance. 
Whil 



have" increased in inter- 

..- have no special mission worker, considerable 
work of that nature is being done, as all seem to take a 
lively interest in promoting the work. Our pastor has 
done much pastoral work, as well as house-to-house vis- 
iting, distributing tracts, etc. 

Sentiment is growing favorable to the church in the 
community in which the church is located, as well as in 
the city. 

We feet truly grateful and appreciative for the kindly 
assistance rendered us during the years by the dear mem- 
bers of our own little Hock, as well as the North and South 
Beatrice churches. 

At the kind solicitation "of the mission board and the 
Beatrice church, we have consented to remain another 
year, and do greatly desire that the Spirit may guide us 
and enrich our souls with divine fullness, that the work at 
Beatrice may grow. We earnestly pray heaven's blessing 
to rest upon the work and workers. 

Mrs. L. D. Bosserman. 

1511 Grant St., Beatrice, Nebr., Jan. 8. 



The Gowel Messenger 



"SLT FOR THE DEFENSE OF THE GOSPEL."— PhiL 1: 17. 



Vou 46. 



B..GIN, 111., January 26, 1907. 



No 4. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. hundred million pounds of sugar. There are more 

Editorial,— than a dozen sugar factories, the four largest ones 

Wanted, — A Church and School Building and Hos- i lp |,,„ ,, uv,,*. fxn:„ P r ^,,„i„ i i . i c ■ i 

pital and Dispensary Home at Bulsir, India, . . 57 bem S at ' 0rt <-0llins, Loveland, Longmont and Swulk, 

A Problem 57 More tl,an a hundred thousand acres were planted in 

Persia 57 sugar beets in Colorado; the average -yield was a 

Appeals for Money 58 little over thirteen tons to the acre. Colorado also 

Los Angeles and the Brethren 58 has a re p u tation as a potato-growing- State, the pota, 

rransfer-nng Membership, 58 , . , ,^ , ,. . ^ 

Without a Church Letter, .58 toes gmw > ln the <>™eley '''Strict rivaling all others 

A Marriage Contrary to the Gospel, ." 58 m the wodd in quality and quantity. Three thousand 

Manner of Voting, 58 carloads were grown there in 1905, and five hundred 

Essays, — carloads less in 1906. The gold and silver mines are 

Disappointment in Religion. By John Hcckman, . .30 no longer the great wealth producers of the State 

Evangelistic Notes. By H. M. Barwick 30 Am , t „ ot a ve t whn< , ^ ^ mi 

Freeze-out. By Nancy D. Underbill, o! - , , , . . - . 

Enemies of the Common Good. By Wilbur 3. considered a part of the great American desert. Ir- 

Stover, Si rigation has accomplished wonders there and in many 

A Picture of Two Souls. By A. G. Cross white, ...52 other places. 

Christian Giving. By Peter Brower, o.i 

The Round Table,— Tramps have become so numerous in France that 

A Christian. By C. H. Balsbaugh, 14 they are a menace to property and life, it being esti- 

Living Up to Our Profession. By Andrew A._ mated that there are more than two hundred thousand 

WhatT Misied. ' By David' ByerYy" " " '. '.'.'"'". '.'.'. M ° f them in ^ COuntr y- The government lias thirty- 

What Is It Worth? By U. T. Forney, 54 two thousand rural guards whose duty it is to protect 

A Suggestion. By J. E.Young, 54 the people against the tramps. The number of 

A "Real Estate Preacher." By Wm. K. Conner, ..54 guards will likely be largely increased in order to 

Home and Family,— check vagrancy. During last year more than thirty 

Ready-to-Halt. By Elizabeth p. Rosenberger, ....55 thousand tramps were arrested in France, but the 

a. ma jority of them could not be held, because there was 

General Missionary and Tract Department, — • , -i.il. ■*■* i t 1 , . i i 

n . ■ ,- , c i -n n0 evidence against them. More no doubt would have 

Dividing the surplus, ?y ° 

" How I Found the Brethren." By James R. Singh, 59 been arrested were it not for the fact that in many 

From Brooklyn, N. Y. By Elizabeth Howe, 59 places there is no prison in which to confine them. 

Emm Newport News, Va. By Wm. K. Comivr, ..59 "America also has i host /ij£ tramps There arc . ; hm1 to 

11 be at the present time more than twenty thousand in 

A R O UN D THE WORI D Chicago. Some of them when not given what they 

■uM MKx^ c^ bOLi ^j aa^ upti^^ ask for injure the one refusing. The tramp problem 

r ,„ m c t. a ii -ii , j- is a serious one, and will be much more so in hard 

Last Saturday there were ten railroad wrecks, four 

of them in Indiana, bringing death and injury to pas- . 

sengers and trainmen. The two worst wrecks were 
on the Big Four. A fast passenger train ran past sig- 
nals set against it and crashed into a freight train at 
Fowler, Ind. Several persons were killed and others 
injured. Some were burned to death in the wreck, 
it being impossible to get them from under the cars, 
but one of which was not burned. The other wreck 
was east of Terre Haute. A passenger train was run- 
ning by a freight train on the sidetrack. A large 
amount of powder on the freight train exploded when 
the two trains were almost abreast; Several more 
persons were killed and others injured. It is supposed 
that dynamite must have been shipped with the pow- 
der and was in some way set off. Wrecks grow more 
numerous. It is indeed time that steps were taken to 
fix the responsibility for them and so prevent the kill- 
ing and injuring of those who travel. 



The shah of Persia died not long after signing the 
new constitution. His successor promises to be an 
industrious ruler. He is determined to maintain order, 
even if he must have some heads chopped off in order 
to do it. Persia needs a progressive and energetic 
man at the head of affairs. Progress has been greatly 
retarded by disturbances. With a greater amount of 
freedom and a shah who can govern well, Persia 
ought to make rapid advancement. And its greatest 
good lies in not Jetting any strong foreign power 
decide what its policy shall be. Foreign governments 
are jealously watching and advancing their own in- 
terests. The shah's eldest son, though his mother i-. 
not a royal princess, will probably be named crown 
prince, since his father wishes it. 



Great gains were made by the prohibitionists 
during the year 1906. The following are some of the 
encouraging facts : Thirty million people in the 
United States live under prohibition. Kentucky is 
more than three-fourths a prohibition State. Sunday 
closing has been rigidly enforced in a number of 
large cities. More than a score of prohibitionists were 
elected to the legislatures of nine States at the last 
election. There is a big increase of prohibition ter- 
ritory in Tennessee, Arkansas, Georgia and other 
Southern States. Indiana has six hundred and forty- 
nine townships and forty cities without the saloon, and 
Ohio has twelve hundred " dry " townships. If good 
local option laws are passed by the legislatures of 
States not now having them, there will be large parts 
of many Northern States without saloons. The people 
of each township ought to be permitted to put the 
saloons out if they wish to, and they will have that 
right in the not distant future. 



The raising of sugar beets has become an importnat 
industry in parts of the West. Last year Colorado 
raised nearly a million and a half tons of them, and 
from the beets the factories produced more than three 



' Agriculture is the greatest industry in Japan, 
giving employment to more than sixty per cent of the 
population. The government fosters the application 
of scientific principles to farming. Roads and water- 
ways used for agricultural purposes have been re- 
arranged and straightened, the use of machinery has 
been promoted, and measures have been taken to pre- 
vent damage by flood. State experimental farms have 
been established for the purpose of investigating seeds, 
diseases, and insect pests, and for improving the 
breeding of stock. Institutes have been established 
for the training of experts in silkworm rearing and 
filature. The output and quality of the silk produced 
are increasing. Experiments are conducted at the 
state farms in the rearing of tea plants and in the 
improvement of manufacturing machinery. The 
Japanese believe in finding the best way of doing 
things, and to this is due their wonderful progress. 



About a month ago something was said about the 
famine in China. During June, July, August and part 
of September very heavy rains fell and Hooded the 
northern districts of Kiangsu and Anhui provinces. 
The crops had not been gathered, and this meant 
want for a people who are not able to provide very 
far ahead. The price of food had doubled by Novem- 
ber, and many were living on one meal a day; and 
often this meal was composed of gruel and sweet- 
potato leaves. Thousands left their homes to beg 
elsewhere. Some sold their children; some threw 
their children into the water and then committed 
suicide. Farmers have sold their work animals to 
buy food and have no wheat to plant for next year's 
crop. In various parts of our country money is being 
collected to aid the" sufferers. Any sums sent to 
Hallam Keep, national treasurer of the Red Cross, 
Washington, D. C, will be used for the purpose 
intended. 



Kingston, the capital of Jamaica, one hundred miles 
south of Cuba, was visited by a severe earthquake 
on the afternoon of Jan 14. As in San b'rancisco, 
the earthquake was followed by a destructive fire, and 
the city was almost destroyed. Jamaica has an area 
of only a little over four thousand square miles, and 
Kingston with a population of mure than fifty thou- 
sand is situated on the southeast coast. The island 
was first settled by the Spaniards in 1509, but in 1655 
Penn and the Venables got possession and an English 
colony was planted. By that time the Spaniards ha. 1 
killed off the original inhabitants and were themselves 
reduced to fifteen hundred persons, with about as 
many slaves. Port Royal, the former capital, became 
the center of an important slave trade, and the buc- 
caneers of those days were welcome guests there. In 
the city was to be found " the worst depravity that 
ever disgraced a seaport." 

Then in 1692 a great earthquake destroyed Port 
Royal. Of its three thousand houses only two hundred 
were left standing. Then Kingston was founded. 
Ninety years later the city was nearly burned up. 
In 1815 a very severe hurricane visited Jamaica. The 
island was deluged, hundreds of houses were washed 
away and a thousand persons were drowned. In 1845 
a fire caused about fifteen million dollars damage. In 
1880 a cyclone passed over the eastern part of Jamaica, 
destroying the wharves and much shipping, and just 
missing Kingston, A hurricane in 1903 damaged 
thousands of houses in Kingston. And last November 
the sharpest earthquake shock of many years was felt 
in the south and north of the island. But all these 
disasters did not keep people away from Jamaica. It 
was a favorite winter resort. 

Bur now has come the greatest calamity of all. No 
one can tell how many lives have been lost; but 
several hundred bodies have been recovered from the 
ruins and buried. The total number can hardly be 
known until all the wreck is cleared away. American 
warships were at once despatched to Kingston to help, 
and supplies were ordered. American sailors and 
doctors did good service until ordered away by the 
governor, when the ships returned to Guantanamo, 
Cuba. The governor's action is regretted by the people 
of Jamaica and by the English government. Reports 
have come that the south side of the island is sinking 
and that there will be no harbor at Kingston. Time 
must tell how badly the harbor is injured. If the re- 
port is true, it will be a greater misfortune than the 
loss of all the property. Jamaica is a pleasant and 
fruitful land, and will soon recover from the disaster; 
and the works of man, laid in ruins by the quake, will 
be replaced by others greater and more beautiful. 






mm 




THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 26, 1907. 



ESS A VS 



SPEAK KINDLY. 

BY MARY M. COX. 

Speak a word to encourage your brother, 

It may be he's tired of the strife. 
If the world's coldly frowning upon him, 

A kind word may give him new life. 
By giving him strength to press onward 

Against evils without and within, 
You may cause him to win in Che conflict, 

Which daily he's righting with sin. 

The heart that is bowed down with sorrow, 

The soul that is burdened with care, 
May be lifted and lightened by kindness; 

Oh, help such their burdens to bear. 
The world is your field of labor, 

A great tield of sorrow and woe; 
Then help in his trials your neighbor, 

Give kind words of cheer as you go. 

Oh, speak a kind word to the erring, 

You know not the cause of their tall. 
Bear in mind that the mercies tender 

Uf the Father are over us all. 
Then stoop down and lift up the fallen; 

'Twas for such that the dear Savior died, 
And if you would share in his pardon 
You must daily walk close by his side. 

So many are almost despairing. 

Oh, do not leave such to their fate; 
A word fitly spoken may save them. 

Speak that word, then, before it's too late. 
The kind words so easily spoken, 

Who can tell all the good they may do? 
Then scatter them thickly, my brother; 

To your God-given mission be true. 



DISAPPOINTMENT IN RELIGION. 
BY JOHN HECKMAN. 

Disappointment is a kind of defeat that but few 
are not forced to accept occasionally, a " Slough of 
Despond " that none can wholly escape. Friendships 
are made, only to come to an untimely end. Marriages 
are contracted, the unlooked for happens; neither will 
take the first step to make a sacrifice and yield to the 
best interests of both, and fate marks the life as one 
of disappointment. Men and women meet disappoint- 
ment in finances, in education, in worldly honor, in 
love, in seeking pleasure, in seeking health. Parents 
. are disappointed in their children ; children are disap- 
pointed in their parents; the church is sometimes 
disappointed in its members; the members are some- 
times disappointed in their preacher; it's a life of 
many disappointments. Jesus Christ has never disap- 
pointed a person yet; and never will. Some people 
have been disappointed with the church, because they 
did not get what they expected or what they wanted , 
but Jesus never disappointed. them, or any one else. 

It was in the early 70's. A religious enthusiasm had 
spread over the neighborhood. A feeling had settled 
itself, almost unconsciously, in the minds of the people 
of the community that they were in need of some- 
thing that they did not have. There was something 
lacking. There were a score or more of young people 
too, who, it seemed, cared for little else than to have a 
good time, yet the religious influence was not lost with 
them, but had its desired effect. There was the ever- 
present human desire reaching up to God for help to 
a better life. They attended the meetings and were 
soon being carried along by the wave of religious en- 
thusiasm. The preachers manifested less knowledge 
than zeal. The meetings continued for many days. 
Many were led to the " mourner's bench " to bewail 
their sad and lost condition and to seek the Lord in 
prayer. Long and loud were their petitions, sent to a 
beneficent Father in heaven who must have looked 
upon them with pity. Could they have remained in 
such ecstatic joys to the end of life, all might have 
ended well enough. But they were to go back to the 
old battles of life and put the newly-acquired religion 
to the test that tries every man's religion. The motives 
of life had not been changed. Enthusiasm and zeal 
could not be substituted for reformation from sin and 
obedience to the simple commands of the Lord. The 
" mourner's bench " religion could not be made to take 
the place of the hidden spirit life that starts a soul 
towards God, not to be turned back by temptation or 
trial. 

Scores of both old and young were numbered among 



the converts. But the whole Gospel was not taught. 
The words of the commission were not carried out— 
" Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I 
have commanded you." Those people were not taught 
to observe the " all things," and, therefore, could not 
be assured the abiding presence of the Lord. " And, 
lo, I am with you always." 

The result. A few of the older ones held to the 

cause which they had espoused, but the great majority 

fell away into sin, and have gone to greater lengths 

than before. How could it be otherwise? A weak 

solution of the religion of Jesus Christ will not save 

men, neither for the life that now is, nor for the life 

that is to come. Religion did not do for them what 

they expected. They were disappointed. And a sad 

disappointment it was. In the language of the one 

who told the story, " I went into the meeting to get 

all that was in it. I felt that 1 needed it. When the 

meeting was over, I had nothing. I was disappointed." 

Many of those people have become scoffers, and 

some have become infidels. Their children have come 

after them in much the same spirit. Religion of any 

kind is held in disrepute in this community. Morality 

is at low ebb. Good citizenship is a rarity. The 

Sabbath is disregarded. The homes lack the charm of 

Christian love and culture. The young men and 

fathers lack the gentility to which Christianity lends 

sucii a helping hand. The young women and mothers 

lack the beauty and grace which conies through a 

contented mind and loving spirit, accompaniments of 

the power and influence to impart the seeds of divine 

life to her children. These the Lord brought from 

heaven that he might give them to her to be her very 

own, her rightful diadem, to crown her " Queen of the 

Home." 

Sad disappointment! Lost opportunity! Blighted 
hope! And all because those people, nearly fortv 
years ago, were disappointed in their religion. Far- 
reaching in its results! 

Another case illustrating the above. During the 
winter of 1894 and 1895 a so-called religious revival 
was carried on in a churchl.buse. Enthusiasm waxed 
hot. The waves ran high. Sixty-six persons were 
counted and enrolled as converts. During the follow- 
ing year I conducted a two and a half weeks' series of 
meetings in the same house. My congregations were 
made up largely of the same people as that of th- 
former meeting. But few members could assist me in 
this meeting, as it was on the outskirts of the con- 
gregation. At that time, within a year from' the 
extended revival, there were, to my positive knowledge, 
just four persons who maintained their membership 
with that denomination. Not one of them came to 
the Brethren church. The cause of the Brethren was 
greatly hindered by this extensive falling away. Dis- 
trust in everything religious was the result, a serious 
and difficult condition. And now, after nearly twelve 
years of time, the two churchhouses within a furlon^ 
of each other are actually crumbling down for warn 
of occupants. 

A few years later another denomination came in 

built a house of worship, and thought to build a church 

from, the ruins of the other two. This too, from lack 

of interest and support, is going the same road to ruin. 

Some conclusions: 

Nothing short of a whole Gospel will really satisfy. 
Enthusiasm and prayer cannot be substituted for 
gospel repentance and conversion. 

Enthusiasm and loud profession cannot he sub- 
stituted for vital piety and right living. 

Christ must abide in the life to be able to fight sin 
successfully. 

Disappointment in religion causes distrust in every- 
thing religious. 

Some people will not accept the good offices of those 
who would do them the very good they most need. 

True religion is sometimes condemned with the 
counterfeit. Counterfeit religion is sometimes accepted 
instead of the true. 

Believers who repent and undertake to live godly 
lives according to the Bible should be baptised and 
received into church fellowship. Others should be 
rejected. 

It is difficult to build up one church on the ruins of 
another. 



It is hard to see how a greater injury can be done 
to a church, and to the individuals themselves, than 
to have an unscrupulous preacher receive into church 
fellowship those who have not been converted to her 
principles. 

An unscrupulous preacher, working to add numbers 
alone to a church membership, may do a lasting injury 
to the best and highest good of a community. It is 
but to invite them to disappointment, for the Lord 
cannot bless them, except they be converted. 

Jesus will abide with and bless them who will be 
grafted into, and ever abide in, the vine 

Polo, 111. 



EVANGELISTIC NOTES. 
BY H. M. BARWICK. 

In his letter to the Ephesians Paul says, "And he 
gave some to be evangelists," and again in writing to 
Timothy he says to the young preacher, " Do the work 
of an evangelist." The church of Jesus Christ, there- 
fore, has a place for evangelists and their services, as 
well as a place for pastors and teachers, although at the 
present time the call is almost exclusively for pastors. 
It is not my purpose to discuss the relation of pastor 
to evangelist, or the happy combination of both gifts 
in the same individual, but to offer a few suggestions 
which experience has taught me as helpful in a series 
of meetings. 

Man's mind is logical in its nature and to reach an 
audience with the Gospel, the preacher must approach 
them naturally and logically. A sermon that is closeh 
connected in its parts and fits together well in all of 
its connections is more readily received by an audience 
and with better effect than a sermon that goes hit and 
miss and has neither natural beginning nor logical 
conclusion. Just so a series of meetings ripens into 
fuller fruitage if the needs of the audience are 
logically and definitely met by a line of thought that 
inevitably leads up to the cross of Christ in its fullness. 
Especially is this true with ministers of the Brethren 
church, for there are so many excursion rates to 
heaven and easy ways of salvation offered in the 
popular pulpit of this day that the untutored mind is 
shy when a full Gospel is presented to him. 

I have found the following lines of thought very 
helpful to me in reaching the largest .number : 

1. Begin the meeting with a few sermons on the de- 
structive nature ofsin. " The wages of sin is death," 
and kindred texts, are corroborated by reference- 
to the murders, thefts, vice, unhappy homes, wrecked 
health, orphans, etc., police courts, criminal, expense, 
rescue homes, reform schools, confessions of penitents, 
and everyday life. Everybody will join in the sen- 
timent that we do not need sin, nor do we want it. 

2. Then portray the holiness of God's character, in 
creation, in giving man moral endowments, in the 
moral order of the universe, and his promise of a 
holy life hereafter. No one doubts the wisdom and 
fatherhood of God. 

3. Next show the transforming power of the 
Gospel. How it is divinely ordained to keep man 
upright. How a higher civilization has followed in 
the wake of the Gospel in all countries, and how can- 
nibalism melts away under the influence of the cross. 
Illustrate this point by individual lives that became 
happy and useful after they received Christ. This is 
a very easy and fruitful argument and one that ought 
to be used to its fullest extent in persuading people to 
forsake a sinful life. 

4. Follow this up with Christ's teaching of aban- 
donment of the sinful ways of the world. " My king- 
dom is not of this world." " Ye are not of this world." 
" Our citizenship is in heaven." " Set your affections 
on things above." Show that the Christian life is a 
distinct life, a peculiar life, " zealous of good works." 
" Christ came to save sinners " and not to enjoy him- 
self. " Christ pleased not himself." Our age needs 
much teaching along this line, for there is too much 
compromising with questionable living by the church 
people. Make prominent the fact that the Christian 
life is an active life in virtue and charity and not one 
of passive consent. " Herein is my Father glorified, 
that ye bear much fruit." 

5. Lastly comes the teaching of church ordinances 
as God's ordained means of unifying his people and 






NSVF1 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 26, 1907. 



keeping" them alive in grace. If the first four stages 
of the meeting have been properly presented, there 
will be a readiness for this fifth line of thought. 
Ordinances do not save in the same sense that faith 
and repentance save the sinner, but they are food and 
life to the saint in his new life, for " happy are ye 
if ye do them." 

Suggestions as to conducting services, question 
boxes, house-to-house visiting, etc., could also be given, 
but after all it is the gospel matter presented that 
converts people to God, and that matter comes largely 
from the pulpit, so that we want to strengthen our 
pulpit work as much as possible, for if the message 
is rightly given and then supplemented by the 
preacher's godly deportment, other matters shape 
themselves. 

McPherson, Kans. 



FREEZE-OUT. 
BY NANCY D. UNDERHILL. 

We do not know much about the technicalities of 
this popular game, not having been in the habit of 
playing it since the verdant season of youth, when we 
ought to have known better. But we know a few 
people who are accustomed to indulge in Sluff and 
Freeze-out. They are not people of whose acquain- 
tance one is proud. Two of these gentlemen were 
once riding in a funeral procession behind two ladies, 
one of whom was a recent comer to the place. After 
listening some time to their continual conversation in 
their usual tone, the newcomer remarked to her com- 
panion, "I think they are rather loud; don't you?" 
Unwilling to speak evil of any man, the lady 
hesitatingly replied, " I don't know." But the piercing 
look which she received, made her continue, " I think 
they are a little coarse." " That is what I meant," 
said the first speaker. 

The game of freeze-out, which the writer played 
over a quarter of a century ago, was directed against 
another young woman, because of a little foolish mis- 
understanding. A picnic was planned, to which all 
the young people in the neighborhood, except this one 
young lady, were invited. She was frozen out. Years 
afterward, when the wisdom of maturity had softened 
the heart and developed a sense of shame and sorrow 
for wrongdoing, an effort was made to find the once 
wronged neighbor, that her pardon might be obtained. 
A letter was sent on a long journey to a doubtful 
address where it remained awhile uncalled for, then 
took another long journey to the capital of the nation, 
finally returning to the writer from the dead letter 
office at Washington. So, the game of freeze-out 
usually proves disappointing at the end. 

When we wish to recall the time and efforts which 
we worse than wasted, we start a petition in search of 
the grieved one. By and by, after much anxiou= 
waiting, we receive the answer to our prayers from the 
capital of our country (heaven), informing us that the 
one: we helped to bury while yet alive, is dead. Then 
how the heart can ache. How we wish we had not 
been so anxious to get rid of this poor, inoffensive 
member — that we had not thrown the clods that helped 
to ostracise one of our Lord's dear children. How 
cruel to bury people while yet alive ! 

" Freeze-out! " In many of our churches there are 
a few elderly people who do not seem to approve of 
every new idea and who do not freely mingle with 
every social function. They are doubtful of the wisdom 
of some things in which some of the younger members 
can see " no harm." They seem to be afraid of a 
worldward tendency upon the part of the church, but 
they dearly love to attend all its meetings, and to have 
a part in all the services. Having passed the youthful 
state, they take no pleasure in anything except thai 
which is of a religious nature. The fellowship of 
God's children is heaven to their souls. But the 
younger members are very resentful, because some of 
their doings have not met with the most hearty 
approval. They are inclined to let the older members 
understand that the church could get along without 
them. The elderly members love the old songs. 
Fondly do they remember how some of those blessed 
hymns had a part in their conversion. They recall 
with gladness the times when in all patience they taught 
their little ones to sing the old hymns at the hour of 



morning worship, and how they encouraged their 
classes in the dear Sunday-school to join in the singing. 
Flow they used to start up one of those old hymns 
whenever there was an awkward pause in the prayer 
meeting service, before the new-fashioned one-man 
idea of conducting a prayer meeting with just a hand- 
ful of silent members staring blankly at the minister 
became prevalent. But now they are reminded that 
silence upon their part would be more agreeable to 
the younger portion of the flock, that their voice is 
no longer musical, and the old songs are not desirable. 
Sadly they realize that they are being laid upon the 
shelf of inactivity before their time, being frozen out 
of the Sunday school and the prayer meeting. The 
hush of death is upon them, for their voices must no 
longer be heard. They have no part in the praise of 
their Creator, and they feel that their presence at 
the services of their beloved church is no longer 
desirable. 

Frozen out ! and yet keenly alive to every interest 
of the heavenly kingdom. They cease to attend the 
services. Some say " they have backslidden." Others 
think they are just grooving old and do not care to 
go. Some think they have taken offense, and say, 
" Old Mr. Brown flew off the handle again: quit 
going to church." " Old Mrs. White has left us, just 
as we expected. She always was a flighty thing any- 
how ; no stability of character, always ready to be 
wafted about with every wind of doctrine. Well, we 
don't care. She wasn't anybody, anyway. Once, some 
thirty years ago or more, they say that she did or said 
something which she ought 'not to have done or said. 
We can get along just as well without her. Yes, and 
better: she is awfully ignorant." So the frozen-out 
member, hearing these uncharitable remarks — for 
gossip will make itself heard — feels cut to the quick, 
and cannot bear to go there anymore, although the 
heart yearns with an unutterable longing for the 
fellowship of the saints, the society of the dear ones 
in the church which the heart has loved and toiled for 
so many years. In the loneliness and sorrow of des- 
peration, perhaps they turn to another church, but 
the old tree is not successfully transplanted. A broken 
heart precedes a funeral. 

What shall we say to Jesus when one says, " My 
youthful mistakes were naked before you, and you 
flaunted them before the world." You did not cover 
and shield me. My heart was hungry for the bread 
of kindness which you did not give. My soul thirsted 
for your fellowship, and ye withheld it. I was sick 
at heart in the prison of my own sorrows, and ye did 
not come to see me. I was cold and naked and a 
stranger before you, and you did not take me in." 
" Inasmuch as ye did it not unto one of the least of 

these " Can we afford to say that we do not 

need" that soul for whom Jesus laid down his life, that 
one who needs our love and kindness, our sympathy 
and friendship? Can we afford to repulse them, 
turning coldly away from their need and excusing 
ourselves upon the ground that they are ignorant or 
weak, or old and useless, or not very steadfast or 
otherwise not wholly agreeable to us? 

If a soul needs our help, our sympathy, our kind- 
ness, why do we turn from him and let him see that 
we are guilty of despising one of our Lord's little ones. 
If he has given us an opportunity to be kind or 
courteous to any soul, we ought to consider it a 
privilege to do so. Who knows what blessing might 
reward our Christlikeness ! 

Brother, sister, are you playing freeze-out? If so, 
may our Father forgive you and may our Lord in pity 
not turn away from you and repulse you as others 
have been repulsed by you. 

Collbran, Colo. 



ENEMIES OF THE COMMON GOOD. 
BY WILBUR B. STOVER. 

[A serman preached before the native congregation at 
Bulsar, India, Sept. 23, 1906, from the text, "He whose 
spirit is without restraint is like a city that is broken down 
and without walls."— Ptov. 25: 28.] 

By the grace of God, I would call your attention 
this morning to the fact of the text, that the mind 
rules the body, and if a man has not the rule of his 
mind, what restraint can he have upon his body ! He 



indeed is like a city with its walls broken down. He 
is like a town lot without a fence around it. He is 
like a rice field without any banks to hold the water in. 

The mind is the monitor to the body. If the mind 
be evil, the tongue will say bad words sometimes. If 
the mind be evil, the hand will do mischief sometimes. 
If the mind be evil, if it be without restraint, the man 
is at once an object of pity to thinking men. lie 
whose spirit is within control is like a strong city, his 
position is one to be desired, he is in a place of safety. 

I would like to point out for our general good thi< 
morning, two enemies who have not overcome us, 
but concerning whom we do well to be on guard. 
They are two enemies of the common good, two 
enemies of our spiritual life. The first of them is 



There are not many men but are tempted to get 
angry at times. But when we say tempted, we give 
the right sound, for to be angry is to yield to tempta- 
tion. It is a temptation, and it comes from the wicked 
one. It is a temptation, and it does us evil and not 
good. It does evil both to our body and to our spirit. 
To get angry is to become weak, weaker than we were 
before. When a man gets angry he is almost sure to 
make a fool of himself 1 

Take the example of Naaman, when he went to 
Elisha to be healed. He had plenty of money and ex- 
pected to pay. But the prophet of God was not money- 
hungry. His uppermost thought was the glory of his 
Father above. And when he selit word to Naaman 
to go and wash in the Jordan, even to just dip himself 
in it seven times, the thing looked foolish to Naaman, 1 
and so he turned and went away in a rage. Flow many 
hours or how many days he continued in his anger, 
I do not know, but I know that his servants reasoned 
with him, and finally he came to himself," his anger 
cooled down, and he went and did as the man of God 
had said, and came forth clean. Just as many hours 
or just as many days as he continued in his anger, 
just that many hours or just that many days of un- 
necessary sorrow did he have added to the sorrows of 
life! While he continued in anger, he made a com- 
plete fool of himself ! 

I have heard of a case in the State of Ohio where 
a good Dunker brother gave out by contract the 
clearing of a certain piece of timber land. He knew 
it would be hard and slow work, so he gave the big 
end of the bargain to an old neighbor who was very 
glad to get the job. And now, cutting down trees has 
some fascination in it, but digging up stumps doesn't! 
And when it came to digging out the stumps the work ' 
went slowly, and the old man got tired of his job. 
So he sought sympathy by telling sonic other men who 
were dissatisfied with their work, and together they 
wrought up their feelings against their several em- 
ployers to a white heat. One day Jainholtz, for 'that 
was his name, came hustling down the road eager 
to meet his employer, this good brother, and to fight 
it out with him. And when he saw him near the 
house, he jumped over the fence near to the gate, and 
went running up to the brother, and shaking with rage 
shouted out to him, " You penurious little liar! " He 
was so mad that was all he could say I 

The other was of a different spirit. Bless the Lord 
for the men of quiet spirit, who always make for 
peace and not for war. Presently he said to his 
antagonist, " Jainholtz, what is the matter with you 
now!" And they proceeded to reason together, the 
one to talk as a reasonable man, the other to yell 
and shout wildly in his angry spirit. But they went 
in and sat down, and talked matters over. 

The Dunker brother asked about the other's 
chickens, and offered him a bag of corn, for which lie 
was thankful. They talked about several things, and 
when they talked of the clearing again, the other man 
said to the brother, " I am the liar, not you. I am 
the liar, not you." And so they were at peace again. 
And when Jainholtz went home, he went out by way 
of the gate. I tell you, a good name is rather to 
be chosen than two bags of corn ! But when you get 
angry, you spoil your good name exceedingly. 

There is not a man in the congregation this morning 
but who when he has gotten angry has thought some- 
thing or said something or done something that, in 



Mta 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 26, 1907. 



his better moments that followed, he wished he hail 
done otherwise! You ma)' have a reputation for 
gentleness, which is so desirable, but if you allow 
yourself to become angry, that reputation will go. 
You may have a reputation for soberness, but if you 
get angry at times, that good reputation is bound to 
go. You can't be sober and you can't be gentle, and 
be angry now and then ! It would not pay you to do 
it if you could, but you can't do it! 

God knows the heart of man. The Bible knows what 
the heart is prone to. So when the Bible wants to 
give us a bit of advice on getting angry, it very 
wisely says: " Be angry and sin not." Sure you are, 
when you get angry, to spoil your good name, to 
commit all kinds of shameful things which you will 
feel sorry for later on, therefore, don't get angry. 
But if you get angry, then be careful, for you linger 
on dangerous ground. And God does not want you 
to spoil your good name, he does not want you to sin, 
he does not want you to get angry and disgrace both 
yourself, his Son, and himself, your Father. 

Some of us are parents. I will take an illustration 
from my childhood days, when father had gone to 
his heavenly home, and mother had four little boys 
to raise all by herself. We had gotten into some mis- 
chief, and mother had punished us with a whipping. 
Then we went out and sat under a window to talk it 
over, we boys together, and this is what we said, as 
mother told us afterwards: " Wilbur, did it hurt you 
much ? " " No, not much, but Allen, it always make-* 
me cry. I tell you what I wish. I wish she wouldn't 
taftc so long before she whips. It's the talk that makes 
a fellow cry, not the whipping." " I guess that's about 
it, for mamma don't whip very hard." 

Beloved, it's the talk that goes to the tender place, 
not the whipping! It is the talk that does the good. 
The whipping has its place. I got it, and Emmert gets 
it. 1 believe in occasional whipping, but never, if 
the parent is angry! For a school-teacher or parent 
to get angry and punish a child is sheer weakness of 
mind and strength of the brute! The child cannot 
respect a superior who punishes in anger. Appeal 
to the sense of right, show your love and sympathy, 
weep with your child because you (lave to punish it, 
and then punish sparingly! No? It can't be done 
that way ? Do you think it is not practicable to do it 
that way ? Then you have room to grow in grace right 
here! 

Another thing. You cannot trust a man who gets 
angry. For when in anger he will betray all your 
confidence, and destroy in a few minutes what -was 
years in building. He may be very kind when not in 
his passion. He may be exceedingly charitable when 
not angry. He may be very religious until his anger 
fit comes on. Then look out ! Altogether, let us pity 
the angry man rather than condemn him. Let us say 
it is his weakness rather than his fault. He gives 
himself so much needless misery while in his passion, 
that we need not try to increase his torment. Brother, 
you be sure not to get angry any more! 

Now I said we would show two common enemies. 
We have finished with the one, who can guess what 
the other will be 5 They are akin to each other, but 
they are not alike. No, not jealousy, not strife, not 
wrath,— they are related to one another, real blood 
relation, but they are not selfsame. The other is 



We may count it strange, but I know it is true, the 
person who has a proud heart is sure to get a bit 
angry if you tell him about it. In the same way the 
man of the angry spirit has a measure of pride about 
him that would surprise you. Anger and pride hold 
each other's hands as they jog along together. 

According as a man is in his heart, so is he. If 
one have a proud heart, he is proud, no matter how he 
may adjust himself to show off otherwise. When the 
man of proud heart is pressed to the point, his pride 
wdl assert itself, though sometimes he may succeed in 
hiding the fact for many a year. If a man be proud 
at heart, he is sure to get caught up when he least 
expects it. " Be sure your sin will find you out," you 
know, is a Bible maxim we have learned. 

How often has a proud, stiff tree stood high above- 
some of its humble neighbors, casting its shadow over 
them, looking down on them with scorn, till the storm 



came! Before the storm its humble neighbor trees 
bend, and sway, and yield themselves completely, but as 
the wind blows over they straighten up again, feeling 
good for having had the exercise. The storm leaves 
the proud, unbending tree a wreck upon the ground, 
while its less pretentious neighbors wonder how they 
could have survived. This is the story of the proud 
heart. It surrenders no opinion, it recognizes no other 
wisdom than its own, only its own conviction can be 
of the Lord! After it is gone, there will be others 
standing. 

The proud heart is a deceiving thing. If you are 
proud, you like to cheat a little. 1 mean to say, you 
try to deceive others, and are not always successful at 
it. A case in point is this: You go to have your 
picture taken. I do not say it is wrong to do so, but 
in doing so, in the endeavor to show the outside you 
most plainly show the inside. Suppose a boy whose 
religion forbids his wearing rings goes to have his 
picture taken. He borrows three rings, and a walking 
stick, and a long coat, and a gold bordered hat, and 
an umbrella and a watch chain. Then he is ready! 
And ready for what? To. exhibit his borrowed 
property! You know when I see a picture like that, 
with rings, walking stick, bordered hat cocked to one 
side, long coat and all in first place on the picture, 
I always wonder if they are borrowed! I always 
wonder why the person could not have gotten a little 
more together, and kept himself out of it! He could 
have marked it, " These things are mine," and signed 
his name? Ah, you see what I am driving at? If 
there is pride in the heart, the picture gallery is a 
stormy place ! 

He who is proud enough to attempt to deceive others 
in their opinion of him is sure to succeed only in 
deceiving himself. This is where it is so unfortunate. 
He tries to deceive others. He would have others 
think he is smarter than he really is. He would have 
others think he is richer than he really is. He would 
have others think he is more religious than he really 
is. He would do wrong to gain what to him seems 
good. And this too is wrong in principle. All the 
more one tries so to deceive others, all the more he 
knows that he is a fraud. And in keeping up this 
fraud from day to day, he comes to hate himself and 
to hate life. And he demonstrates what the Bible says, 
" Pride goeth before a fall." 

Why should the spirit of humility desire to make a 
show of self? Why should an honest man want to 
deceive anybody? Why should a true man want to 
have people be misled in their thoughts of him ? 

If one has any presence of mind at all,— I was going 
to say, if he have any sense at all,— he will be ashamed 
of the thought of pride. Suppose a woman wears a silk 
dress. If she knows anything at all about silk, she 
knows it is woven by little worms who are killed when 
the cocoon is finished. If she cares to figure it out, 
she can know that it takes about seven thousand silk 
worms to weave a pound of common silk. She can 
know that her silk sari represents therefore the killing 
of thousands of innocent worms ! When you sit down 
to eat bread, you can easily recall that in plowing for 
grain, as well as in harvesting and in grinding and 
in baking it, very many insect lives are taken. You 
can easily recall the large number of people who have 
to work in order that you may have even one bite of 
bread to eat! Suppose you have a good education. 
How easy it is to recall the fact that other people 
worked out the truths you know, and more than you 
know, long before you were born. And because of 
their hard labors in the deduction of the same it was 
made easy for you ! Suppose we think of our religion. 
We cannot but remember that it came at the price of 
death, the death of 'our Lord Jesus ! And how many 
since then have died for the same truth, until the 
acceptance of the same comes easy to us ! O brother, 
if a man have any serious thought at all, he will not 
be proud, however exalted a station he may occupy. 
Pride is the sure sign of empty-headedness. The 
full head of wheat bends over. Pride is the evidence 
that a man has no deep Christian experience. When 
the heart is full of goodness, thoughts are not centered 
upon appearances. Pride is an evidence that a man 
does not love his neighbor, How can he love him 
when every action of life is that he may seem to be 



bigger than his neighbor? Pride is the evidence that 
the individual does not know his God. A man of God 
rejoices because of his God, not because of himself. 
The fact that all one's inner thoughts are known and 
open to God ought to be enough to remove all signs 
of pride. The thought of the constant, abiding pres- 
ence of God is only continuous with those who know 
their Master. 

Worst of all, a proud heart is a disgrace to God. 
He is our Creator. He is our Father. We say we 
are like him. We say we bear his image. And we 
rejoice exceedingly because of it, but as we bear his 
image upon our hearts, as we show his divine nature 
in our lives, we become filled with love, with kindness 
and with the Holy Spirit. Where these are, there is 
no pride. Where these are, there is no deception, 
neither desire of it. O, just an evil thought flitting 
across your mind is a disgrace to God ! And yet men 
be proud? If they know God, they cannot be. 

Brethren, in this land of ours, if the Gospel in our 
hearts does not make us humble followers of the truth, 
humble servants of one another, humble children of the 
Father, what shall the hope of the heathen be? If 
the light in us be darkness, what shall they do who 
have not the light? I sorrow for India, but most of 
all I sorrow when I see the manifestations of a proud 
heart in those who say they have found the Lord 
You cannot be separate from the world and continue 
to be like the world. You cannot exalt yourself and 
successfully exalt your Master. Be yourself. Be 
your humble self, and God will exalt you. 

Of these two evils, anger and pride, I do not know 
which is worse. I know both are enemies to the 
common good. I know both destroy the spiritual life. 
I know both bring to pass just the opposite of what 
is desired. I know the fullness of the Gospel is not 
at home in an angry spirit. I know it is also not at 
home in a proud heart. Brethren, flee the danger. 
May the Lord bless you according to his Word. 



A PICTURE OF TWO SOULS. 

BY A. (J. CKOSSWHITK. 

Mother. — "Guess who preached to-day?" 
Son. — " Tell me what preachers were there and I'll 
tell you with the next breath." 

M.—" Well, there was Bro. Jones, Bro. Smith, Bro. 

Williams, Bro. Johnson, Bro. " 

-'>■ — " Don't mention any more. I can name him 

it was that long-winded Jones again, to be sure. Why 
is it that he must come way over here. every nice 
Sunday and keep others from preaching that can 
entertain the people ? " 

<)/.—" Be careful, son ; you may be wrong, both in 
your guessing and in your criticism. Bro. Jones did 
not preach. He did pray, however, and almost broke 
down when he touchingly referred to the sons and 
daughters of our pious fathers and mothers who were 
missed in the service to-day. He prayed the Lord to 
look at the tears that were bottled up in heaven and 
remember that they were shed in behalf of those 
wandering boys and girls. Papa and I both cried 
when we thought of you, dear child, and others thought 
he meant their children and wept with us." 

■S. — " Maybe he wanted to preach so bad that he 
cried about that and turned it off that way. Let it 
be as it may, you must have had a long exhortation 
for you are so late that we are almost starved waiting 
dinner." 

M.— " I am only too glad to tell you that Bro. 
M., of O., preached to-day and at the close of the 
sermon five young men arose and came forward and 
were instructed for baptism.. When we saw them 
come walking down the aisle with such happy faces 
we all cried again. We cried for joy and we cried for 
sorrow ; and then a lump came in my throat so big, 
John, that I couldn't get it up nor down. 

" As one after another of those gallant young 
soldiers of Jesus passed me I thought of you. The 
tears came so fast and they were so hot they almost 
burned my cheeks. The thought struck me that maybe 
my boy has changed his mind and come to church 
to-day, and will follow them. Oh, if it had been so 
I believe I should have shouted." 
With the narration of this great event it was evident 









THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 26, 1907. 



that the leaven was at work, and the mother's oppor- 
tunity had come at last, She could now dimly see 
the " bread that was cast upon the waters " returning. 
She measured not the velocity of the waves that would 
bring it to her again. Never had she known how long 
it took God to answer a mother's fervent prayer, but 
she rested in hope. She watched the expression of 
his countenance as she called over the names of his 
five associates and told him of the hour of baptism 
that same afternoon. 

John was not nearly so hungry as he had thought, 
scarcely tasting the well-prepared meal. The rest 
of the family were at the waterside in good time and 
so was John, but being behind the large crowd was 
not noticed until the last young man had walked out 
of the water and had his arms around his weeping, 
widowed mother. 

This sight brought the matter closer to John's heart 
and he was soon weeping penitential tears on the 
shoulder of his loving mother whose joy now knew no 
bounds. She stood oblivious to all around her and 
prayed the Father to take into his loving embrace one 
more prodigal son. 

" Mother," said he, " would they take me just as I 
am ? " ' 

" Yes, my darling, that's the way Jesus wants us 
to come." 

Only a few words were spoken. The angels came 
near while a few trembling lips sang one stanza of 
the beautiful hymn: 



"Just as I am, without one plea. 
But that thy blood was shed for mc; 
And that thou bid'st me come to thee, 
Oh. Lamb of God, I come, I come." 

and then John felt wdiat a good day that had been 
for him, and how quickly God's Spirit can operate 
on the poor sinner's heart. 
Flora, hid. 



CHRISTIAN GIVING. 
HY PETER BROWER. 

Just at this time the tithe system of giving to the 
Lord's cause is agitating the minds of many of our 
dear brethren and sisters. Many are laying much 
emphasis upon it, thinking that in it is the true 
principle of giving in this present, dispensation. 

It has the one grand advantage of being of God's 
own original appointment; but with all its merits and 
benefits it is much misunderstood by many of our 
people. The tithe system belongs to law rather than 
grace, and we are not under the law but under 
grace. It fails to meet the higher and nobler law 
of Christian giving. The law was rigid and exacting, 
and in its nature was formal, and did not educate 
God's people and bring them up to the high standard 
whjch God designed that the new should. Jesus came 
to establish a more perfect, a better and more spiritual 
form of worship for his people? John 4:23. 

The tithe under the former dispensation seems to 
have satisfied God's demands and man's needs, but by 
carefully studying the whole Jewish economy we will 
find that the tithe represented the minimum instead 
of the maximum, and under certain conditions and in 
certain years the actual proportion given to the Lord' 1 , 
cause, by the faithful Jew, often reached two-fifths, 
and sometimes as much as three-fifths of his actual 
income. The dispensation of grace teaches a higher 
ownership of ourselves, and everything that we 
possess, by God — " we are not our own, but are bought 
with a price " — and everything that we possess belongs 
to God, and we are only stewards, and are held 
accountable to God, the Giver of all good, for the 
way in which we use the goods entrusted into our 
care, and every redeemed, regenerated, and Spirit- 
filled life should recognize this higher ownership, and 
all we have, and all we do should be for the glorifying 
of God's name and for the upbuilding of his kingdom. 

Under the law, their Sabbaths, their worship, as 
well as their offerings, were at stated <times, the time 
and amounts fixed and compulsory. Now every day 
becomes sabbatic ; worship is acceptable anywhere and 
at any time, and is to be in " spirit and in truth.'" 
Our giving is to be " as the Lord has prospered us, 
as a man purposeth in his heart, not grudgingly " but 



cheerfully. It now appeals to our heart, to our higher 
nature. Paul says, " Though I give all my goods to 
feed the poor, and though I give my body to be 
burned, and have not charity, it profiteth me nothing." 
1 Cor. 13:3. We must give from the promptings of 
love. We serve God through love. God himself is 
love. This prompted the poor widow's " two mites," 
whom Christ commended, thereby indirectly condemn- 
ing the rich Pharisees who no doubt cast their tithes 
in the treasury of the Lord. Moreover, the tithe may 
be a fair proportion for the poor saint; it is manifestly 
out of all proportion for the rich, for all our giving 
should be of equality, and not so much by what is 
given as by what is kept, and those who are favored 
of God and are blessed abundantly should not feel 
satisfied by only giving the tenth to the Lord's cause. 
We now have something better, grander, that will 
bring us nearer to God, and God nearer to us than 
they did formerly, and God will require more of us 
than he did of the Jews. 

There should be in every congregation a thorough 
course of teaching in the fundamental principles of 
Christian stewardship. Men and women do not fully 
realize that they are God's, and everything belongs to 
him, and we are only his stewards. We have no right 
to do what we please with money, it is God's ! " The 
silver is mine, the gold is mine, saith the Lord of 
hosts." Hag. 2 : 8. This responsibility of stewardship 
includes all money-getting, money-using, and money- 
giving. This is the basis of all right giving. This is 
the soil in which all systematic giving must be planted. 
We must deal with the whole subject from this stand- 
point or we shall never see God's children abounding 
in this noble, elevating, soul-winning grace as they 
should. 

The successful business man is systematic in his busi- 
ness; so is the Christian in his giving, and the apostolic 
plan is perfect within itself, " to lay by in store " 
weekly or at stated times, as the Lord has prospered 
us; not a fixed sum or proportion, but according to 
the ability of the giver at the time. This has many 
advantages, and will have a tendency to cause us care- 
fully and prayerfully to weigh our responsibility, our 
obligations with increasing prosperity, as well as the 
many grand and noble opportunities which are con- 
tinually presenting themselves unto us for doing good 
in the Master's cause. 

But the difficulty lies in our conscience being too 
flexible relative to our real ability, and the demands 
upon us. But I feel that our Brotherhood has made 
rapid progress and growth in the last ten years, and 
I feel that much more rapid strides will be made in the 
next ten along this grand principle of Christian giving. 

I have no objections for our poor members using 
the tithe system for a basis for their giving, but those 
who arc wealthy should use the more heroic way of 
giving. — keep enough for their support and give all 
the remainder to the Lord. 

By adopting the tithe system in our Brotherhood. 
I fear many who are now giving more, and others who 
could be educated and induced to give more, would 
become satisfied with that amount without considering 
their obligations and duty to God and his sufTerinp. 
cause. 

South English, Iozva, 

THE SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS' INSTITUTE 
AS A FACTOR IN MISSION WORK. 

As we study the life of the greatest missionary — Jesus 
Christ — we find he spent thirty years in preparation be- 
fore he entered upon his public ministry, and after his 
great work began we find him improving every oppor- 
tunity to instruct others in spiritual things; especially were 
the apostles trained in the work of "fishing" for men. 

Again, as we study the life of Paul, wc find he also made 
great preparation for his work of saving souls, even re- 
tiring into Arabia in order to gain spiritual help for life's 
battles against the destroyer of souls. Paul, in giving 
instructions to Timothy, a young worker, says, "-Study to 
show thyself approved unto God, a worker that needeth 
not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth." 
Thus Paul emphasizes the need of preparation if we would 
please God. 

The last command of Jesus is an especially impressive 
one, "Go ye therefore and teach all nations." Do we 
need preparation to carry on this work? 

A teacher in our public schools is expected to attend the 
teachers' institute in order to be better equipped for the 



work. Christ has truly said, " For (he children of this 
world are in their generation wiser than the children of 
light." Is the spiritual teacher doing a work of less im- 
portance than the intellectual teacher? Surely the mis- 
sion worker who is called to face many perplexing prob- 
lems, needs a season of instruction and inspiration better 
I" equip him for the great work, soul saving. As the apos- 
tles needed instruction from the great Teacher, so wc 
too need this instruction, and we arc made to listen with 
admiration and wonder as the instructor portrays the 
workings of that Master Teacher. 

Then again, as one attends the institutes, he is brought 
into fellowship with the most active of the aged soldiers 
of the cross, whose lives have been spent for others. This 
is certainly an inspiration for mission work. A desire 
fills the heart to be of use in the Master's vineyard. 

Has the recent institute of Northwestern Ohio been a 
benefit to the Bellefontainc mission? Let me quote the 
words of one of our earnest young workers who was present, 
"In the future I will ask but for one thing for Christmas 
that is the privilege of attending the annual Sunday-school 
teachers' institute." The workers from this place all feel 
that they have been greatly benefited by this rich spiritual 
feast, and no one can measure the amount nf good to he 
accomplished in the future because of this season of in- 
struction and inspiration. 

Bro. Royer is not a novice in Sunday-school work, 
his long life of activity for the Master, coupled with his 
broad experience in training workers, makes him an in- 
struclor to be trusted and appreciated. 

Mission work must prosper because it is of God, and 
every one interested in the work, either directly or in- 
directly, should hail with delight the annual institute, 
which is doing so much to mould missionary sentiment, 
as well as to further the actual work of the district. 

Mary I.. Cook. 

Bellefontainc, Ohio. 



CANTON BIBLE INSTITUTE, OHIO. 

The third Annual Bible term was held from Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 14, 1907; J. G. and G. B. Royer instructors. The work 
was highly spiritual and edifying. All that were present 
felt like Peter when he said, " It is good for us to be here." 
The institute favored Northeastern Ohio by having special 
days for special work: (1) Sunday-school day; (2) mis- 
sionary day; (3) ministerial day. This, in connection with 
the Bible term,' was so edifying that on motion it was 
unanimously decided that similar arrangements he made 
for the Bible term of 1908. 

On ministerial day the topic, "How can the ministers 
in. each local church do more efficient church work?" 
was discussed with holy zeal. " Endeavoring to keep the 
unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace " was one leading 
thought. Psalm 133 places a high value oir this truth. 
Eph. 4: 1-3 was the burden of more hearts than one. Such 
was the yearning of Christ's soul when he offered the 
prayer of John 17. Good results will follow such meet- 
ings. Noah Louganeckcr 

Hartvillc, Ohio, Jan. 17. 

NOTES NOT CLASSIFIED 



Cottonwood church has been enjoying a scries of meet- 
ings held in Dtuilap at the Congregational church by Bro, 
Chas. Miller. Bro. Miller preached fifteen sermons in 
town and one at a schoolhouse in the country. There win 
good interest.— I'". N. Sargent, Dunlap. Kails., Jan. 20. 

Pine Creek church met in council at the Blissville house 
Jan. 12. One letter of membership was received. Wc or- 
ganized Sunday school to he held at the Blissville house. 
Superintendent, Sister May Pippeuger; secretary. Pearl 
Pontius.— D. B. Steele, R. D. 3, North Liberty, lnd„ Jan. 
21. 

Ridgely. — Our series of meetings, conducted by Bro. C. 
D, Hylton, closed Dec. 16. Bro. flylton delivered fifteen 
able sermons. Four were baptized. Our love feast was 
Dec. 16, Bro. My I ton officiating. Our council was Dec. 
12. Sunday-school officers for the next six months were 
elected and the Christian Workers' meeting was con- 
tinued at Ridgely for the next six months. — D. S. Stayer, 
Ridgely. Md., Jan. 15. 

Lancaster. — The church met in council Jan. 9. In the 
absence of our elder, our preacher in charge, Bro. J. W. 
Myer. presided. One person was received by letter. The 
term of the officers of Christian Workers' meeting was in- 
creased from three to six months. Program and lookout 
committees were appointed as a feature of progress to 
the Christian Workers' meeting. Nathan Killhefner was 
elected Bible elas3 leader for six months. Steps were tak- 
en to open a place for regular services at Eden, about two 
miles from the city. Arrangements were made to get Bro. 
Wampler to open a singing class here. A special council 
was held Jan. 11. Our elder, I. W. Taylor, presided. 
Elders S. R. Zug, H. E. Light and Hershey Groff were 
also present. H. B. Yoder was advanced to the second 
degree in the ministry and George W. Bcelman was elect- 
ed to the ministry. Nathan Killhefner and Franklin Byer 
were elected deacons. Our series of meetings is now in 
progress. Bro. I evi S. Mohler is the evangelist. — Emma 
C. E. Landes, 219 College Ave., Lancaster, Pa., Jan. 19. 

Elizabethton. — I am the only member of the Brethren 
church living in this city. The people 3re kindly disposed 
toward the Brethren, and wc should have a church here. 
Brother and Sister N. N. Garst came here last week to 
visit relatives. By request Bro. Garst preached at the 
Disciple church Sunday at 11. He delivered an able dis- 
course, which was well received by the people. Brethren, 
here is an opening. Come and do good. — J. O. Thompson. 
Elizabethton, Tcnn.. Jan. 7. 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 26, 1907. 



THE ROUND TABLE 



A CHRISTIAN. 
RV C. H. BALSUAUGH. 

The incarnation has a twofold purpose. The God- 
man is our exemplar, and also the transfiguring power 
that changes us into the same image from glory to 
glory. 1 Peter 2 : 21 ; 1 John 2:6; 2 Cor. 3:18. The 
immediate agency of transformation is the Holy Ghost ; 
but he gets all his supplies from Jesus, in whom 
dwelleth all the fullness of the Godhead bodily. John 
16:14. 15; Col. 2:9. The sairie Holy Ghost that 
made Christ, makes the Christian. 

God made man in his own image. The deyil 
marred and disfigured him. Jesus became incarnate 
to restore man to his primeval purity and beauty, and 
to elevate him to the consummation of God's eternal 
purpose. Eph. 3:9, 10, 11. How radical! how 
awful ! how hopeless was the fall of man ! Nothing 
could restore him but God manifest in the flesh, 
suffering, bleeding, dying, to atone for sin, and 
eradicate its imminence. Oh. how absolute and 
unreserved should be our consecration to such a 
Redeemer. " To me to live is Christ." Philpp. 1 : 21. 
This is not only the motto, but the unceasing aspiration 
and endeavor of the Christian. 

Does not the church need a revival ? Is not 2 Cor. 
4: 18 too much reversed? What is a Christian? One 
whose body, soul, and spirit is dominated by the in- 
dwelling Christ: whose life shines with the lustre of 
the beauty of holiness. John 14:20: Matt. 5:16. 
Do we know what this wonderful monosyllable means 
— G-O-D? How did we find it out? "He that hath 
seen me hath seen the Father." John 14:9. To see 
a Christian is to behold a living photograph of Christ. 
As is our conception and apprehension of Christ, so 
will be our character and our life. Holiness cannot 
tolerate sin in any form— in thought, emotion, word, 
act. 

Union Deposit, Pa. 



may be fitted for more and better work for him in the 
Sunday school. Jesus was present in power at the 
meeting which Thomas missed. In our meeting his 
Spirit was so preceptibly manifest that all were made 
to feel that it was good to be there. 

I missed seeing the growth of these meetings both 
in attendance and interest. 

I missed the inspiration which caused' others to 
inquire, How can I carry these lessons home to my 
church ? 

I missed the instruction of a teacher that has had 

more than fifty years' experience in training the young. 

I missed the privilege of celebrating the anniversary 

of the birth of my Savior in a way I would not he 

ashamed of were this my last. 

To illustrate: In our Bible school of one week. 
twenty attended on Monday, while on Saturday in- 
stead of not having time to attend meeting, as some 
had thought, we had almost a full house. They 
realized what they had missed. Do I? The meeting 
is over. The opportunity is gone forever. The Lord 
willing, there will be another meeting next year. Will 
I be there? 
Lima, Ohio. 



of our God. Yes, he'll write you about it, invite you 
to his home, keep you all night, go through heat or 
cold, rain or snow, mud or dust, over hills or plains, 
rocks or briars, lose his time, wear out his buggy, 
lame his horse, and endure any sort of privation, and 
run any sort of risk, that he may show you, and help 
you to own a home in heaven. 

If that is what is meant by a " real estate preacher," 
I'm glad to be his brother. Yes, and there will be no 
lawsuits about the commission, but it will be said to 
him: "Well done, thou good and faithful servant; 
thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will make 
thee ruler over many things ; enter thou into the joy 
of the Lord." 
Newport News, Va. 



WHAT IS IT WORTH? 

BY U. T. FORNEY. 

Blessed and holy is lie that hath pan in the first resur- 



LIVING UP TO OUR PROFESSION. 

BY ANDREW A. PETRY. 

Living up to our calling is seemingly a great task; 
but, stop! How are we trying to do it? Have we 
got the world and its endless cares on one shoulder, 
and a weak, sleepy effort for Christ on the other? 
If this is the case, what else can be expected but a 
very hard task indeed? For are we not told that we 
cannot serve two masters? 

How do we come short of doing our duty? From 
whence do all the vulgar, unchaste and nasty con- 
versations, jokes and tales come? Do we know' 
Certainly we do. From whose lips do they escape? 
May I say, Sometimes from Brethren of the German 
Baptist church? Alas! too truly, yes. 

What is it that leads some people into the saloons 
and many other places? Who is leading us? Should 
we not be very careful lest we fall into the way of 
sinners, and be led by the devil? 

Now, how can we live up to our profession? A 
few simple ways are: Enter no place that we would 
not welcome Jesus in our presence. Do nothing thai 
we would not want to be doing when lesus comes. 
Say nothing that we would be ashamed to say in the 
presence of Jesus. 

Read and study the Word of God and then be doers 
of the Gospel and not readers only. 

In conclusion, I think a good question for every 
Christian professor is: 

Am I living up to my profession or calling as God 
really intended that I should ? 

May God help us in our every duty. Amen. 

Hollansburg, Ohio. 



--■» ....... ^u,, ,,, Luc , ilot ICSUI- 

rection; on such the second death hath no power, but 
they shall be priests ol God and Christ, and shall reign 
with him a thousand years. — Rev. 20: 6. 

The Lord said in olden times, " Come and let us 
reason together." And that is a good precept in this 
age. I have been wondering what it takes in this 
age of the world to make us priests of God. Please 
turn to Gal. 3 : 24. If the law then was our " school- 
master to bring us to Christ," let us turn to Exodu; 
28, and read the; whole chapter ; then stop and meditate 
on the same. 

Do you think that the children of Israel knew the 
priests by their conduct only? Oh no, you would all 
say they knew them by their apparel, and their actions 
as they administered before the Lord. Nadab and 
Abihu had the apparel, but 'that did not make them 
faithful priests of God. Neither will apparel make 
us priests of God in the present time. But there is 
one thing certain, it will unfit some for being kings 
and priests. 

We find but one rule in the old law for priests. Why- 
is it, then, that we want so many different ones at this 
day and generation? I am sure 'that if we would read 
the precious promises recorded in the blessed Master's 
will, and want to claim them as ours, we would comply 
with the conditions. 
Egeland, N. Dak. 



A SUGGESTION. 

BY J. E. YOUNG. 

Nineteen hundred and eight ought to be a great 
year for activity in the Brethren church. Let a 
memorial meeting be held in Chicago or some other 
large city, beginning with the day of crucifixion and 
continue till Pentecost, the last week beginning the 
great work of the Conference week. How prepare 
for the occasion : Let each congregation hold a week's 
meeting, or longer, this. year, developing such subjects 
as the following: The Jubilee Year, What Was it to 
the Jews? The Brethren Church; Its Origin; Have 
we Drifted? What it Has Been for Christ and Hu- 
manity; What We Can Be in the Next One Hundred 
Years, if We Use Our Forces and Opportunities. 

Beatrice, Nebr. 



TO THE HOUSE OF GOD. 
An aged sister, in earlier years, walked eight miles 
to church. On the way she crossed many hills and 
passed through many valleys. These long walks to 
the house of God and the blessings she received were 
a great preparation for the longer walk of life, with 
its many hills which she calls difficulties and its valleys 
which she calls sorrows, but it is with joy that she 
looks to the Father's house at the end of life's journey. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TOPIC 



For Sunday Evening-, Februa 



' 3. 1907. 



LIKE CHRIST. 
For Sunday, February 3. 

Read I John 3: 2. 
Beholding Jesus! Wonderful! 
We are won to love Jesus because 

Seeing his grace and beauty, 
JA^are attracted to him as one "altogether lovely." 
Loving Jesus we seek 

To imitate him. John 13: IS. 

To become like him. 

To put him on. Gal. 3: 27. 

To be transformed into the same image. 2 Cor. 3: 18. 
Result. 

Our lives changed. 

Sweet, quiet disposition instead of bitter ones. 

Self-sacrifice instead of self-indulgence. 

Courage instead of failure. 



PRAYER MEETING 



For Week Beginning February 3, 1907. 

THE CHRISTIAN RACE.— 1 Cor. 9: 24. 
I. Three Classes. 

Those who refuse to run. Paul calls the™ 



II. 



WHAT I MISSED. 
BY DAVID BYERLY. 

That is. if I missed the Sunday-school Teachers- 
Institute of Northwestern Ohio. Thomas missed a 
meeting, and the result of that absence came near being 
fatal. It took extraordinary evidence to convince him 
We have no promise of the extraordinary, therefore 
the necessity of making use of every opportunity to 
acquaint ourselves with the great Teacher, that we 



A "REAL ESTATE PREACHER." 
BY WM. K. CONNER. 

I once heard one of our preachers referred to as 
a " real .estate preacher." It means that the man' is 
both a real estate agent and a minister. And it may 
mean that the preacher was more interested in talking 
real estate than in talking salvation. But suppose now 
that the speaker meant the real estate of heaven and 
not of earth. My, does not that change the picture? 
A different-looking man now, but just as wide-awake 
and earnest, with beaming face! Eloquently, logically 
and convincingly recommending a home in the city 



~ " '* "-■ ,,,,,. a iui ^ans mem "ene- 

:s of the cross of Christ." Philpp. 3- 18 19- 
Heb. 2: 3. 

2. Those who run, but fail to hold out faithful. Gal 
5: 7. Many start out under the most glowing 
prospects, but soon the hindrances incident to this 
life are permitted to obstruct their pathway ami 
they fail to gain Jhe prize. 

3. Those who run to win. 2 Tim. 4: 7, 8. " I have 
finished my course." says Paul, the faithful He 
had toiled and suffered, but it was to a purpose 

A crown of righteousness" was his glorious re- 
ward. 

Conditions of Entering the Race. 

1. We must be citizens of the kingdom. Eph 2- 19 
We must show that we have renounced the "hid- 
den works of darkness " and that we are loyal to 
the Great Commander. 

2. Blameless. Rom. 8: 1. •• Without spot and blame- 
less says Paul (2 Peter 3: 14V and this means 
much. It is a life work. 

3. A consecration of all we have and are. Rom. 12- 
1. A living sacrifice, every day of our life. 

4. We must be accepted. 2 Tim. 2: 19. "The Lord 
knoweth them that are his," and will graciously 
afford his help. J 

III. Conditions of Running. 

1. We must start right. John 10: 9. Christ's rules 
lor the race must be complied with. 

2. All weights etc., must be laid aside. Heb 12- 

j ,,T business is to run, and to run aright' 
and all that hinders must be put away. 

IV. Causes of Failure. 

'■ ? U m in| ?., as!de or backsliding. Psa. 78: 9; Acts 
/: 39. No progress by this method. 

2. Carelessness lohn 11: 10'. We must run our race 
patiently and carefully. 

3 ' m„ ,, rU1 V nt rt eSt r; 2 Tim - 4: 10 " Tl "= rc "re too 
many who. like Demas, are turning from the wav 
of righteousness to the beggarly elements of this 



rcasvrci 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 26, 1907. 



H OME AND JAMILY 

THE COMFORTER. 

BY' WALTER SWIHART. 
God gives to each the Holy Ghost 

Who makes with Christ companionship. 
How dies each ill propensity 

When love is spoken from each lip! 

Then all is one: what's mine is thine; 

On self no more doth flesh depend. 
Yes, youth and age grown cold with life 

Lean on this true and trusty friend. 

He cooleth much the heated sense; 

Soothes cares and pain; dispels each fear; 
Drops fragrance when the fainting, heart 

Falls down beside the silent bier. 

Awake! make room! This Friend receive; 
Thy soul redeemed will be his home; 
The glory known in heaven's court 
At once unchanged to thee wiil come. 
Churubusco. Ind. - 



READY-TO-HALT. 

BY EL1ZAHETII D. RQSENBERGER. 

When Great-heart accompanied some pilgrims to 
the Celestial city, he found some strong young men 
in the party and some women and children. But as 
you follow this pilgrimage in " Pilgrim's Progress " 
you find one, Mr. Ready-to-Halt, in the company, who 
went on crutches. He traveled with the women and 
children, because he could -not go forward swiftly; 
but it seems to me he must have tried their patience 
with his slow, lingering ways. 

There are Ready-to-Halts on the pilgrimage in these 
days. You meet with them almost anywhere on life's 
journey. Weak, vacillating people who are almost 
ready to give up because they hardly know which 
direction to take; they are never quite sure, so thev 
stand helpless and bewildered until some Great-Heart 
looks them up and helps them along. 

Ready-to-Halt is a most exasperating companion. 
You do not expect very much of him, and he invariablv 
does even less than you expect. You must go more 
slowly in order that he may not drop out of the race 
altogether. Sometimes the home training determines 
whether a child shall be a Great-Heart who presses 
forward unafraid, or a Ready-to-Halt. When the 
parents decide everything for the dear child, they rob 
him of his right to choose, decide, or take the initiative. 
The mother who decides what playthings her children 
shall have, what they shall play, where they shall go, 
until they turn to her and depend upon her for every- 
thing, commits a grievous error and is surely respon- 
sible if her children grow up into Ready-to-Halts. 
The wise mother well knows that whenever a child 
decides for himself, deliberately and without bias from 
others, any question however small, he has had just 
so many minutes of mental gymnastics — just so much 
strengthening of the will. And upon the strength 
and firmness of his will depends his success in life, 
more than upon any other thing. For the want of 
a strong will souls have been lost, because they weaklv 
looked back and then halted after they had put their 
hand to the plow. 

Said a mother, " Which will you have, Dorothy, 
a doll or a stove? You can have but one this time." 
And the little tot, weighing the merits of the two 
toys respectively, made her choice. " You can have 
a lunch down in the meadow, or spend the afternoon 
at your Uncle John's house, which shall it be?" In 
deciding such matters, trivial though they be, your 
children are forming the habit of decision. Let them 
learn that they must be content with the outcome. If 
their decisions are unwise, the disappointment will 
help them to make a better choice next time. One 
boy of twelve was very happy because his Uncle 
Frank had given him five dollars for a birthday 
present, and he talked to his mother about spending it. 
He was full of the idea of a lot of little things he 
i wished to purchase. His mother listened, and then 
said, " If I were you I would spend the money care- 
fully, get something worth while. You know you 
will want new skates, and perhaps a sled next winter, 
and some books. I would keep the money for those 
things. That is my judgment. But you must decide 
for yourself," 



" But, mother, I must have a football right now,'' 
he said several days later. And soon there was some- 
thing else he wanted, and so the money was spent in 
a short time for trifles that had their day and ceased 
to be. When winter came he said to his mother one 
day, very wistfully. " They have some dandy skates 
at the store for two dollars a pair." His mother asked 
all about the skates, but went no further. 

" I wish I had that money I spent on other things 
last summer," he went on soberly. " It would be nice," 
answered his mother, hardly able to keep from saying 
mare. The boy sat still, gazing out of the window. 
After awhile he said, " You knew better than I did 
about that money; I see it now." That mother never 
did a harder thing than let the boy go through the 
winter without new skates or sled. But the lesson 
was worth all they both suffered. The 'boy always 
remembered it, and it checked many an evil impulse 
for him in after years. 

Parents decide what their sons shall do. " I want 
Henry to be a farmer," says one; "James shall be 
a mechanic," says another. But they should not for- 
get that half the ills of the world come from people 
being out of place, trying to do that for which they 
were not intended. Our happiness and success in life 
depend upon our discovering our -bent as early as 
possible and getting into our right place. We have 
known of sad cases where loving and obedient sons, 
who did not wish to pain their father, have taken up 
a business to please him, for which they were totally 
unfitted. What wonder that as they grow older thev 
went slowly and uncertainly, and like Mr. Ready-to- 
Halt had to be assisted by those more capable than 
themselves. 

Bunyan says that " Ready-to-Halt was true-hearted " 
and honest. But when the pilgrims attacked Doubting 
Castle and Giant Despair, Ready-to-Halt could only 
remain in the road to watch while the stronger men 
attacked Giant Despair and slew him. So he did 
all he could and we honor him for his faithfulness, 
but, oh, how much better to be able to take .a strong 
man's place in the fray. 

" I want my children to grow up into strong, able 
men and women," said a mother recently, " so I am 
teaching them to depend upon themselves." " How do 
you do it?" I asked. "By never doing anything for 
them that they can do for themselves," she answered. 
"But," she added wistfully, "it is so hard to keep 
from doing things for them; yet I am sure that the 
plan is a good one." There is a thrill of exultation 
in the thought — the mighty power of the human will. 
How it has conquered and can conquer within an 
almost limitless range. 

When we have said all that there is to be said about 
heredity, environment, the force of circumstances, 
temptation, it still remains true that none of these 
shall make us what we will not be — man cannot, God 
will not. For evermore we must choose. It is an 
awful thing to make light of the choices which come 
to us. Day after day, the only safe way, the only 
true way, is to meet them in the light of eternity. 
One by one the Great-Hearts meet the issues of life 
and determine them aright as God gives the light. 

Covington, Ohio. 

SISTERS' AID SOCIETIES 

Sisters' Aid Society of Turtle Mountain Church, N. Dak. 
Our first organization took place Feb. 1. 1906. since 
which time we have held twenty- five meetings, with an 
average attendance of seven. We received as fees, dona- 
tions, and for things sold, $37.17; paid out for material, 
$23.17, leaving a balance of $14 in the treasury. Four 
comforts and a lot of clothing were received to be made 
over. We make comforts, bonnets, prayer coverings, 
clothespin aprons, and also help the needy and mother- 
less children in our midst. We reorganized Dec. 27, 1906, 
for a term of six months, with Mary Hoffman president, 
Clara Stayer vice-president, May Sherman superintendent, 
and Ida Fisher secrctai*y and treasurer. We meet twice 
a month. — Mary Hoffman, Sec, Perth, N. Dak., Jan. 1. 

Sisters' Mission Circle, Meyersdale, Pa. 
Our work, which has been organized quite a number of 
years, is still growing in strength and usefulness. The year 
1906 has been the most successful one in our history. We 
have had in the treasury during this year $197.47. Out 
of this fund we have contributed to the Brooklyn meeting- 
house $50; also $15 to comply with a four-year pledge; 



$20 to the home mission; $10 to Annual Meeting collec- 
tion; $16 to the support of an India orphan, $37.65 to our 
home people who we felt were worthy of our help. Be- 
sides we have made donations of clothing, etc., by the 
help of adjoining congregations who do not have circles, 
to Brooklyn and Chicago missions. The workers are be- 
coming more united and more enthusiastic in taking up 
good work. One feature of our regular business meeting, 
which is sure to give power and united effort to our work, 
is the privilege of every sister to offer a short prayer. It 
creates a feeling of sympathy and love one for another. 
This week a sister donated a load of coal and the workers 
met in the basement of the church for the purpose of quilt- 
ing and knotting comforts. The result was that eleven 
were finished in a few days. The new officers are Sue 
Just president, Ida Boyd vice-president, Ida Fike secre- 
tary and treasurer.— Linda Griffith. Meyersdale. Pa.. Jan. 

Sisters' Mission Circle. Root River, Minn. 
Since January, 1906, we have held seventeen meetings. 

with an average attendance of eleven. Have lost one 
member by death. At the beginning of the year we had 
$5.40 in the treasury; received for work done, $5.70; do- 
nated during the year, $5 to the St. Joseph mission; $10 
to the Minneapolis mission; $10 to Sister Sadie Miller, 
India; $10 to our district mission, on quota; $6 and some 
clothing to the Kansas City mission; $.1 to the needy at 
home; $10 to the Chicago mission; $2.30 expenditure for 
the circle; making a total of $56.30 paid out. Received 
during the year, $72.26, leaving a balance in the treasury 
of $15.96. At our last ■meeting we elected new officers for 
the next six months; Sister Lizzie Broadwater president, 
Sister Sarah Drury vice-president.— Flla M, Ogg. Sec, and 
Trcas., Preston, Minn., Dec. 27. 

Sisters' Aid Society, Bellcfontaine, Ohio. 
The Aid Society of Logan congregation held its first 

meeting Jan. 4. 1907. at Bro. B. F, Snyder's, with an at- 
tendance of twelve. Devotional exercises were conducted 
by Sister Mary Cook. Scripture lesson. Dorcas' work. 
Acts 9: 36-43. We made eleven garments and sewed some 
carpet rags. Our collection was $3. We dceiJed to meet 
the first Thursday of each month, (lie next meeting to be 
held at Sister Lucy Hubcr's.— Luclla 7.. Swank, Bellcfon- 
taine, Ohio. Jan. 10. 

Sisters' Sewing Circle, Sterling, III. 
During the year 1906 we held fifty-five meetings, with 
an average attendance of six. We quilted thirteen quilts, 
knotted eight comforts, sewed one hundred and fifteen 
pounds of carpet rags, and made some clothing. We sant 
two barrels of clothing to Palestine, Ark,, and one barrel 
to the Chicago mission. At the beginning of (he year we 
had $3.58 in the treasury; received $28.58; total, $32.16. 
We =ent $5 to the Japan sufferers; $5 to the Bulsnr chvrch; 
$4 to the Rockford church; gave $4 to the church treas- 
ury: $11 to the parsonage fund; $2.79 was paid for expense 
of sending clothing, etc. Although few in number, we be- 
lieve the Lord blesses those that are faithful' to the end. 
Let us continue in the good work.— Katie Myers, Sec. and 
Trcas,, Sterling, Til., Jan. 7.' 

Scott Valley Aid Society, 

The sisters of the Scott Valley church. Kans., met July 
18 and organized an Aid Society, and elected officers for 
six months, during which time we have held ten meetings. 
Our collections have amounted -to $10.01, and we have re- 
ceived for caps sold $1.50. Our expenses have been $8.35. 
We sent $2 to the St. Joseph mission and have $2,13 in the 
treasury, Our membership is thirteen, and the average 
attendance nine. We sent a box of clothing and bed- 
rlothing. the worth beinir estimated at $22.50, to the Kan- 
sas City mission. Dec. 20 we elected officers, choosing for 
president Sister Mollie Smith and reelecting Mary Sherfv 
for secretary and treasurer. Our band is small in number, 
but wc pray that our numbers may be increased and that 
we may do mora and better work to help along suffering 
humanity and bring souls to Christ. — Mary Sherfy, Sec. 
and Trcas., Westphalia, Kans., Jan. 8. 

North Solomon Aid Society, Kansas. 
The sisters of the North Solomon church met and or- 
ganized a Sisters' Sewing Society, with Sister Mina Lerew 
president, Sister Masie Moyer vice-president, Ida Purvis 
secretary and Sister Sarah Lerew treasurer. We have a 
membership of fifteen willing workers, and meet every two 
weeks. We sent two hundred and five pounds of clothing 
to the Kansas City mission, and are now fixing up a box 
for the workers at Wichita. Wc pray the Lord to bless us 
that we all may be willing to do our share in the work. — 
Ida Purvis, Sec, Portis, Kans., Jan. 7. 

Sisters' Aid Society, Ottawa, Kansas. 

We have reorganized, with Sister Lou Eshelman presi- 
dent, Sister Jennie Kaut superintendent and Sister Emma 
Devilbiss secretary and treasurer. We have been meeting 
every two weeks during the coldest weather. Our average 
attendance has been nine, with a collection of sixty-three 
cents. We donated three large sacks of clothing and now 
comforts to the Kansas City mission; and our purpose is 
to do work, or make money donations, wherever we see 
they are needed. The society takes in a great deal of 
sewing, which makes it necessary to have a machine of 
our own and a regular place of meeting. Wc hope to ac- 
complish more work another year. Best wishes to all 
workers.— Luis G. Throne, Ottawa. Kans., Jan. 7. 






56 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 26, 1907. 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER 

A RELIGIOUS WEEKLY 

PUBLISHED BY 

Brethren Publishing House 

Publishing Agent 

The General Missionary and Tract Committee, 

22 and 24 south State Street, Elgin, III. 



SUBSCRIPTION. 



$1.50 PER ANNUM, IN ADVANCE 



p. L. MILLER, niinote. ) I J K Moonn <-ww~ ,r.,,._ 

*L c Eaju-v. \inrlnia. ) I R. E. Ara-old. Buauwsa Manajre. 

AdviBory Committee: 

Edward Frantz. Geo. S. Arnold, p. R Keltner. 



i_ ^T _? *" md communications Intended lor the paper Should 
be addressed to the BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE. ELGIN ILL 
tnd not to any individual connected with iL ^^ 



Entered at the post office at surtn, III., a a Seoond-clasa Matter. 

D. D. Thomas, of Ohio, changes his address from 
Harrod to Herring-. 



Bro. J. G. Royer is at this time engaged in a 
protracted meeting in South Bend, Ind. 

Bro. George S. Rairigh, of Denton, Md., is con- 
ducting a series of meetings in the Lower Cumberland 
church, Pa. 



Bro. L. H. Eby spent three weeks with the church 
at Roanoke, La., and reports some refreshing seasons. 
Seven were added to the church by confession and 
baptism, two restored to fellowship and two others 
may unite with the church soon. 

Bro. S. A. Honbercer remained in Virginia nearly 
one month longer than he had planned. While in the 
State he held several meetings, the last one being in 
the Trinity house, where seven came out on the Lord's 
side. He is now preaching at Cabool, Mo. 

The members at Lake Arthur, N. M., arranged 
to. have their first services in their new house last 
Sunday. The building, however, is by no means 
finished, but the committee has gone as far as the 
means in sight would permit, hoping to be able to 
complete the building in the near future. 

On Monday forenoon another group of Bethany 
students, all young brethren and sisters, called at the 
Messenger office. It is getting to be quite common 
for these students to make' pilgrimages to the Pub- 
lishing House on Monday. We are always glad to 
see them, for they seem to be a happy and earnest set 
of workers. 



Bro. F. Gochenour, of 2118 Bird St., Joplin, Mo 
says, he feels confident that there are many members 
in his State district, who will be glad to help the 
mission at Joplin, realizing that it is the only city 
mission in the district. He can make use of a number 
of issues of the Messenger for 1906, as well as those 
already published this year. Secondhand clothing for 
children is also in demand, and money, from those of 
his district, is always in order. Those desiring further 
information should address Bro. Gochenour as above. 

On account of the long distance to the place of 
Annual Meeting, next spring, it is proposed to change 
the time of the district meeting of Middle Pennsyl- 
vania from April V to March '20. There may be 
other districts that should hold their meetings earlier 
If so, immediate steps should be taken to arrange for 
the change. The officers of the last district meeting 
for any district, are the ones to act. It will also be 
necessary for the queries, intended for the open con- 
ference, to reach our desk fully eight days sooner than 
usual, so they can appear in the Annual Meeting 
program booklet. This booklet will have to be printed 
several days in advance of the usual time. 



Bro. C. E. Eller conducted revival services in the 
Peters Creek church, Va., and seven applied for 
membership. 



Sixteen accessions to the church are the fruits of 
twenty-six sermons recently preached by Bro. F. 
H. Crumpacker at Salem, Kans. 

Bro. E. B. Hofe filled the pulpit in the Elgin 
church, last Sunday evening. His discourse was 
listened to with a good deal of interest. 

Bro. Wm. Lampin, of Polo, 111., closed a fine 
meeting at Rossville, Ind. There were thirty-three 
baptized and two restored to fellowship. 

Bro. A. A. Sutter has been chosen to represent 
Texas and Southwestern Louisiana on the Standing 
Committee next May. One paper goes to the Annual 
Meeting. 

A revival meeting was held in the Mount Hope 
church. Washington, by the home ministers, and five 
applied for membership. The spirit of the meeting 
was good. & 



When last heard from there were ten accessions to 
the Union Center congregation, near Nappanee, Ind 
where Bro. Walter J. .Barnhart has been holding 
revival services. 



A series of meetings at the city church. North 
Manchester, Ind., resulted in sixteen confessing 
Christ and applying for membership. Twelve of. them 
have been baptized. 

The revival in the Pine Glen House, Spring Run 
congregation, Pa„ closed with twenty-four applicants 
for membership, sixteen baptized, five awaiting the 
rite and three reclaimed. 



Since the publishing of the Brethren Almanac for 
1907, containing the ministerial list, Bro. Francis F 
Durr, of Masontown, Pa., has changed his address to 
Smithfield, R. D. 9, same State. 



Mt. Morris College closed her special Bible term 
last week. The attendance is reported to have been 
good and the instructions excellent. Those who 
availed themselves of the benefits offered by the entire 
course will be better prepared for work in the future 
than in the past. This can well be said of the work 
• lone at all the Bible terms in the Brotherhood. 

A short time ago we found it necessary to return 
an article to one of our best contributors for recasting. 
After a few weeks the article, much improved, came 
back, accompanied by the following note: " You were 
right in rejecting my article, as I see, since reading 
your explanation, though it had not occurred to me 
before. I have now cut out everything objectionable. 
If not, make it right." Editors, who do their utmosl 
to keep their paper on a high, Christian and consistent 
plane, appreciate a spirit of this sort. 

Bro. M. Flory's time, as superintendent of The 
Home of Southern Illinois, at Girard, expires March 
1. On the same date he closes his work at Spring- 
field, the district mission board expecting to have a 
minister located and in charge by that time. He will 
then enter the evangelistic field and is now ready to 
make engagements for spring, summer and fall meet- 
ings. Bro. Flory has done a good work in the past 
and we are sure that his efforts in the future will be 
appreciated. He may be addressed at Girard, 111. 

Prof. J. W. Jenks, of Cornell University, writing 
Bro. D. L. Miller, has this to say about " The Other 
Half of the Globe," which we are now offering as 
a Messenger premium: " I was very much pleased to 
receive the other day a copy of your book, and spent 
a good part of one night with it. Georgia (Mrs 
Jenks) read it also pretty thoroughly, and site said 
to tell you that whenever she wants to know anything 
on the subjects that really interest her in the countries 
where you have traveled, she goes to your books 
I here are books and books of travel, but you have 
the gift of seeing the kind of things that interest her 
and me." 



In the spring of 1906 we spent a few days at 
Mex, co> I„d„ and while there called on Sister Meldora 
Fisher, who has been an invalid for eight years The 
tune we called on her she seemed as cheerful as half 
ot the people who enjoy good health, though she had 
not been able to even sit up for nearly five years 
Under date of Jan. 11, she writes us saying, that the 
Lord is still sparing her life, and that her intense 
suffering has decreased sufficiently to permit her being 
wheeled about a little in an invalid chair. She adds 
that the Messenger is looked for with much interest 
from week to week, and that its contents are a ^reat 
comfort to her. Our invalid sister suffers much and 
craves an interest in the prayers of those of like 
precious faith. 



Gypsy Smith, of England, has been doing some 
plain preaching in Chicago. In one of his discourses 
a few evenings ago he said : " Y'ou also talk of the 
worldly things, such as cards and the theater, and 
justify your indulgences in them by saying that ' there 
is no harm in them.' If there was not you would 
not be called upon to defend them. You never have 
to say that it is not wrong to read the Bible, or to 
lead a good life, or to go to church. I have not 
been invited to a card party or a wine supper or the 
theater for a quarter of a century. O. yes, you say 
that it is because I am an out-and-out about those 
things. Well, if every real -Christian was a real out- 
and-out about these things he would not be insulted 
by being invited and expected to attend such amuse- 
ments." 



A revival, quite recently, at Spring Run. Pa 
closed with sixteen baptized, three reclaimed and two 
awaiting the initiator,' rite. The meeting is said to 
have benefited the whole community. Bro. J. T. 
Sheaffer did the preaching. 

Some days ago an agent of the American Express 
Company, at one of the railroad stations in Illinois 
resigned because his conscience would not permit him 
to deliver packages containing whiskey and tobacco 
A man with that kind of a conscience is to be com- 
mended. The world is in need of more men of this 
sort, men who have a good conscience and will not 
do the thing they believe to be wrong. 



Because France has decided to separate church and 
state, and treat all denominations about like they are 
treated in this free America, the Catholics of the 
United States and some other countries are going to 
boycott France, by refusing to make use of anything 
produced in that country. In this way they hope to 
bring France to terms. This may not be a very nice 
dung for a church to do, but there is one kind of 
boycotting we would like to have the Catholics in the 
United States undertake. We would like to see them 
boycott the saloons, and decide that no Catholic shall 
run a saloon,- or enter one for a drink. If they could 
be induced to do this, about one-half of the saloons 
would have to close down inside of shx weeks This 
is the kind of boycotting that both reason and Scrip- 
ture will sustain, and it would cause the angels in 
heaven to rejoice and shout for joy. 



Bro. A. W. Vaniman, secretary of the Committee 
of Arrangements for the Los Angeles Conference 
writes us that a number of sub-committees have been 
appointed to look after the various departments of the 
meeting. There is a committee on reception and 
another on lodging and restaurants. There is also a 
bureau of information, a baggage superintendent, one 
to look after the post office and another to superintend 
the ushering. A brother has been selected to keep in 
touch with newspapers, and a committee authorized to 
arrange for a Bible term, while another brother is to 
make all needed provisions for song service. Bro Geo 
Chemberlen, a member of the Committee of Arrange- 
ments, will manage the platform. There will be no 
occasion for a dining hall, as there are plenty 
of restaurants in the immediate vicinity of the 
Auditorium, where good meals, at reasonable prices 
may be had. The lodging accommodations will be 
excellent. Los Angeles is a city of hotels, lodging 
houses and private rooms for rent. Those attending 
the Conference will be able to secure any kind of 
accommodation they may desire, at rates in keeping 
with the value of the service furnished. Durin- the 
meeting one can live here as cheaply as in any other 
city, of the same size, in the United States. The man 
with plenty of money can find anything he cares to 
pay for, while the man of moderate means will be able 
to secure accommodations within reach of his purse 






BB3— gg^g ga j gE 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.- January 26, 1907. 



WANTED,— A CHURCH AND SCHOOL BUILD- 
ING AND HOSPITAL AND DISPENSARY 
HOME AT BULSAR. INDIA. 
Last June the General Missionary and Tract Com- 
mittee made a call in these columns for money for 
church and hospital and school buildings at Bulsar, 
India. The response was liberal. Churches and in- 
dividuals gave of their store, but there is still a lack 
of over a thousand dollars. At its last meeting the 
Committee said " call again." Hence this appeal. 

The brethren and sisters in India feel the need of a 
church and school building at Bulsar and have felt it 
fdr sdtne time. So strong was this feeling that they 
determined to make an effort to bear the expense Of 
building among themselves. They raised about One 
thousarid dollars, riot of their abundance, but out Of 
" ali their living." Some of the native' brethren" who 
work for a few cerits a day, having no money to give, 
are ready and willing to give of their strength iri labor. 
When this point had been reached; a dear sister in 
Philadelphia sent over five hundred doiiars, and three 
hundred more came from a liberal brother and sister 
at Covington, Ohio. This made it possible to think 
of building large enough for the needs of the church. 
There are many who will want to give to help the first 
church and hospital in India, and here is the op- 
portunity. 

Do the members in India need a church? At the 
last love feast we enjoyed with them, two hundred 
and thirty-seven of us were crowded into" a small room 
in which scarcely a hundred could have been accom- 
modated with our arrangement in this country. We 
all sat on the " limpoo " floor (a mixture of cow dung 
and clay used by the natives in India to cover the earth- 
en floor of their houses), and the Lord was with his 
humble followers. If you could have been there you 
would have said, Surely these poor people need a meet- 
inghouse and we will give of the superabundance with 
which the Lord has blessed us to help them. 

And there is also great need of a hospital, and a 
dispensary, and home for our growing and prosperous 
medical work in India. Our doctor, Brother Yereman, 
has from sixty to eighty patients thronging his limited 
quarters daily. These are so wholly inadequate that 
the brethren are renting the old government post office 
building as a makeshift. 

Our doctor has performed more than a hundred 
major and difficult surgical operations in India, and 
has been eminently successful in all of them. When it 
is considered that he has had no proper hospital facili- 
ties, the dispensary having limpoo floors, it is a great 
wonder that he has been as successful as he has. 

Last year a man brought his little ten-year-old girl 
to the dispensary. She was born blind, having con- 
genital cataract. The doctor removed the cataract 
and restored sight to the blind child. The father would 
have expressed his gratitude by kneeling down and 
kissing the doctor's feet if he had been permitted. The 
opportunities for reaching the people in this way are 
the very best. 

An extravagant sum is not asked for. In our large 
cities it would not be thought wise to begin hospital 
work with less than from fifty to a hundred thousand 
dollars. From four to six thousand will complete the 
church fund and build the hospital and dispensary, and 
build it well. 

The opportunity is before you. Give as God has 
prospered you ; give cheerfully and willingly, and let 
your prayers go with the gift : give now. for the need 
,S Ur ^ nt - D. L. Mills*, 

For the General Missionary Committee. 



57 



Last week it was our privilege to meet with the 
students and instructors of the Bethany Bible school 
188 Hastings St., Chicago. It was during the special 
Bible term and the number in attendance was most 
encouraging. In fact the school had to be moved into 
the church just across the street in order to accom- 
modate all present. It is largely made up of young 
ministers, missionaries and Sunday-school workers' 
About the school there is an atmosphere that is 
decidedly attractive, and the work done is not only 
a credit to those in charge but a credit to the Brother- 
hood. Unusual attention is given to the doctrine of 
the church, and the preparation of young brethren and 
sisters for the work of the ministry and the special 
requirements of the mission fields. 



A PROBLEM. 
All problems are foufided tfpofl a question which 
implies a thing, or things, not understood— informa- 
tion desired. This thing, or these things, placed into 
intelligent or practical forms, are called problems. 
And Of these we have many and of great Variety. 
Some are very simple because of their make-up. 
Others art more difficult of solution for the same 
reason. Because of the advantages some persons are 
supposed to have over others in obtaining information, 
they are supposed to be problem solvers. Teachers, 
ministers and editors are supposed to be among the 
favored ones; and because of this are often unduly 
flooded with all kinds of problems which they are 
supposed to solve for the benefit of those who do not 
know, or those who think they do know and want to 
flounder the fellow who may happen to give a different 
solution. 

Because of our position we have each year quite a 
large number of questions presented, expecting an 
answer, either privately or through the press. Oc- 
casionally we get one of sufficient interest to justify 
a public exposition. And here is one of them. 

" One brother dresses in modest, inexpensive 
material, but gives no attention to the cut of his 
garment. Another dresses in much finer and more 
expensive material but has his garments made strictly 
in the order. Now, which of the two carries out best 
the Bible or gospel principle? " 

Before trying to give a solution for this problem 
we must first determine what gospel plainness is and 
get the true definition of the terms, " modest apparel," 
and " costly array," as they apply to our subject. 
And perhaps this is the most difficult part of our 
problem. Without referring to dictionaries, and giving 
a common-sense interpretation. " modest apparel " 
would mean, first: Garments that properly and 
decently cover the person's body— such parts of the 
body as civilized and Christian people, by common 
consent, have decided should be covered in order that 
purity of mind and heart may be encouraged and 
established. Of course, in carrying out this idea, 
climatic conditions and long-established customs must 
be duly considered. 

Second: In making the garments, simplicity or 
plainness should be a consideration, within the bounds 
of propriety. No unnecessary appendages should be 
added that are merely for show or style. By this we 
do not mean that good taste and general comeliness 
should be ignored, as all things are to be done decently 
and in order. Misfits and slovenliness do not belong 
to the Christian graces. 

" Costly array." To determine just what " costly 
array " means in this connection, or in any other 
connection, is exceedingly hard, because all these 
things may have proportionate and conditional 
values. In this age of competition in business 
of all kinds, much of the manufactured wares 
is what is generally termed shoddy. It is made as 
cheap as possible and is made to sell rather than to 
wear. This, in the minds of most people, would not 
be classed as " costly array," and yet it is because, 
when you buy it, you don't get the worth of your 
money — there is no service or wear in it. 

Again, there are goods that cost five times as much 
per yard, and yet they cannot be classed as " costly 
array " because they give good service, good wear for 



the money paid. « Costly array," it seems to us is 
hue and fashionable goods for which we pay large 
prices, not because of the service and wear they give 
but because they make a fine appearance and are in 
the style. 

Now if. we would accept these definitions and be 
governed by them, would that, it may be asked be 
gospel plainness in our dressing? We think it would 
'" a gospel sense. Then why desire and ask for an 
order, or specified form in dress, to be used bv our 
members? The answer is: As a means to an end.' And 
the end de SI red is, that we may maintain gospel plain- 
ness. You may ask, Cannot gospel plainness be main- 
tained without the order or form? Yes, if we were 
all filled with the meek and humble spirit of the Christ, 
it could. But because too many of us, unfortunately' 
are not sufficiently filled with this spirit we fail to 
carry out this spirit, and gradually drift out into the 
vain fashions of the world. 

Hence, it seems evident that some kind of mean; 
should be employed to attain to the end desired. And 
the church has thought an " order " or specified form 
in dressing, different from the fashionable styles 
adopted and used by the world, best maintain gospel 
plainness. 

If this " order " could be accepted voluntary and on 
gospel principle, it seems to us. the end could be 
reached and maintained. Otherwise, the purpose and 
end is lost, and the principle is grossly violated. The 
form of the garment as specified by the " order " may 
he complied with to the letter, and the apostolic in- 
junction not to be dressed in "costly array" be 
entirely ignored. 

It seems to us that the purpose and end of the 
means is being defeated by many of our brethren and 
sisters trying to comply with the letter of the means 
to be used, and entirely overlooking the principle. The 
same is equally true of those who say that they can 
carry out the principle of gospel plainness independent 
of the form, and yet, in their practice, entirely run 
away from the principle. The sensible thing for those 
to do who claim that gospel plainness can be main- 
tained without some kind of a specified form, is to 
demonstrate it by their example and practice. 

While we believe that the principle of gospel plain- 
ness can be carried out by doing what the apostle 
directs, we confess to our disappointment upon the 
part of those who make this claim and urge it so 
strongly. If such brethren and sisters expect to gain 
approval and confidence they must he consistent and 
live out strictly what they claim and profess. What 
our church people need is more gospel teaching on 
this gospel principle. Preach the Word. It is the 
power of God unto salvation. n. it. u. 



PERSIA. 
Persia, five hundred miles to the east of Northern 
Palestine, is an old country, and at one time was the 
most powerful empire in the world, and could boast 
of a very advanced civilization. One reverse after 
another came, and for years the whole nation has been 
in a state of decadence. Recently, however, there 
seems to be a disposition to make some advances and 
adopt a few of the modern methods of government. 
The shah, who recently died, enlarged the liberties 
of his people, gave them a constitution and 
convened a parliament. Europeans are watching this 
movement with much interest, for up to this time they 
have not been welcomed and a residence in the country 
has been looked upon as dangerous, and it is hoped 
that the conditions may improve. 

But Persia stands in need of reform from a religious 
as well as from a civil standpoint. Education is 
neglected. There is no disposition to improve and 
develop the country. The religion is Mohammed- 
anish, which means the Koran and the sword. There 
are a few Armenians and some Nestorians, but as a 
rule Christianity is kept in check, and in many localities 
the Christians are persecuted. Men who violate the 
law, or do that which is not pleasing to the authorities, 
are punished by being flogged on the bottom of the 
feet. The feet are fastened to a pole and held up 
while others apply the tough rods until the man roars 
with pain. The punishment is often so severe as to 



$ 



5S 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 26, 1907. 



result in death. There is no limit fixed by law for the 
amount of flogging: one may receive. Men who rent 
their houses to Giristians are sometimes tortured in 
this manner. Occasionally men are put into pits in 
the ground up to their necks, and the pits then filled 
with liquid quicklime and gypsum, which eat the flesh 
like fire, causing intense agony. In this condition 
they are left to die. 

Persia has other ways of punishing, equally severe. 
There are few prisons, and these are dark and miser- 
able dungeons, where prisoners are kept often without 
food, save that given by friends. The heads of 
criminals are sometimes cut off, placed on poles and 
carried through the streets to intimidate those who 
might be disposed to oppose the government in any 
manner. 

Men whom the government fears to arrest openly 
are often invited to a banquet under the pretense of 
showing them special honor, and then they are secretly 
put to death, sometimes by poisoning and at other 
times they are shot. The government employs men to 
carry out her instructions in this particular. Among 
the mountains there was an outlaw with a strong 
following. The government made repeated attempts 
to capture him but failed. Then it was decided to 
play the friendship game. The outlaw was promised 
protection, honor and a good position in the govern- 
ment. Along wth several of his braves he was feasted 
and honored for a month, while government officials 
were planning with him for an honorable appointment 
and official favors. The evening before the papers 
were to be signed, he and his braves were waylaid and 
shot by men employed to commit the deed. This 
was done in the city where he was being feasted and 
honored. 

Surely a government of this kind needs Christianity 
as much as the heathen lands. There are a number 
of missions in Persia, but they are far from being 
enough. There ought to be hundreds of earnest 
workers, but how to establish more missions, on ac- 
count of the unfriendly attitude of the government. 
is the great problem. But we feel sure "that it will 
be accomplished. Christianity must and will capture 
Persia, though it may take more than a score of 
years to do it. 



respective mission boards, and the endorsement of the 
General Missionary Committee to make appeals 
through the Messenger, omit from their reports 
appeals for money. It will save us the trouble of 
marking out that part of reports, and possibly the 
embarrassment of being called to account for not 
adhering more strictly to the Conference ruling. 
This is not to apply to clothing and other supplies 
needed, but to money alone. If our readers fee! 
disposed to send contributions to any of these mission 
points, either in their own state district or out of it, 
that is their privilege. But the published appeals 
should be kept within the Conference limits. 



in church lines, and the conveniences of electric lines, 
it may become necessary to do considerable trans- 
ferring of membership for members, who live along 
the electric lines, or near the meetinghouses in other 
church districts. 



APPEALS FOR MONEY. 
The Brethren are opening missions in many of the 
cities in the United States. This is the proper thing 
to do. But a number of these missions are calling 
through the Messenger for help, and the number is 
increasing. The call for clothing and other supplies 
is all right, but how about the appeals for money! As 
bearing on this point, we call special attention to the 
following query and answer, which passed the last 
Annual Meeting: 

Inasmuch as there is an inclination to solicit the general 
Brotherhood for funds for building meetinghouses and 
other purposes, which is causing dissatisfaction in some 
Places, as well as interfering with the general mission 
work of the church, the General Missionary and Tract 
Committee requests this Annual Meeting to adopt the fol- 
lowing plan for securing help: 

Whenever help is desired by any congregation or mis- 
sion point ,t shall first solicit its own congregation: then 
by permission of the district mission board solicit the dis- 
trict ,n which the congregation is located. Then if further 
help ,s needed said congregation shall petition the General 
Missionary and Tract Committee, the petition first being 
endorsed by the district mission board. 
Answer. — Request granted. 

All general appeals made through the Messenger 
should first have the approval of the interested State 
district board, and then the sanction of the General 
Missionary Committee. We have been endeavoring 
to exclude the public calls for money, not properly 
endorsed, but on account of the skillful way in which 
some of these appeals are worked into the body of 
reports sent for publication, it becomes an exceedingly 
difficult thing to do, and yet, according to the decision 
of the last Conference, all of them should be denied 
admission in the Messenger. We have been granting 
unusual liberty along this line, and since it is not our 
desire to disrespect the action of the Conference but 
to treat all alike, we suggest that the mission points 
and other points, that do not have permission of their 



LOS ANGELES AND THE BRETHREN. 
The city of Los Angeles, where the Annual Meeting 
is to be held next May, is now believed to contain 
a population of about 230,000, or, including the 
tourists and transients of last May, 235,000. It is 
quite probable that the United States census of 1910 
will find a population reaching the neighborhood of 
400,000. The Brethren are fairly well represented in 
the city, having three places of worship with excellent 
prospects of extending their influence and increasing 
their number. The church should have a few men 
who can give their entire time and attention to the 
ministry, and under their direction the city and out- 
lying suburbs should be thoroughly worked. The 
coming Conference, held in the heart of the city, and 
in one of the best buildings on the Pacific coast, will 
likely prove helpful to the Brethren and their work, 
all over Los Angeles county. We already have a 
strong hold in the county, with every indication of 
rapid growth and development. Those from Eastern 
and Middle States, who visit California next summer, 
will not find a number of small, struggling congre- 
gations. Instead, they will find flourishing and wel!- 
officered congregations, with large, commodrms meet- 
inghouses, splendidly attended services and good 
Sunday schools. Some of the churches are quite large 
and not a few of the members possess considerable 
wealth. There are congregations where the services, 
as well as the attendance, will remind the visitor of 
some of the well-to-do churches in Pennsylvania and 
Virginia. In a sense most of them are transplanted 
churches, being made up largely of members who came 
from Eastern and Middle States, and what one sees 
elsewhere in the Brotherhood he may see here. A 
few of the congregations, possibly, have more 
preachers than they can use to advantage, but a 
modern Gideon may solve that problem for them one 
of these days. 



WITHOUT A CHURCH LETTER. 
If a minister, without a letter, settles in a locality, and 
helps to build up and organize a church, docs that in any 
manner constitute him a member of the congregation or 
cuttle him to the usual privileges of the congregation? 
Should he move away, could the congregation grant him 
a letter? 

The minister's membership is where he has left his 
letter, and that is the only congregation in which 
he is entitled to a vote. The new congregation cannot 
grant him a letter until he first establishes his member- 
ship by handing in a letter, and is duly received. He 
should have had his letter when he located, and then 
handed it in at the time the congregation was or- 
ganized. In the absence of a church letter, beyond a 
reasonable time, he ought not to be very active in 
church leadership. If it be impossible for him to 
secure a good letter from his home congregation, "he 
has no business helping to organize churches, or 
presiding in council meetings. As a rule, it is safe 
to not stake much on a preacher who locates in a con- 
gregation and does not pass in his letter at a reasonably 
early date. If he is a member in good standing he 
can easily get a good letter, and ought not to be 
yery long about it. If he cannot get a letter, there 
is something wrong, and if he is not prudent enough 
to remain reasonably quiet until he can make satis- 
faction with his home congregation, he should be in- 
structed accordingly. 



TRANSFERRING MEMBERSHIP. 
A brother lives several miles from the meetinghouse of 
the congregation in which he resides and holds his mem- 
bership. Only a few hundred yards from his home and 
just across the line, is a meetinghouse in another congre- 
gation. He prefers to hold his membership in the congre- 
gation having the meetinghouse near his home. Can he 
change his membership without moving across the line? 
If so, what course must he pursue? 

In 1901, Art. 8, provisions were made by the 
Annual Meeting for cases of this kind. The decision 
reads: "Members living close to the line may, bv 
mutual consent of both congregations concerned, hold 
their membership in the other congregation, where 
they do not reside; but in all other case's members arc 
required to hold their membership where they reside." 
This gives permission for one, living near the church 
line, to transfer his membership, provided both con- 
gregations consent to the change, and no congregation 
should interfere with one, near the line, holding his 
membership on the side having the greater con- 
veniences for him. Let the brother in question ask 
his home church for permission to transfer his mem- 
bership to the church on the other side of the line If 
agreeable, a letter should be issued to the brothc-. 
and he can then hand it to the other church, explaining 
the situation, of course. If the letter is accepted, that 
settles the transfer. Or, the change may be effected 
by a committee appointed by the first church to confer 
with the other. There may be other ways of making 
the transfer, but it is a thing easily done, where both 
congregations are agreed. On. account of changes 



A MARRIAGE CONTRARY TO THE GOSPEL. 

A sister leaves her husband, and secures a divorce be- 
cause of ill use and because he will not provide for her. 
But she marries another man, and is expelled by "the 
church. If her present husband applies for membership, 
can he be baptized and received, and can the wife be re- 
stored to fellowship, both continuing to live as husband 
and wife? 

For years the Annual Conference had the divorce 
question under advisement, and finally decided that 
there is but one gospel cause for a divorce, with the 
privilege of marrying again, and that is for the cause 
of fornication. The sister did not secure her divorce 
on the ground of fornication, and therefore had no 
gospel right to marry again. It was the duty of the 
church to withdraw fellowship because the plain letter 
of the Gospel had been violated. For the husband to 
come to the church does not change matters. If it is 
a violation of the Gospel for the woman to live with 
the man before he comes to the church, it is equally 
wrong for her to live with him afterwards. In fact, 
it is a marriage contrary to the Gospel and cannot 
be recognized by the church. The Conference urges 
oTir churches to exercise great care in applying the 
decision of the Annual Meeting in case of divorce, 
and to do everything possible to maintain the sacred- 
ness and purity of the marriage relation. 



MANNER OF VOTING. 
Is it necessary for members to attend a special or reg- 
ular council in order to vote on certain questions that they 
know will be up? May they stay at home and write their 
votes and send them with some one who is going? Is a 
written vote legal? 

The proper place to vote, on any church question, 
is at the duly-authorized meetings where the question 
is to be considered, and the votes received. Voting 
by letter would not be considered legal unless special 
provisions should be made for receiving votes in that 
manner. This could not be made the rule, but might, 
by the church assembled in council, be authorized "for 
a special purpose. And yet, after all, it will not he 
for the best interest of the church to authorize much 
of this kind of voting. When there is a council meet- 
ing, all the members, who can possibly be present, 
should attend, so as to be on hand and ready to cast 
their votes when the proper time presents itself. Per- 
mission to vote by letter would tend to decrease the 
attendance at our council meetings, a thing that we 
should not think of doing. 






mbwm 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.-Januaty 26, 1907. 



59 



General Missionary and Tract Department 



D. L. miller, - 
Ii. W. Teeter, - 



OOMMITTI 

Illinois | H. C 
Indiana I C. D. 
John Ztick, lov 



Early, - 

E0O3ttC.lt. 



Virginia 
- D. C. 



-.-■■-., .-„-*7 



Address all baalncst to 
Qeneral Missionary and Tract Committee, Elgin, ffi. 



_ DIVIDING THE SURPLUS. 

One of our readers in Washington sends us a clipping 
from a newspaper. It tells of a great potlach held by some 
Queets Indians. Potlach means giving away. And these 
red men have a custom which prevents any of them 
becoming very much richer than the others. The Indians 
make their money by catching salmon; and most of us 
would be very glad to make as much as thev sometimes 
do. 

When one of these men becomes ( possessed of an un- 
usual accumulation of worldly goods he calls his friends 
together and distributes among them a large portion of 
.his savings. Whether he selects the poorest of his friends 
is not said; but it would seem that he must do so or de- 
feat the purpose which he has in view— the equalizing of 
possessions. 

Some persons think that a white man's potlach would be' 
a good thing, and that some of the most wealthy men of 
our country could dispose of part of their millions 
■ among the poor in the large cities. No doubt there are 
many poor people to whom a little money would be a 
blessing. But money given is not always a blesing; some- 
times it is just the opposite. Many gifts do harm in- 
stead of good. The receiver is not able to manage what 
he gets, and when it is gone he is less able to cope with 
the world and earn his living than he was before. This 
is not always the case, but it very often is; and that fact 
should make givers more thoughtful but not less generous. 
A general dividing up would not make us a stronger or 
a better people. 

There are other ways of getting rid of one's surplus. 
One of them is in the work churches are trying to do at 
home and abroad among those who have not yet been en- 
rolled under the banner of our King. A giving away to ad- 
vance this work might well be held among us; not by one 
person for the sake of helping others not so fortunate and 
~2 °t * n ne ed. We do not know how many of our members 
are rich and increased in goods and have need of nothing. 
But there is good reason to believe the number is not 
small, for we are a frugal people who do not like to live 
on charity. If each year we could hold a potlach in every 
congregation in the Brotherhood and place on the altar 
merely our surplus for the preceding twelve months we 
would get some idea of the amount of money that is be- 
ing heaped up by us as a church 

And if this were done in the right spirit just once, the 
windows of heaven would be opened and there would be 
poured out upon us such temporal and spiritual blessings 
as we do not even dream of at the present time. This has 
happened and is happening to individuals; why may it 
not happen to a whole congregation — to all the congre- 
gations? A brother once said in regard to" his giving that 
the more he gave, the more he had to give. He had "ex- 
perienced the fulfillment of the promise. But men are 
held responsible for their giving as well as for their with- 
holding; thoughtless and indiscriminate giving comes near- 
er to being a crime than to being charity. 

We must be careful not to get into our heads the idea that 
our surplus is the amount we cannot well use ourselves; for 
that idea is misleading and false. Surplus should mean 
for us what we can get along without. Giving what we 
have no use for is much like serving -the world as long as 
we are capable of doing service and then asking God to ac- 
cept the poor, worthless remnant of our lives. In neither 
case is the offering well-pleasing to him from whom our 
all has-been received. Such gifts have about them not one 
element of sacrifice; we have denied ourselves nothing in 
order to make them; in fact, it is rather a relief to dispose 
of what is useless to us. The custom of the heathen In- 
dian is much more praiseworthy than such giving, even 
though it be done as a religious service. 

Many times we withhold more than is meet, and it tends 
to poverty, the worst kind of poverty, that of the soul. 
The man who dressed in fine linen and fared sumptuously 
every day had a very lean soul. And he may have breth- 
ren among us, for the human nature of to-day is not very 
different from that of two thousand years ago. There are 
thousands to-day who would be as glad to have the crumbs 
from our spiritual tables as Lazarus would have been to 
have the crumbs of the sumptuous fare of the rich man. 
And we withhold even as he did. What do we expect the 
result to be? With nearly nineteen centuries of Christian 
teaching behind us, are we very much better, very much 



even the 

for him 

is not to 

should see 



more charitable than was the man whom the Savior held 
up as a warning example to all ages? 

The disposition one makes of his surplus, and 
amount which he places in the surplus fund, is 
to settle with God and his own conscience. It 
be expected, it is not to be desired, that 
alike when it is a question of where the money for reli- 
gious work shall be applied. One knows more about the 
needs of one place, and so is more interested in supplying 
them; another knows more about a different place, and 
his interest is there. Each must follow his best judgment 
Only let no one forget that he has a surplus and is under 
obligation to use it to the best possible advantage. 

G. M. 

<S> <S> <3> . 
"HOW I FOUND THE BRETHREN." 
By birth I am a Hindu. Thirty-three 
born in Surat, India. 

At the age of eighteen, I came to America, working my 
way as a sailor, in view of obtaining an English educa- 



FROM BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 

To-day Bro. W. B. Yount, of Bridgewater, Va ' took the 

garner Hamburg for Naples. From there hc ^™ 

Egypt to spend some weeks, and then to Palestine A° 

the latter place he proposes spending some Mm H stu 

i the American School in Jerusalem. He gav 

I 

leged 

sus 

lot seen, and yet hav 



, ' '" jciuAAicm, tne cave it 

class" WHl/h "V 050 ° f °" r ^""day light Bib. 
tost Z R„ ° r" ,""'" a Wc " i,,ff '<" bei "S Privilege, 
Z,T: m °' y Land ' yct he "^bers that Tes„s one, 



lid, " Blessed are [hey that have "i 
■lieved." 



Yesterday a stster sailed to Austria to brine; her 



years ago I was 



don. 

Among the first things I did in New York City was to 
attend divine services. I soon saw that the religion of 
Jesus was far superior to my heathen religion; hence I 
abandoned "my idol god" and turned with full purpose 
of heart to the Lord Jesus Christ as my Savior from sin. 

By and by an opportunity presented itself to me from 
a Christian gentleman to work my way through Prof. 
Geo. D. Hale's private school. These four years of school- 
ing meant more for me than I can express. They qual- 
ified me for a position with the Western Electric Com- 
pany of New York City. After working for this company 
about one year, it was my misfortune, — no; it was my 
fortune as I now see it,— to get sick. I was in the Post 
Graduate Hospital about seven weeks, when I noticed 
an article in the New York Sun headed, "The Dunkers 
Invade New York." Of course this attracted my attention, 
and as it was written in an attractive style I read the 
lengthy article to a finish with more than ordinary interest. 
This article gave me an introduction to the Brethren for 
the first time. There was such a godly ring in this article 
and such a conformity of life to the teaching of Jesus 
that it compelled me to address a letter to Eld. J. Kurtz 
Miller, 5901 Third Ave., Brooklyn, New York. 

But Bro. Miller not being able to answer my letter in 
person, sent Bro. W. M. Howe to see me. However, a 
few days later Bro. Miller called and I knew him, at a 
distance, as he walked toward my bed, yet I had never met 
him in person before. His very walk and appearance 
tallied with the mental picture I had formed of the Breth- 
ren from my reading of the article in the Sunday Sun. 

Indeed, the moments were preciously spent in this 
visit, as no one had visited me in the hospital up to this 
time with whom I could converse heart to heart and tell 
the longing of my soul. 

The fruit Bro. Miller gave me, — oh! how good it did 
taste, — but the taste of a friend in a strange land and sick 
in a hospital was far better to my soul than the taste of 
fruit to my lips. 

Bro. Miller visited me frequently and supplied my little 
needs. Day by day 1 grew stronger and finally the time 
arrived for me to leave the hospital, and the next important 
thing was a place to go; for I had no home. Where should 
I go? Especially when I was informed fire broke out 
where I had been rooming and all my winter clothing, 
suit-case, etc., were destroyed before I received admis- 
sion to the hospital. 

I entered the hospital during the summer, but now it 
was cold winter and not a garment for such weather. 
However, this did not puzzle Bro. Miller, for he was 
able to supply me with a good winter suit, — shoes, stock- 
ings, underwear and all I needed, — from the supply sent 
the Brethren mission from the Sisters' Sewing Societies 
from many parts of the Brotherhood. Perhaps some sis- 
ters composing these sewing societies, at times question 
whether their charity work is helpful to any one. Truly 
believe me, my friends and "doers of the Word," you have 
helped me. More than this, he invited me to stay in his 
home until I regained my usual strength. I am now out 
of the hospital, thank the Lord. I am enjoying the com- 
forts of the mission home. I am gaining my strength 
nicely and feel the Lord is doing much for me. 

1 read the Gospel Messenger with much interest and 
find the articles from India very fascinating. You see this 
is my native home. Like Moses of old, the burden of rav 
heart is for my people in India. I am asking the Lord to 
direct my life, and if it is his will I would gladly spend 
and be spent to teach my people the way of salvation 
through the Lord Jesus Christ. 

The more I study the Brethren church, the more I see 
they live out the spirit of our Master. Can you blame me 
for falling in love with the Brethren church? Could I do 
otherwise than apply for membership? This I did and 
was received into the church of my choice by holy bap- 
tism Jan. 4, 1907. 

As I have always heretofore gone by my heathen name, 
Ranjet Singh, I now at the suggestion of some earnest 
Christian brethren desire to preface my heathen name 
with the Christian name "James;" therefore from hence- 
forth regard me as your brother in the Lord, 

James R. Singh. 
5901 Third Ave., Brooklyn, New York. 



to this country to liv 
Thi 



parents 



ree persons were received into the church here a few 
Hays ago by bapt.sm. Bro. J. Kurtz Miller is now at 
Ehzabethtown College teaching during the Bible term 
hvo pf our members accompanying him. The Helping 
Hand Society, of Gettysburg, Pa., sent us a barrel of 
clothing recently. A sister from Elgin. Til., sent some 
useful articles which doubtless were the product of her 
own hands. Others that have not been mentioned in our 
notes have remembered the work here. May the Lord 
abundantly reward all. 

To-day was mothers' meeting Twenty-two were prcs- 
ent;also eight children. In the city the mothers' meet- 
ing is one place where the mothers may feel perfectly free 
to take the baby. There were seven different European 
countries represented in the meeting to-day. and mothers 
trom five different countries gave five-minute lalks on pre- 
pared subjects. A sister from Scotland spoke of the 
mother's relation to the public school, of her duly to keep 
her children at school regularly and to have them on time 
every day. She also spoke of the -upcrior public school 
advantages of this country. A Danish sister spoke of the 
mother's relation to the family pockclbook. or the earn- 
ings of her husband as well as her own. It is too fre- 
quently the mothers who make the store hills, grocery 
bills, fail to pay them and thus bring reproach upon the 
whole church. A sister representing Sweden spoke of the 
mother's relation to the church. She told us of the great 
change in her life in the past ten years. "My boys went 
to Sunday school to Sister B. and to church. One day 
the little one said to me, ' Mother, why don't you go to 
Sunday school and church?' r told him r must stay home 
to get the dinner. 'Well,' said he, ' T .will ask Sister B. 
who takes care of her dinner"' Sislcr B. was interro- 
gated and she replied that the Lord look care of her din- 
ner. This .mother was thus persuaded in let the Lord 
care for her dinner, and the meal was not burned, One 
day again the boy said: "Mother, was I ever christened?" 
"No," was the reply. "Well, am I nothing? Don't you 
think it is soon time I am something?" The mother re- 
plied. " If you want to be a Christian, why don't you stand 
up when the minister gives the invitation?" 

The boy very soon did stand up for Jesus. Mis brother 
too followed, and how could the mother refuse to come? 
She too came and all three were baptized. Would that 
many, many more mothers could thus solve the Sunday 
dinner problem. One mother spoke of the mother as be- 
ing a companion to her children, and another spoke of 
the mother's relation to the children of oilier mothers. 
Elizabeth Howe. 
5901 3rd Ave,, Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 10. 

^ © ♦ 
FROM NEWPORT NEWS. VA. 

Jan. 5, at 7:30 P. M., we met in our regular quarterly 
council, with eight members present, all of us but two. So 
you see we are not many. Nevertheless wc are doing what 
we can to advance the cause of Christ. M. II. Lambert 
was appointed president of Christian Workers' meeting, 
and Sister Conner secretary and treasurer; J. C. Cline 
secretary of Reading Circle. At a previous meeting Wm. 
K. Conner was elected superintendent of the Sunday 
school, J. C. Cline assistant, and \l. N. Lambert secretary. 
Ways and means for our work were discussed to some 
extent. We hope to make 1907 full of good works. Near- 
ly fourteen dollars was collected at this meeting for cur- 
rent expeness. 

We are very much in need of a sister or two. We hope 
to have more help soon. Who will volunteer to "come 
over and help us?" And who (congregation or individual) 
will volunteer to support the worker or workers? What 
an opportunity I God be praised! In this connection I 
would like to say to those who are contemplating a 
change, look towards Newport News, and the country 
back of it. There are good opportunities here not only 
to work for Christ but for farming, trucking, merchandis- 
ing, teaching, etc. Would be glad to hear from any one 
(enclosing stamp). You may be able to help yourself, and 
we feel sure you could help the church here. 

I will state further that Twill be glad to hear from par- 
ents who have children here. Be sure to give street and 
number, otherwise it would be difficult to find them. 

We have taken as our motto, " In the beginning, God," 
and with this before us we have great hopes, great ex- 
pectations for 1907. Pray for us, brethren and sisters, 
that we may let our lights so shine into the dark and wick- 
ed hearts of this wicked city that many may this year be 
caused to glorify our Father which is in heaven. 

Wm. K. Conner. 

1110 26th St., Newport News, Va., Jan. 10. 



tO 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 26. 1907. 



Notes From Oar Correspondents 



"As cold water to a thirsty soul, so is g ood news f TOm a far country." 

CALIFORNIA. 

oi B FU° M aUey 'tL"* MS -«"P w «d "> council at the house 
ol Kid. Maust. The organization ol the Sunday school 
was computed; Sister Zelplia Snider superintendent, and 
Sister Bertha Maust secretary. Our elder. E. M Wolf 
was chosen delegate to district meeting, to lie held at 
La ton, Fresno Co., Cal., in March. Rro John G Mil- 
ler, on an inspecting tour, was with us and rendered ap- 
preciative services. He preached after our first Sunday 
sehool. on the 6th inst. Bro. Miller was so well pleased 
that he immediately returned for his wife and children - 
Jacob C. Fundcrhiirgh, Mount Hebron, Cal., Jan. 9. 

Glendora church met in council Jan. 12, our elder. J S 
Brubaker. presiding. We re-elected Bro. Brubakcr as our 
elder. Bro. Andrew Hutchison and Bro. D. A. Norcross 
were with us. Sin letters were handed in. Two weeks 
ago we reorganized our Sunday school. Bro. George B 
Uetwiler was re-elected superintendent. Our church and 

in. Lf 1? I)" 5 T §° 0d w ° rki 1S crder and ar = B-W 
m?;i™ fr, Bra A"dre» Hutchison began a series of 

S."„'d , ora.Cairjan T l!. a " enda, " :C " *°° d - CIa ™ Yost, 
Reedley.-Our church council convened Jan. 5. Bro 
D. L. Forney presided. Church officers for the ensuing 
year were elected: Bro. D. L. Forney elder. Bro C Wol- 
tord clerk Bro C. Wolford was elected Sunday-school 
superintendent, Sister Bell Minnix secretary and treasurer 
President for the Christian Workers' meeting wis re- 
elected. Brethren Trover and Fasnacht, of Nampa, Jda- 
™j - j "' us LJinstmas morning we enjoyed a well- 
chofars P r S , ra -f,' S '7" f""?!" 11 -' h >- th ? Sunday-school 
f~J S, .1 St Th , l1rsda >' ° ur S,st <— A ' d Society reorgan- 
ized for the next three months. Sister Shively was elected 
president and Sister Bell Minnix secretary and treasurer 
During- the past three months we held nine meetings with 
an average attendance of seven. Excluding all expend 
tures. we have left in the treasury $5.20. Our new church- 
house is now in course of construction. Liberal donations 
7.1 "S re f clved ,rnm thc southern part of the State 

?o"r itsV I"*™ "! "° mC ? rc P"" 1 "* f° r "> "ery effort' 
for its early completion. Last Sunday Bro Gillett of 
Bntte county. California, delivered a very interes tag dis 
course-Mary E. Shaffer. Reedley. Cal .Jan II g 

'2 T B ro C M~'M fV?"'^ '"""^ hM at T '°P'"> D «- 
i E . r °, M - M - Eshelman was restored to fellowship and 

SMSSL^jSS 0l "" -'->-S,ephentode"r d 



COLORADO. 



Ve F » i " t d?v and Bry al H y ,r i ) Ve K e ! in " lled «>""cil °n New 

lar, for ,h?M c ™F r cs.->tion contributed about seven dol- 
_"„„ L : he J"', ' Years dinner at the St. Joseph mission. 
.Anna L. Bryant. Grand Junction, Colo.. Jan. 14 

Goodhope church met in council at this place Jan. S. 
?\l a, H : Kmzie presiding. Our Sunday school was 

IDAHO. 

day school has been reorganized for th ""' • °" r Su "- 
with Bro S A Bh„,i ■ ensuing quarter. 

Idaho Falls church met m council Jan 12 Eld T P 
keltner presiding. Our elder T T7 r c.- U II ' 

his resignation i Tt [, * t ptd FpdTT' vf", in 
was chosen for one year ,, 1,1 ■ ' Keltner 

n'es of meetings for us -Sarah A P p r , om,sed '° hol.l a se- 
Falls, Idaho. Jan. 14 ' Bur 8 er - R- D. 4, Idaho 

Payette church met in council Tan 19 - i 
having been deferred from Dec 29 Fid 2 V r , eguiar , ouni:il 
expired with the close o? the vf r a' Stlverson's time 
held for elder, as .well as for offi,? V '"c a 1 election was 
Christian WiSjf^Sni^^V^H 7, h °°< »»" 
chosen elder. M. C. Kreitzfr was elected qS"" , Wa , 
superintendent and Mahel Ri„„, e,ected Sunday-school 

&™B^ ri H te SaS„t! j SW^ &J 

sermon, after which TL lectio' ST?Sj. d » mi »'«»ry 
and home missions which am™ . f ," for forei 8" 
and some cents The average l',? 'a f ° rt >- si * dollars 
school is twent.-three w?th aT= attendail « at Sunday 
ty-nine cents. " I'nndav w a V er ?*V° llec ' i ° n of for- 
tius Sunday-school mo n „ d e ay oTer d ,o d , e h d,0 b tUrn " ,e SUr " 
board to be sent to the mission .. t ■ r°!" mission 
Marvel Bowers, New PIyrno„T Id'ah^an^' Idah ° " 



Lanark.— Our series of meetings, beginning Dec. 22, 
closed Jan. 13. with five precious souls added to the church 
w^.liTT', Bm h G \°- h S'-dcbakcr did the preaching 
with Ins nephew. Herbert Studebaker, assisting him in the 
song service the first week. Dee. 27 we held our council 
At Ins meeting a part of the church officers were elected 
our 'i',"!' ■'?' J ' A-. *>ovc has been engaged to conduct 
our next revival meetings, in November, 1907.— Maude 
Newcomer, Lanark, III., Jan. 14. 

Panther Creek church in council decided to use the as- 

f'T» I MMSenmr to call for help in the ministry. 

tl„ „n,l " '"" k !"e •" a location can correspond with 

Roaiiokt T tn U lmth " ra ' ™^ i Pn.-Amos Yordy, 

INDIANA. 

Bro e r he M Ch M r i, h " ,el i ?.™ u « il meeting at Salem, Jan. 12. 
ff T i cl "-' r Pr esided - Our elder. Bro. Manly Deeter 

mXwWf" Which , was a « c P'«i by the church 
and Bro. W. R. Deeter was chosen elder in his place. Two 
letters were received. Bro. S. J. Burger will begin a series 
° t TT r " U' e Sal =-« t h o«se Jan. lo. I, wasTcided to 
ford in M ' G ', Ro >' cr ]°. hold a series of meetings in Mil- 
ford in November, and ,t was also decided to hold a series 
of meetings at the Chapel one year from this spring Bro 
R a D e V R Mi';, e or b d:T,,d "&"!? " S - B " t,la M- We?brigl„: 
^Cp^y^'^)°^ ^Chaoe, 

v,"h S 'n C d r B "< h * M - N <-'l.cr was authorized to preach 
when called upon. Sister Rilla Arnold was elected church 

W^ltmZitt % It'* h — B=,th h a"M h 
ASiofw ""d " S - d an ' 5 ,"' c had "«"'» council Bro' 

?k ^;'m d „:e c ' h h „' re ra d y issr^^ss 

Hol.onN^tn 1 S"" 3 '~^' U « B^Td.'* 
Bro C H r ^ k ;7 WC d h o VC r T e ° r S a "i«d our Sunday school. 

h-tende'nrf' n? g ""i 1 B [°- ,0 '' n ? ilvills were dlos ™ s"Per- 
mrendents. Our school is growing in interest Christian 

pfe -Sef^Si^'^la^cS^S 
Ja a ber b "co.aT C a;'; d I b nVTa e n S" ' aSt ^--^^1 

three sermons and on account of his hoarseness and sev 

rie 1 s ,, of'r„ FO , rk ^ Br0 William Lam P i " commenced a se- 
23 a„°d f c m o„ nufd a" tH^.n T? "t^ in R °^ D "" 

tlnrty three „e7e d > Trn'L J rdu^W T «h;rSing Cla w: d h:v d 
and fwo^inmlrTni'euibcrs 1 - oro' l^V^lfST 

mS„ra1id C sS b o^Si^^rg So' tH? ?!?" 

1. Ke™c7 a „d Pe S pT" C '' WaS ,,dd Jan ^ 12 ' E1 ""S I. 

m a S 7p ar esTd r fng k C B" r r ^ BTwrnan™"'^!, DeC , 8 ' Eld A ' E «- 
.he oJersigh^of the church Eli " E I O °No rcl «" d >"> 
as elder for the coming Tear <™ i , orns . was c "osen 

eIe^on e 'o7 A Su„XTcS o ffi nCil °' a De , C - 26 ' W had *e 
rangements for the ipirt of" and ^ P re |i, m ™^y ar- 
superintendent Bro E I nil, mm 'ster. Our former 
Martha Peterson secretary Thf d e'siJe'of The'si'st' ; ^A^ 
ir^y Sf^ mjssion^S, Vs h fre S e',f L 5 po^ 

to be ma y de g .o pro ; d for ,r s ™„o .''of me -^"hi„ is 
com ng year This „, m „,i, support of a minister the 

srs j:„ in ii ng Ja - »-'» W s s s. i s s„g! 



S'j | u J d , ay . "«"'., resulting in two being buried with 
^d^e-ianill^S^nref^Sil 

Fe'Av'e., Chanute.^s.'.Taiif ' !l "*^ M S " Sa « a 

cl,urch^d R p r r'e n u 1 hed B i ' f' ?""»P-cker came to our 

Fahrney, Sterling, Kans., Jam 14 '"-"Stnenea.— L. t. 

Scott Valley.-Bro. Manon came to us Dec. 29 and gave 

g Sark^as^LnupSS^dJu; and ^ ^E 
ook 1 cor ,;> ;i P onJ i"t. Sunday after Thanksgiving we 

Ss is"t Kit^' VXiks"' fiomf fd ^„fe d t 
worWjW.de mission.-Ella Clark, R. D. 3. WaVr.y Kans , 

LOUISIANA. 

me^pV^ pS r^o^mtaf^arT^n 

suit oTouftw, wer t^Pt^e<i and two recSed fas a re- 

I iS&M a^lrunl^IL- vinihT'wit'h^ 

JKrccs go b : srffisjS 

to hold some meetlngs.-J. I. Miller. Roanoke. La Jan.' 



MICHIGAN. 



Sugar Ridge.-Under the direction of our mission board 
we went to Ferry, Oceana Co., Mich., Jan. Ti W had 

benefit^ tb n e day m ° rni i, g ' ^ e had four meetings for the 

benefit of the few members that live here. There will be 

few""™"™ , " g ,,, a i„ tha ,' P,i,Ce ' h , is Wiiter ' We ho W pe the 
i eu numbers cm locate somewhere so they can have 

2 SU cts,er: h fiiih a , nd aS h 16 Ch *™^-l *■ Lair," ^S 
MINNESOTA. 
Winona.— The work here is moving along nicelv with 
good attendance at Sunday school. We have been re 

o n tor a v d r?aidT a o"d y hf° 0d ' hi "- gS for r thc P°9f HoW 
ti ev are do ,,j (' Wcss our sisters for the good work 

tliey are doing for our missions! When a call comes for 
help, how soon their willing hands respond. We have 
received donations from various places and now tlmk 

MISSOURI. 

Cabool church met in council Jan. S. Our love feast was 

.?ng°eme ts'ive^m' f , T "'° ^ ™" e ^.«." K 
Ian 1?^, i j adE j'? commence a series of meetings 

^^-"S d d| B a f Jer S - Sn^ur^l 
!$i. S°dwe ^t Cd he pSrplfof God-B^pt" nTisVo 
Gr^ro^li 3 - 3 - M ' S '" CnS ' R - ° ' Mou!,^ 
Fairview congregation met in council Jan. 12, BiV, , ,, 
Je, e'l" , P nT' dmg ' T "'° IeUcrs of membership were'' re- 
Cl ristmasdar A"' ^ an ,' ed - WC met for » orshi P on 
c-nnstnias day. A collection was taken up for the St 
Joseph mission.-Lizena Hylton, R. D. 1, Macomb? Mo !,' 

Shelby County church met in council Jan. 5. All of the 
old church officers were reelected except correspondent 
Our Sunday school was reorganized for six months, with 
Bro. J A. Lapp superintendent. We held services Christ- 
mas day. A collection of JR75 was taken for the St To 
seph miss.on._Eva Bailey, Cherry Box. Mo Jan 16 ' 
NEBRASKA. 

Kearney church met in council Jan. 5. Our elder S M 

^^wTeS^ry^l^ 

A J. Nickey was elected elder; Bro. T. F Fvans was 
chosen Sunday-school superintendent. Jan 14 Bro Tacoh 

et -m' ffl M M R a n Tt '" r S '""" e '""' was an J on, . b 
en. Martha L. May, R. D. 1, Kearney, Nebr., Jan. 14. 



ILLINOIS. 

. Hurricane Creek,— Bro Ch 3e itr v 

■ng for us on Christmas day and i ar ° U1 besan P r "eli. 

m tins, ^- ~;^p -fstainsi 

^ !: .C ] ,i„kaboS,.Jw^.Ij a ^ r ,-, I --e G g^ 



., KANSAS. 

Altamont church met in council Ian 12 K m F c r 

ST-ool'oSerl^ at_|™ ^ 

?aJi ?ur P ?hZ\h„s1 ,e a d „d 5 Tf Mf ^ ™°tcide^ 
ments. Our Chris mas " make otl,er "eeded improve- 

a* a wr h ^BiS«^ ssk 

Mollie Morris f, Sn K f e ? A ' d S ° C ' ety - Sise " 
^■■a Baker ,reas„?e71 d K n a;',e K C ce J ^L S o e ,". C, Ka y „s Si jT„ r 



OHIO. 

Ki?i an 1 f°";r It ™ as ou '" P rivi 'ese, along with Bro. S. W 

5^0 '^-^°^, a s-n?r^^r^ 

P^»;reSicT^;Sefa^^^^ 
orJfflSr- 1 - ^'yea^anS^ot^s Sd- 

SSStfPSSSSS 

$10.30 1,, s , be sen" ' ,o"hf«nira? '"• ''' SPri "^ and 
R. H. Workman, Loudonvill!, g O e iuo, a jan'T4° nary ' U,ld '- 
OREGON. 
Myrtlepoint— Council was held Jan 12 Ian 5 was ,h 
regular time, but on account of the valley being flood H 
with water it was deferred. We took coiler fo f ( a ? . d 
fcrent nnrnoses Ti,^ tc collections for dif- 

■ crent purposes. The officers were reelected for our Bi- 



"'vTecr«^v My GwE M S !tZ presidmt and N ™cy Bark- 
'"" secretary. Church officers were also reelected I r 

Bops &&r £ sss? is B ^ e ^ 22? 

e 8 r 3 "' Z n 1 d ee° t i„ r K eVer f[,r n ofr <,a fh y bC " 0<)1 a " d Christian Work-" 
PENNSYLVANIA. 

E F. Claar. K^pTJTu *"*"' '* * *f *• * J 

sS m Pa n , Ja a „ r "?6 Sb -" rg - J - C M ° ck ' R - D " rSriS 

recitations, etc principally £,' tt'chMr £"£ ™ ddr'els 
was given by T W D Dcinlnrff ti i* j auaress 

is small but very promising. Our present Sunday schoo 
targ^kTja^'" laS ' Sund ^-J W. Hershey, y Get,°y?! 

ae^tm'n?^ 'l'"' C1 i urches ° f Midd| e Pennsylvania: On 
account of the ong distance to Annual Meeting this year 
he same requiring possibly a little more getting ready for 
the person elected as member of Standing Committee it il 

en^li ^I^a^n^SL^^rr af^^ic^ 

time a notice ml] be published announcing said meet ng 

-J. C. Swigart, Sec, R. D. 1. Lewistown, Pa Jan g°"' ng 

Philadelphia (First Brethren Church).-Dee 28 we held 

re„ r derel' Stn ( , aS T S "' Si,,sin S and recitations w re 
rendered, after which each scholar received an orange 
and a box of candy. Jan. 7 we held our council Our 

r™lS^l' a '"' EM - T ° llii,S «yer S . presided 
f'T5 . ers of membership were granted. We expect to 
hold extra meetings next month.-Sallie B. Schnell 1544 
N. Marvine St., Philadelphia, Pa-.. Jan. 13. 3cnne ". 1M4 
Reading.— A greater and deeper interest is manifested 
in the prayer meetings and all other church work s , ce 
Bro. Weaver has taken hold of the work. We are now 
organized into a branch of the Christian Workers and 
nticipate great results therefrom. Sunday evening Bro 
nid t e |„ F ?, nd W ' fe , • r ° m R °J"=rsford «™ info our 
Sunday ,o 1 * 8 ' er delver ? d a stirring sermon. Our 
Sunday ,.,ioo! is increasing ,n membership, as well as in 

ng, Pa Jan rgy r "' M ° y "' 834 N ' 6th Sf " Read " 

Rockton.— It is two years since our first Christian 
Vorkers' meeting. We organized in January, 1905 We 
lect our officers every six months. Our free-will offerin-is 
mount to $24.82. We thank God for these neing and 
fSCSr^S&fSl'jSf ?*«* » ^-ElSbSn 
Shamolrin.— Since, our last report another precious soul 

fmS, 0llt f0 r- We are " OW engaged jn a series 
meetings, to continue two or more weeks We are 

izi^izj""- s - s ' Bcavcr ' 600 w - Pine st - 

e SP 1g g , R , U ?-~ Br0 ' J " 1- S,,eaffer came >"<° our midst 
ec 29 and began a series of meetings in the Pine Glen 
urch, continuing till Jan. IS. Bro. Sheaffer delivered 
,enty-onc inspiring sermons. We feel that he Ins 
rengthened the whole church spiritually. Sixteen pre- 
3iis souls were received into the church by baptism 
ree reclaimed and two more await the sacred rite We 
:1 very much encouraged. A Christian Workers' meer- 

IdrM° r ».f, n ' Ze 'lv Wl,ich Wi " meet "«* S "" da >- even , g. 
Ida M. Miller, Mattawana, Pa., Jan 17 

West Johnstowru-Bro Alva J. Spacht was with us oyer 

»h, u He (""eaehed morning and evening in the 

"H h ,° M se . ° n Saturday night he preached in the 

H i" .i 10 ""', His sermons were instructive and 

Jan Ts Re P lo S le ' 1316 Virginia Ave.. Johnstown, 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 
Willow Creek church met for yearly council Jan 5 
o letters were accepted; one was granted; two isolated 
ono- Sv e S ""i th£ P. lv . lIe g e of choosing, each from 
T«n A 7 1*\* min l ster - Our Sunday school was 
rgamzed, also the home department work. The Sisters' 

deml y w 3S g ' V< i n p ? wer t0 carr >' on th eif work inde- 
etf„i y i, d are D '°oking forward to a series of revival 
n*Sf . «°' Ra,s, °" sometime during the month.- 
ud Hurst Horning, Delhi, S. Dak Jan 8 



THE GOSPEL MESS ENGER.-January 26, 1907. 

Manassas congregation held her council Tan S Permis 

«" for* fhe" o^nVyfafareVti ffS^^F 
president of Christfatf Wo kerf E E BlouS TI L ? m j 

I I iJ t V Ve, ; n<m church met in council Jan. 12 our elder 

tgpjw 36 * Fu-bL^ r cct«t?i 
=^^c!^f^ds.^-w- s? ta rs3SI 

Peters Creek church has just enjoyed a very interesting 
series of meetings, conducted by Bro C E EBer H? 

HwlilTn i"^ !'"-' °!, hcr ,' WO a »' ait * '™ =- 
j. n. vvimmer, K. D. 1, Salem, Va., Jan. 14 

Redoak Grove church met in council Jan. 12 Bro Wm 
Ves, presiding We decided to hold two series of mce,: 
ings, one at Stonewall this winter, one of our regular 

S h, "f ';°" ,tS: ° ne at , lhis chllrch beginning abou! he 

middle of August, provided we can get a minister at that 

time-Ella Bowman. R. D. 5, Box 4, h'loyd Va jan 14 

Troutville.-EIch S. A. Honberger began a series of 

r'T" . our Tdn , ity house Dcc 30 a " d continued tSl 
Jan. 8, preaching twelve sermons. The second meeting a 

y hn fn ma " frr ; m , ' h '; C " y ° ( Roanoke "PP'ied for meSSfcr- 
ship and was later baptized in that city Six others sub- 
sequent y came out on the Lord's side, five of whom were 
baptized and one awaits the rite. This was the conclusion 
of Bro. Honbcrger's meetings in Virginia, and it was an 

mui, v"h me , et ' ng - W f, fe t! ,ha ' '"e church in his com" 
mum y has been greatly benefited. He spent over four 

9hlf.n\ V 'Tr ri hdd ( ieI,t scri « of nieetings Jan 
9 he left for Cabool, Mo., where he is now engaged in a 
meetag. This was his first and may be his last visit to 
the Old Dominion.— C. D. Hylton, Troutville, Va.. Jan 15. 

WASHINGTON. 

Centraha church met in council, with Bro. Geo. C Carl 
as moderator Three letters of membership were granted 
Sunday school was reorganized, with Bro Chas Ives su- 
perintendent Instead of using the regular program for 
Christian Workers meeting we decided to have a Bible 
study for a season; Bro. C. N. Stutsman as teacher. Bro 
Uavid Eby was chosen presiding elder for one year — 
Anna Myers. Centralia, Wash., Jan. 8. 

Mount Hope.— We reorganized our Sunday school, with 
Bro. Isaac Teeter superintendent. Bro. Sherman Clapper 
and Bro. J. o. Strecter. our home ministers, began a se- 
ries of meetings Dec. 23. and preached till Dec. 28 when 
our elder, Amos B. Peters, came and preached four ser- 
mons, and was with the Mount Hope church at her first 
council after organization. Dec. 29 the home ministers 
again took up the work and preached each night until 
Jan. u. fourteen came out on the Lord's side; twelve 
were baptized and two await baptism. Bro John O 
btreeter went to Spokane Jan. 11. to preach a funeral 
and hold a series of meetings.— Mary C. Hixson, Chewe- 
lah. Wash., Jan. 14. 

WISCONSIN. 
Hannibal—Eld. T. D. Van Buren is now located here. 
We have preaching services twice each Lord's Day We 
organized a Sunday school Dec. 23 for the present quar- 
ter. We have good attendance at all our services We 
have only six members living here; would like to see oth- 
ers locate here and help the work along. Homes can be 
bought at reasonable prices. Brethren wishing to change 
their locations should come and see this part of Wisconsin 
—Mrs. Viola Michael, Hannibal, Wis., Jan 13 



61 



wlil ?ppen P r a m tin? M " * ^"^ ^'^ a «>»* ' 

Standing Committee 
with churches small 
in spirit. 
Ft Wayne, l„d '" H ' Ebv 



Well 

- A. A. Sut- 

is to represent the district on the 

Ihus closed a district meeting 

number, but large in territory and 



ADVANTAGE AND PROFIT 

"hat Kilvantnce then hnlli ths I .«.■• 
in circumcision?— R„,„. 3 . , ' "' "'" a i"'°nl Is there 

Almost evcrv reliivi,.,,^ .i 
cial advantage -wth^e it mT" " ^'^ *""" ""'- 
another numerical s c , , „ ,''"-""-' -cession. 

oracles of God" This fi, , , comn "»«l 'he 

sponsibihty beca,J c „ "J, [T ' I "»' a '""<"> "- 

oracle, info their custody c ™'»"" d " "is sacred 

Now, beloved, do we claim any advantage' Surelvl 
Is it not our mission to pre-ic], t„ ,i, , , b " rclv! 

world-the whole GospclP . , , 1 I'* ~'. " ""^ 
ted the oracles of God" Do we re ' "" C °","""- 

'ha. this advantage binds upon i.o " U "W™™'* 

Profit is the result of the judicious use of the „l, , 

we may have. If we ignore. «„ ,, u „ T 

tage we will lose the profit. We can't iM c, • ,i 
.ermos,par,softheear,h ; ''„ec::;'a,rX,,;v':a!;'; 
n rs As": m °'r y ' b '" "' e "" "" M " '" convert ".! 

$ 'htom^d'rr^:: ^~t: i« - 
S~r a " d -a^,-;" S ,r£ 

he advantage we have over others, instead of bringing „ 
is profit may be a detriment, for "he thai knew Ins Mas 
ter s will and did it „„, shall be beaten with many ri p '' 

Brethren, let us live the w e Gospel, whether it 1. 

■ng, going, or doing unto others! And ,n the 
shall come home bringing ,„„■ sheaves will, .... 
Panora. Iowa. J D Haughtelin. 



- glv- 
evening we 



CORRESPONDENCE 



"Write whnt thou seest, and send it unto the churches. 1 



TENNESSEE. 

'thr^ n \. V ' eW ""iregation met in council to-day, with 
thren Vines and McKeehan. After the council Bro. 
es gave the church a splendid admonition. The minis- 
h a n H eCt,n , g , was J ,eld at 'his church Dec. 28. Owing to 
bad weather the attendance was not very large We 
a splendid program and the topics were well discussed. 

■ Good was here, and on Sunday morning he gave a 
day-school talk that was very interesting.— N T Lari- 
, K. D. 3, Jonesboro, Tenn., Jan. 12. 

VIRGINIA. 
Slrfajt church met in council Jan. 12, with our elder 
I. Sanger, presiding. Elders M. G. Early and A a' 
d/,, W " C W ri ? S - flections were held for ministers 
deacons. Brethren Lewis B. Flohr and B F Miller 
- chosen as ministers, and E. E. Neff and David Shif- 
;in, a a COn , S - J i" were ' ns 'a'Ied. Sister Vertie Neff was 
nrited church correspondent for this year. Sunday 
01 was reorganized with Brethren R. J. Miller and 

■ Wilcox superintendents. Our secretary, Bro. Lewis 

*;«f" r . eport °L ,I,C last year ' s work - Member! 
at the beginning of 1906. 123; number received by let- 
unng year, 8; number by baptism, 12; letters granted 



MINISTERIAL AND DISTRICT MEETING OF 

TEXAS AND SOUTHWESTERN LOUISIANA. 

These meetings were held at Roanoke, La.. Dec. 27 and 

28. It affords us much joy spiritually to meet with the 

members of this large district in conference work. 

Tile ministerial meeting was organized at 10 A. M., with 
Eld. A. J. Wine, of Texas, as foreman. Several topics of 
general interest .were discussed with spirit and power. 

The district meeting convened at 9 A. M. After the 
opening exercises the organization resulted in Eld. J. A. 
Miller moderator, J. F. Hoke reading clerk, and Eld. A. A. 
Sutter writing clerk. The reading of Acts IS, with re- 
marks, was followed by the reading of the rules governing 
the meeting. 

The mission work of the district led in interest, and was 
followed by a report of the year's work. Elders J. A. 
Miller and A. J. Wine, both of Texas, are giving their 
time and efforts to the work. These brethren arc sup- 
ported by the district, assisted by the General Mission 
Board. Then Elders J. C. Minnix and A. A. Sutter gave 
a report of their work, they each giving only a part of 
their time to the work. 

There have been a number of new preaching points 
opened. During the last year fifteen have been added to 
the church by baptism. In the district there ate six local 
churches, with a total membership of one hundred and 
eighty-five, eight elders, four ministers in the second de- 
gree and four in the first degree. There has been an in- 
crease of membership over 1905 of thirteen, of the elder- 
ship two and of the first degree of the ministry four, and 
a decrease of two in the second degree. The district 
treasurer's report was read and very satisfactorily accept- 



ABOUT ROANOKE, LOUISIANA 
I write while at Houston, Tex., having closed my work 
a. Roanoke, La., last evening. I am this far ,.„ ,„y way to 
Manvel, Tex to assist that church one week and , hen re- 
turn home via Roanoke, Jan. 21. 

At Roanoke we labored three hours each weekday ex- 
cept Saturday, teaching in Bible work, and preached each 
evening Seven dear souls were baptized yesterday, two 
reclaimed, and two promised to come ,,, ,l,e itilure. So 
all were rejoicing. 

I am convinced thai we inusl travel a long distance to 
find a more spiritually disposed and a more energetic 
body of members than we found at Roanoke They stand 

Wh !"V,°, 77; '" ""'"' ""•' li,il ' s ' comparing numbers. 
While Eld. J. Minnix ,s in charge, be has to his assistance 
Eld. A. A. Sutter, and Bro. Joel Glick in the second de- 
gree and Brethren Frank Hoak and Robert Harris in the 
first degree of the ministry. This body of ministers has 
excellent talent as a whole, and with their loyally to the 
Gospel and principles of the church we bespeak for Un- 
church much prosperity. Eld. M ix is also blessed 

with a faithful corps of deacons. 

The church supports a spiritual Sunday school and 
Christian Workers" meeting. At the close of the ten days' 
Bible normal they organized to continue their Bible study 
placing Bro. R. Harris in charge. This church is by no' 
means lagging even on account of the warm climate of the 

^"'h' L. II. Eby. 

Jan. 14. 3 



REED, GREER COUNTY, OKLAHOMA. 
Wife and I, in company with Bro. Sylvanus Hartman, 
left home for the Hcasant Plains schoolhouse, a distance 
of sixty-four miles, in the bounds of the Harrison church, 
Kiowa county, to fill some appointments. We traveled by 
private conveyance,— two bronchos to a hack. On the 
second day at about 2 P. M. we reached Bro. Whitlock's. 
That evening we filled the appointment, and on the fol- 
lowing day, Sunday, we preached in the morning at 10 
A. M., also in the evening, making three sermons, each 
being attended by attentive hearers. It is said thai this 
is Ihc first time the Gospel has been preached at that place. 
We believe it would be a good place for an opening 
for the Brethren. The members, three in number, were 
much encouraged and wished we could have remained a 
week or ten days. But we could not at that lime. We 
returned home after an absence of a few days. We need 
more workers in Greer county; twelve is our number at 
present, with a large field. We need a missionary wagon. 
Bro. Neff made a start, who will keep it up? 

P. S. Harlman. 
R. D. 2. Reed. Greer Co., Okla.. Jan. 12. 



B 



62 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 26, 1907. 



FROM JALALPOR, INDIA. 
Several weeks ago we came home from a ^toiir in sev- 
eral villages. In making a straight line from the village 
by the sea, where we tarried for awhile, we passed five 
villages where plague rages. Jalalpor is one of the five. 
Scarcely a man was to be found in either village, though 
each is a large town, having above a thousand inhabit- 
ants. These are villages in which we camped last year 
and places we often visit. It is truly distressing and sad- 
dening to pass through just now, for some have died. 
Hear them wail! See those women beat their breasts 
till they are the worse for it! And the little children, yet 
worse off, for the mother's milk ceases to flow sometimes 
after such seasons. 

Our well-respected Jamidar, next police officer to Foz- 
dar, went into a plague village to investigate a case of 
stealing and house burning. He tarried over night there. 
Night air within plague areas is said to be very danger- 
ous. He came home, soon took the plague, and went off 
to Surat, his home town, and died. There is plague in 
nearly every town in our taluka, where we would go to 
teach the people. We may have to go elsewhere this 
year, lest we walk into danger. In North Gujerat plague 
alsft> rages. It is wonderful, wonderful that it continues 
to waste this country, and wonderful how people are get- 
ting used to it. 

A month ago we wrote that we had put two or three 
children in the town school here and that all was going 
well. But my letter had barely left India's strand when 
I might have written otherwise, for the school that ordi- 
narily has from one hundred and twenty-five to one hun- 
dred and forty pupils, on account of our Christian chil- 
dren, dwindled down to forty children. Plague came 
along and closed the school. But even in ten days the 
people had gotten furious over our children's coming. 
We were away in the villages preaching Jesus. I guess 
it was good, too, that we were away. The two best edu- 
cated men in the village did the kicking. It was easy for 
the rest, like sheep, to follow in objecting to Christians 
sitting in the school. " Let them sit on the veranda, or 
apart, with the Dhedas, where they belong," said they. 
Even the assistant collector has written me on the sub- 
ject. In reply we answered, " If a Christian government 
does not give equal rights with others to 'her own' and 
especially of the third generation, we shall be very sorry 
and much surprised." The case is now in the hands of 
the deputy educational inspector. We anxiously await the 
outcome. The people think they will win: we think we 
shall. Heretofore in other places the same fight has had 
to be fought, but generally or always with success for 
the Christians. This evening I went into town to see 
whether the school is going or not. I asked a teacher 
about it. He answered that the children are not coming. 
I asked why. He said, " Because of your two children." 

Last Sunday we spent in Bombay. In the morning a 
preacher, a young fellow fresh from America and fresh 
from college evidently, spoke to a small audience. He 
was the " starchiest and trimmest " fellow I have seen 
for three years. How precise he was! His sermon was 
very good, and would have been better if he had known 
where to put his hands. He came to work in Marathi, 
in Bombay. A missionary said to me, " Never mind, this 
India sun will soon enough get that clergyman's coat off 
of him, and soon enough knock all that starch out of 
him; and then how will he appear?" In the evening we 
went to the High Church of England, a fine churchhouse, 
with six large fans overhead and worked by coolies out- 
side; two preachers and a dozen or so small boys in white 
gowns, prayers read or rather intonated by preacher and 
then "amen" in turn intonated by both people and or- 
gan, etc., for about half an hour. Being tired, we left, 
saying, " Give us the simple worship of the Brethren." 

An intelligent young fellow (French) and I sat waiting 
for a doctor. He was on his way to Afghanistan in be- 
half of the French Museum, of Paris. Something like 
the following conversation ensued: "I suppose you are 
a Christian." " Certainly, why not? I am a Catholic." 
"Do you read the Bible?" "Read that book! Never! 
How could I understand a book so difficult? " " What, 
you a college boy and can't understand the Bible? Grant 
that you cannot understand it all, there is much you can 
easily know, if you wish to. For the revealed things, 
things we need to know, the way of salvation is so plain 
that 'wayfaring men, though fools, shall not err therein.'" 
He answered, " No, none but the priests can understand 
it, and they understand it only as the pope shows it to. 
them. We are the oldest church, and the pope is a direct 
descendant from St. Peter. We know we are right with- 
out reading. We hear it read." " Well, brother, buy a copy 
and read the Book as a book then, will you? It may be 
had for five cents. Jesus whom you adore and whom we 
love said, not only to priest and pope, but to one and all, 
' Search the Scriptures, for in them ye think ye have 
eternal life.' " " 1 never thought of that," he said, '.' I 
may do it." We parted, each going His way. 

This time we remained in Bombay for four days. And 
beggars? It must pay or else, they would quit the busi- 
ness. On every corner, on every main road, in the way 
of every public building, pleading hands outstretched to- 
ward every passer-by. I thought, " Well, if we knew how, 
to persist with sinners in that way the kingdom of God 



would soon come in power." I picked up a paper, and 
on it was written the following, a little opposite to my 
thought for the moment: "There is needed one more re- 
vival among Christians— a revival of Christian giving. 
When that revival comes the kingdom of God will come 
in a day." 

Shortly after our crowd came out to India another 
party, for another mission, came. Among them was a 
fine young man I learned to love on first acquaintance. 
While in Bombay this time I found him on his back with 
fever. He has had fever often now for two years. It 
has been especially hard on him this summer. One day 
his temperature went down to ninety-five. Within an 
hour it passed to one hundred and six. And "I almost 
hold my breath and say, " He didn't die." A doctor was 
called, for they had a right to call one. In spite of all 
his fever he would not take a drop of medicine, no, not 
so much as you might put in one eye. The doctor said, 
" It is nothing but a bad case of fever," and advised 
medicine. Some people of that mission die refusing to 
take medicine. Others take it. They hold that Jesus is 
healer of body as well as of our souls. At last the boy 
became certain that it was death or medicine. His own 
people told him the same. The day I left he got the con- 
sent of his mind to take quinine. He told me he had 
peace of mind over it. This is one extreme. 

Jesus said, "Take no thought for your life, what ye 
shall eat," etc. Suppose one does not work, but lies on 
his back all day and prays God to give him daily bread. 
Will he? Then, suppose we do not use the faculties and 
common sense God has given us and by prayer expect 
him to heal us, we having not done a whit toward our 
recovery, are we not as presumptuous as the man who 
does not work and yet expects a living, saying, " God 
owes it to me"? Hasn't God healed you in answer to 
your prayer for healing, after you had done what you 
knew, taken the medicine 3>ou knew to be useful in said 
case? He has me. Let us praise him, for he is the Great 
Physician. If we do, our faith is as great as the other 
fellow's and more sensible, it seems to me. 

Jalalpor, Surat, India, Dec. 13. I. S. Long. 



Who of us will see the close of the coming year? Should 
the angel of death call for us, are we prepared? May all 
be ready when the summons comes. The only way to be 
sure of this is to live in a state of preparedness. Then 
when the summons comes it will be only a step into the 
beyond. A. W. Vaniman. 

Pasadena, Cal. 



NEW YEAR'S EVE THOUGHTS. 

As I sit and think upon the year that will draw to a 
close in a few hours, my mind dwells upon the events of 
1906. As they pass in review before me, I find it an 
interesting study. For the most of us the year has passed 
about the same as other years. But for some it stands 
out prominently in their lives. 

In California the great San Francisco earthquake makes 
this a year long to be remembered by hundreds and thou- 
sands of people. It was awful in its ravages, but it showed 
again that death and disaster make all the world akin 
especially among Christian nations. The great advance- 
ment in the telegraph, transportation and newspaper 
facilities make assistance possible where it otherwise would 
not be. One hundred years ago such an exhibition of 
helpfulness would have been impossible because of the 
lack of facilities. Surely we are in the time foreseen by 
Daniel, when "men shall run to and fro, and knowledge 
shall be increased." This is one of the indications of the 
"time of the end." But how long this condition of things 
should exist before the end of this age is not stated. 
God's people, the Jews, are gradually gathering to their 
homeland, and one can see the budding of the fig-tree, 
but we should always remember that the Lord has plenty 
of time to carry out his plans, although that should never 
cause any one to become careless, like the unfaithful serv- 
ant. 

The year that is now closing has been one of immense 
temporal prosperity in the United States. While the year 
has closed with plenty for the majority in America, there 
is in progress one of the greatest famines known for years 
in parts of China, and the government contemplates call- 
ing upon other nations for assistance. 

It is with pleasure that we think of the fact that the 
past year included in its program the inauguration of a 
mission in China, and I trust the coming year may witness 
its consummation. On the other hand, when I think and 
realize how much we as a church might do if we were prop- 
erly trained, it makes me sad that our foreign mission 
work has not advanced further than it has. But we are 
growing and we ought to be thankful for that. 

From what we can see and hear a good many of our 
brethren are planning for the trip to California this year, 
at or before the time of the Annual Meeting. For the 
first time will the Conference be held in the heart of a 
large city, but we hope and believe that it will prove satis- 
factory to our people. There will be no occasion for any 
one to go hungry or houseless and no one will be com- 
'pelled to board any place against his will, for there are 
places galore, from the high-priced hotel to the ten-cent 
restaurant and lunch room. Rooms can be had from $1.50 
a week to several dollars a day. Street cars will take you 
from the place of meeting to any part of the city for a 
nickel. This may require a change of cars with a free 
transfer. Further information will be given later. 

The past year has witnessed the close of the career of 
many who were useful in the world. Many who were 
with us a year ago have been gathered by the reaper who 
is no respecter of persons. The question naturally arises, 



FROM SOUTHERN ILLINOIS. 

The mission board of Southern Illinois met Jan. 1. 
Various phases of the work were considered. The Spring- 
field mission received special attention. The preaching 
has been supplied by adjoining ministers. Sisters Alma 
Crouse and Myrtle Watson are the workers located. 
Their report for the quarter in part is as follows: Three 
preaching services each Sunday; average attendance, 14; 
one Sunday school, average attendance, 28; attendance on 
Christmas exercises, 60; average collection, 52 cents; 
calls made in the homes, 371; Messengers distributed, 359; 
children's papers, Visitors and Inglenooks, 340; tracts, 
740; clothing, 157 pieces; 10 pairs shoes. 

We trust the sisters' aid societies of our district will 
remember this part of the work. A number of boxes have 
already been received and contents distributed, which, we 
believe, has opened the doors of many hearts and homes 
to our workers. We have also started a separate fund 
for this mission, and appeal to our Sunday schools and 
Christian Workers in Southern Illinois to remember this 
fund with their collections. 

Individuals of the committee have purchased property 
located on the corner of North Fourth and East Grand 
Ave., at a very reasonable price, which will be rented by 
the committee and held for a time to be turned over to 
the district if so desired. This is a splendid location, less 
than a block from our present mission, and a very de- 
sirable place for a church. Solicitors will be appointed to 
solicit funds for the securing of this property to the dis- 
trict and building a suitable house of worship, which is 
much needed. 

Decatur. — By request of the Okaw church, the com- 
mittee resumes the management of the Decatur work, the 
church agreeing to share in the expense. The needs of 
the mission will be looked into more fully and we may 
have something more to say about the work later. 

Colchester.— Eld. M. L. Halm has been located at this 
point since July, and is now devoting all his time in an 
effort to rebuild the old Camp Creek church. This is a 
part of one of the oldest churches in Southern Illinois 
(the Bushnell church), and embraces consider?ble terri- 
tory. Bro. Hahn realizes the weight of the .'".*-■-. L...C 
throwing his energies into the work which has already 
shown some growth. 

Spring Run. — The members here have been recently re- 
organized into a church. Two members of the Mission- 
ary Committee were present and were much pleased with 
the spirit of union and zeal manifested. Bro. D. E. Esh- 
elman will continue at this place another year, the church 
contributing toward his support. He will also fill the 
regular appointments for the Oak Grove (Pigeon Creek) 
church, which is as yet without a resident minister. 

A number of other points received due consideration, 
of which we can not now speak. The committee realizes 
that the work has grown to larger proportions and feels 
the weight of the responsibility resting upon it. 

The churches, through their delegates, have pledged 
themselves to raise $1,500 to carry forward the work the 
ensuing year, and the same has been apportioned on the 
basis of their state tax. May this consecrated means be 
used in the best possible way and for the advancement of 
the Lord's kingdom on earth, is the desire of the com- 
mittee. 

Send all money for missions to the undersigned. Boxes 
of goods and back numbers of our church papers, intend- 
ed for the Springfield mission, after Feb. 1 address Breth- 
ren's Mission, Cor. of N. Fourth and E. Grand Ave. 

Virden, 111.. Jan. 12. W. H. Shull, Sec. 



THE HAPPY, PROSPEROUS CHURCH. 

We look at such a church as being well organized, with 
her official body, — elder, ministers, a wide-awake set of 
deacons,— and the laity, whether few or many, all truly 
born of God, filled with the Spirit, having a burning de- 
sire for lost souls at home and abroad. She is seeking 
every opportunity to save the lost and how she may pro- 
tect her members from the evils of the world. She .has 
her regular preaching services; all the members who can 
be present are there and give inspiration to the speaker, 
and some of them are not afraid to tell him how much 
they appreciate his services. She has a prosperous Sun- 
day school, with a wide-awake superintendent and other 
officers, all ready to work in their several capacities. The 
children in the neighborhood are not neglected, but are 
invited to attend Sunday school, .and are made to feel 
that their presence is appreciated. 

The church has an organized Christian Workers' meet- 
ing that is well attended, especially by her young mem- 
bers. t There is no better place for the young to improve, 
their God-given talents fdr future usefulness than right- 
here. She has her quarterly council meetings. All mem- 
bers feel the Lord has need of them in the work and that 
they need her wise counsel. At these meetings the of- 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 26, 1907. 



63 



ficials may, or may not, as they see proper, have a short 
session prior to the opening of the meeting to ascertain 
whether everything is in proper shape to come before the 
meeting. The meeting is opened in the usual way with 
song and prayer, scripture reading; then all is ready for 
business. A report is given that all are in -love and 
union, and willing to still, labor for the kingdom of 
Christ. None of her members have been to vanity shows, 
or other places unbecoming saints. A brother in needy 
circumstances is reported, and two deacon brethren are 
chosen to go and supply his wants. A sick sister is re- 
ported and the members are requested to visit her, though 
very little admonition is needed along this line. 

The church also has a home mission board. This board 
reports a place on the outskirts where Sunday -school and 
preaching are called for. The church cqnsiders the mat- 
ter and decides to send a brother to arrange for the or- 
ganization of a Sunday school and a minister to conduct 
regular preaching services. The treasury is replenished 
and the council is closed, all feeling that it was good to 
bf there. 

In the homes of these brethren the lire on the family 
altar burns brightly, never going out, and they are ever 
pleading with their heavenly Father in behalf of one an- 
other, and that Christ's kingdom may be enlarged. They 
work as they pray, doing all they can. They have the 
pleasure of seeing souls saved, their children and chil- 
dren's children coming into the fold of Christ. They take 
the burden of the old standard-bearers upon themselves. 
Then these standard-bearers can now look back over a 
well-spent life, and with the Apostle Paul say: " I am 
now ready to be offered, and the time of my departure is 
at hand. 1 have fought a good tight; I have finished my 
course; I have kept the faith; henceforth there is laid up 
forme a crown of righteousness which the Lord, the right- 
eous judge, shall give me at that day. And not to me only, 
but unto all them also that love his appearing." 

Edgerton, Ohio. Christian Krabill. 

BATAVIA, MINN. 

The mission board of North Dakota, Northern Minne- 
sota and Western Canada has done much to strengthen 
the Lord's work at this place by sending the district 
evangelist, Eld. J. E. Joseph, to us. While here Bro. 
Joseph earnestly labored in the work of the Master. He 
preached the Word, the result of which has been the 
encouraging of the isolated members here, and many 
deep impressions on the hearts of those not members, 
that a speedy return to the apostolic methods of teaching 
and practice in religious work is the greatest need of the 
world of professors to-day. 

Our meetings were held in the Christian church here. 
Those not members, as well as members of the Christian 
church expressed wishes, for Bro. Joseph to return and 
be in our midst' again. Pray for the Lord's work, and 
especially for those living in isolation from the church. 

J. A. Patterson. 

R. D. 2, Box 43, Browerville, Minn., Jan. 14. 





MA TRIMONIAL 


" What therefore Coil has joined together, let not man p 


t asunder." 


llnn-lnge notices should bo accompanied by 50 cents. 



Egan-Hollinger. — At the home of the bride's parents, 
near Hagerstown, Md., Dec. 25, 1906, Bro. Elias Jay 
Egan, of Union Bridge, Md., and Sister Olive May Hoi- 
linger, the writer officiating. C. R. Oellig. 

Luton-Milner. — At Rouleau, Sask., Canada, Dec. 30, 
1906, Mr. Albert Luton, of Lenox, Iowa, and Miss Bessie 
A. Milner, of Fredonia, Kans. Agnes Milner. 

Shook-McRoberts. — At the home of the bride's parents, 
near Greene, Iowa, Dec. 31, 1906, by the writer, Bro. Paul 
D. Shook and Sister Myrtle A. McRoberts, both of 
Greene, Iowa. W. H. Lichty. 





FALLEN 


ASLEEP 


"Blessed 


are tlie dead 


vhich die 


in tlie X.ord. 1 * 


Death notieos 


of children undor ftvo ycr 


ra not published. 



Alley, Bro. Asa M., died of consumption in the White 
Rock congregation, Floyd Co., Va., Jan. 6, 1907, aged 50 
years, 5 months and 16 days. He was married to Mary 
Matilda Reed, Dec. 14, IS76. He joined the Brethren 
church about twenty-five years ago. The day before he 
died he was anointed. He was buried in the Alley bury- 
ing ground. He leaves a wife and eleven children. 

Cephas D. Reed. 

Cart, Sister Anna Bowman, daughter of Benjamin and 
Belinda Bowman, died in the bounds of the Lower Still- 
water church. Montgomery Co., Ohio, Jan. 3, 1907, aged 
54 years, 4 months and 12 days. June 6, 1875, she was 
united in marriage to Abraham D. Denlinger. As issue 
of such marriage six children were born, five of whom 
survive Uer. Dec. 31, 1897, she riccame a widow, and on 
April 1,^900, she was married to Adam Cart, who still 
remains. She was long a faithful member of the Brethren 
church. Interment at Ehrstine cemetery. Services by the 
Brethren. L. A. Bookwalter. 

Cosner, Rebecca, departed this life Jan. 4, 1907, near 
Gormania, W. Va. She was a consistent member of the 
Brethren church for fifty-five years. She was married to 
John William Aronhalt in 1853. To this union were born 
seven sons and seven daughters; two sons and three 
daughters preceded her to the spirit world. Funeral serv- 
ices by the writer. W. F. Nine. 

Danner, Elizabeth, nee Hoff, born in York county, Penn- 
sylvania, died at Summum, 111.. Dec. 27, 1906, aged 88 
years, 2 months and 23 days. She was married to Jesse 
Danner in 1845. To them. weFe born six children, four of* 



whom are living. The funeral services were conducted by 
Elders J. H. Baker and C. Fitz. 

Fannie B. Stambaugh. 

De La Rue, Sister Annie, died in the Philadelphia 
church, Pa.. Dec. 29. 1906, aged 82 years. The deceased 
sister was one of ■our oldest members. She lived a con- 
sistent Christian life. Her body was laid to rest at Ger- 
man town. Services by the writer. T. T. Myers. 

Eberly, Sister Catharine, wife of J. H. Eberly of W. 
Fulton street. Ephrata, Pa., died Jan. 2, 1907, at her home, 
of dropsy, aged 69 years and 7 months. She is survived 
by her husband, seven children, one brother and two sis- 
ters. Funeral services' were held by the brethren from 
Rev. 14: 13: Mazie Martin. 

Eichorn, Sister Elizabeth, wife of Henry Eichorn, died 
Jan. 9, 1907, of cancer in the stomach, aged 41 years and 11 
months. The writer was called to the house to conduct 
services. She was then taken to Cove, Md., where she was 
laid to rest. A husband and four children remain. Funeral 
services by David Hochstedler. Joel Gnagey. 

Forney, Sister Lizzie, wife of Bro. Isaac Forney, born in 
Nebraska City, Nebr., died in Phoenix, Ariz., Nov. 2!, 
1906, aged 46 years, 8 months and I day. She was mar- 
ried to Bro. Isaac Forney July 31, 1880. She had been 
in failing health for several years. One year ago she was 
stricken with paralysis, from which she never fully re- 
covered, although she was able to attend to her household 
duties until a few days before the end came. She was 
sick eleven days and died of paralysis of the heart. She 
leaves her companion, four daughters and one son, all 
members of the church except the youngest one of the 
family, who is thirteen years of age. She was a con- 
sistent member of, the Brethren church for twenty-live 
years. Two daughters preceded her, one in infancy. Sis- 
ter Forney was a great reader and a lover of good poetry. 
She lived in Arizona about seven j'ears. Funeral services 
were conducted in the Glendale church by Eld. Harvey 
Eikenberry. The remains were laid to rest in the Glen- 
dale cemetery. Bertha E. Furrey. 

Fouts, Sister Lillian, wife of Riley Fouts, died in, the 
bounds of the Poplar Bluff -church,- Mo., Jan. 1, 1907, aged 
22 years. She and Bro. Fouts were married May 18, 1896. 
To this union were born three boys and two girls. One 
boy preceded her to the spirit world eight years ago. She 
was a devoted wife and mother. Death was due to a con- 
gestive chill, she being sick about twelve hours. 

Payton Fouts. 

Gaunt, Sister Linnie, nee Kennedy, born in Clermont 
county, Ohio, died in the bounds of the Crowson church, 
Lawrence county, Tenn., Jan. 8, 1907, aged 35 years, 8 
months and 20 days. She came to Tennessee witli friends 
in 1S90; was united in marriage to Bro. C. E. Gaunt, Sept. 
S, 1S95; united with the Brethren church in April, 189S. 
She is survived by her husband and seven children, also 
by her father and several brothers and sisters in Ohio. 
Owing to distance from the cemetery only short services 
at grave were held, conducted by Eld. J. B. Lehman. 
Interment in Pleasant Grove cemetery. 

Mary L. R. Davis. 

Hepfer, Sister Rebecca, died in the Lanark church, Lan- 
ark, 111., Jan. 5, 1907, aged 71 years, 8 months ami 9 days. 
She was the widow of Bro. John S. Hepfer, who preceded 
her in death eleven years. She was born in Franklin 
county, Pennsylvania, her maiden name being Weaver. 
Sister Hepfer was a faithful and earnest member of the 
church. Tlie funeral and interment were at the Cherry 
Grove church, four miles north of Lanark. Text, Rev. 
14: 13. Sermon preached by the writer, Frank Myers as- 
sisting. I. B. Trout. 

Hershberger, Sister Mary, nee Steele, died Sept. 17, 
1906. in the Snake Spring Valley congregation, Bedford 
Co., Pa. Mother Hershberger was born in Woodcock 
Valley and was the second daughter of Eld. Jacob and 
Elizabeth Steele, of the Yellow Creek congregation, Bed- 
ford Co., Pa. She wis the wife of Bro. Daniel I lersh- 
bcrger, who passed, away about nine or ten years ago. 
She was the mother of twelve children, two of whom are 
still living. Two children, two brothers and one sister 
survive. She died from diseases incident to old age. She 
was confined to her bed a short time. Funeral services 
were held at the old homestead (the spiritual birthplace 
of the writer), after which the remains were taken to the 
Hershberger graveyard and laid to rest. 

Lizzie Rawlins. 

Kline, Bro. John, died at the home of his daughter, Sis- 
ter Smith, in Hampton, Pa., in the bounds of the Upper 
Conewago church, Jan. 4, 1907, aged 81 years, 3 months 
and 20 days, He lived a consistent and quiet life. He 
was a member of the Brethren church for many years. 
A short time before he died he asked for the anointing- 
Funeral services were conducted at the house by Elders 
D. H. Baker and C. L. Baker. Margie V. Wri-hts. 

Leatherman, Susan Kiilian, died Oct. 1, 1906, at her 
home in Milford, Ind., aged 51 years, 11 months and 2 
days. She leaves a husband, eight children, four brothers 
and two sisters. She was united in marriage to Conrad 
Leatherman, Nov. 20, 1873. To this union were born four 
boys and four girls. She united with the Brethren church 
in 1875, and was installed with her husband in the deacon's 
office a number of years ago. She remained loyal to the 
church. Services at the church at Gravelton by Bro. Peter 
Stuckman. Henry Wysong. 

Murray, Sister Leah, nee Aurand, born in Union county. 
Pennsylvania, died at Lanark, 111., Jan. 9, 1907, aged 8') 
years, 9 months and 8 days. When six years old her moth- 
er died. At the age of twelve she went to make her home 
with her sister, near Lewistown, Pa., where she remained 
until at the age of twenty-one, when she was married to 
Andrew Eshelman of the same place. To them were born 
nine children. Two died in infancy, and one in 1889. 
Soon after marriage they both united with the Brethren 
church and remained faithful until death. In 1872 the 
husband died. In 1881 she was married to Bro. Samuel 
Murray, with whom she lived happily until his death, 
March last. Since then she has made her home with her 
daughter in Lanark. She has been in feeble health for 
several years and for the last few month? has been almost 
entirely dependent upon others for care. Jan. 8 she was 
overcome by a stroke of paralysis from which she did not 
recover. Funeral conducted at Cherry Grove, by Eld. 
Henrv Martin, assisted-by the undersigned, from Rev. 14: 
13. " ... C. P. Rowland. 

Noffsinger, Bro. David, died in the -bounds of the Hur- 
ricane Creek, church, III., Jan. 12. 1907\ aged 54 years, 5 



months and 2$ days. He united with the church in 1S76 
and lived a consistent member. His wife, two sons and 
one daughter survive him. Funeral was preached by Eld. 
Chas. M. Yearout, assisted by Eld. Henry Lilligh, from Job 
1 ->: H. Wrii. H. Kctsing. 

Peak, Henry Otto, died of membraneous croup, at the 
home of his parents, in Los Angeles, Oil., Dec. 31, 1906. 
aged 5 years, 2 months and 21 days. He leaves lather, 
mother and two sister*. Services at cemetery by Bro. 
Wm. H. Wertenbaker. H. A. Frantz. 

Peters, Sister Sophronia, nee Layman, wife of friend 
J. W. Peters, died of consumption at Elsinore, Cal., Dec 
11, 1906, aged 32 years, 2 months and 13 days. She wa. 
united in marriage to J. W. Peters, Sept. 20, 1900. To 
this union was born one son. In the f.'.ll of 1906 she 
united with the Brethren church. Funeral services were 
held at the South Los Angeles church by Bro. Wm. H. 
Wertenbaker, .from Mark 14: S. II. A. Frantz. 

Ramey, Mary E„ of Kimball, Va., died Dec. 26, 1906, 
aged 77 years, 10 months and 12 days. Her daughter 
Charlotte preceded her March 25, 1906, aged about 32 
years. Daniel L., her husband, died July 12, 1904, aged 
about 84 years. They all were faithful members of the 
Brethren church. Three sons survive. Funeral service* 
conducted by J. A. Racer, Jr., from Psa. 90: 12. 

Grace E. Racer, 

Reed. Sister Nancy, died Jan. 10,. 1907, at the home of 
her son, Mr. O. W. B. Reed, in .Washington, D. C, aged 
67 years, 4 months and 5 days. While in her teens she 
united with the church, and lived a faithful Christian life, 
The late John K. Reed, of West Virginia, her husband, 
preceded her t'o the spirit world. She is survived by two 
sons and several daughters. Services at the house by Eld. 
Chas. D. Bonsack, her pastor. Her remains were taken 
to West Virginia for interment M.' C. Flohr. 

Rouser, John, of Miami county, Ohio, died Jan. 7, 1907, 
aged 71 years, 6 months and 11 days. Me never made any 
profession, although often at church services. He was a 
friend to the Brethren church. There was no regular fu- 
neral service. The writer conducted a short service at the 
grave. Interment in the Monroe cemetery. 

D. P. Sollenbergcr. 

Sala, Bro. Abraham, died in the Yellow Creek congre- 
gation, Elkhart Co., Ind., Dec. 26, 1906, aged 50 years, .1 
months and 25 days. He united with the church about 
twenty years ago. He leaves a wife, two children, on,' 
sister and two brothers. Funeral services conducted by 
Bro. Huber, assisted by M. R.oose. Amanda Miller. 

Schrock, Sister Elizabeth, wife of Benjamin Schrock, 
died in the Summit Mills church, Pa.. Dec. 8. 1906, of ulri 
aye, aged 86 years, 2 months and 20 days. Funeral serv- 
ices in the Summit Mills church by Eld. C. G. Lint, 

Joel Gnagey, 

Shaw, Sister Gertie V., died of consumption in the 
Dallas Center church, Dallas Center, Iowa, Jan. II, 1907, 
aged 22 years, 5 months and 5 days. She united with the 
church January, 1907; was anointed Doc, 21. 1906 She 
leaves a husband and two children, father, mother' and 
three brothers. Funeral services conducted by the writer, 
assisted by Bro. D. W, WK\ from John II: 28. 

Morris W. Eikenberry. 

Sheets, Bro. Salathicl, died in the bounds of the Poplar 
Bluff church, Mo., Dec. 31, 1906, aged 64 years, 11 months 
and 3 clays. He was married to Caroline Jordan, Dee. 11, 
1865. To this union were born eight boys and three girls. 
One daughter preceded him to the spirit home twenty-two 
years ago. Bro. Sheets united with the Brethren church 
forty year; ago. He was a devoted member. We was 
killed by a irec falling on him. Payton Fouts. 

Sherwood, Bro. John, died in the Philadelphia church, 
Pa., Dec. 3, 1906. aged 44 years. Deceased was sorely af- 
flicted for about twelve years. Two years ago he was car- 
ried into the water on a chair and was baptized He was 
happy in his Christian life. Funeral services by the writer. 

T. T. Myers. 

Shook, E. N. W., died Jan. 8, 1907, at his home at 
Preston, Minn., aged 51 years, 8 months and 11 days. 
Friend Shook met his death in the woods by the falling 
of a tree. He leaves a wife and one daughter, father, 
brother and two sisters. He was laid to rest in the Id'elb-, 
ren's cemetery, which is located on his farm. Funeral 
services conducted by the writer. !•'. B. Wolf. 

Smucker, Bro. Noah, died within the bounds of tlie Que- 
nirthoning congregation, near Sipcsville, Pa., Jan. 8, 1907. 
aged 69 years, 10 months and 7 days. Funeral services by 
the writer. P. J. Blough. 

Snyder, Sister Elizabeth, wife of our late Bro! Joseph 
G. Snyder, died in the Philadelphia church, Pa.. Dec, 17. 
1906, aged 58 years. Deceased was a faithful member ol 
the Brethren church for many years. She was buried al 
Gcrmantown. Services by the writer. T. T. Myers. 

Springer, Bru. Samuel, died at the home of his daughter, 
Sister Royer, at Morrill, Kans., Dec. 30, 1906, aged 91 
years, 8 months and 22 days. He was born in Washington 
county, Maryland. Funeral services conducted by Eld. 
Wm. Davies, assisted by John Eisenbisc, 

Minnie Meyers. 

Travcr, Bro. Lewis Henry, born in Grand Detour foSvn- 
shin. Ogle Co., 111., died Jan. 8, 1907, aged 41 years. 2 
months and 21 days. He was a member of the Brethren 
church for a number of years. He leaves a mother and 
an invalid father, who has been confined to his Led for 
about twenty-eight years; also three sisters. Funeral 
services conducted at the Pine Creek church, text, Psa. 
90: 1, by the writer. His remains were laid to rest in the 
Pine Creek cemetery. . C. C. Price. 

Turner, Sister Annie, died Nov. 25, 1906. aged 22 years 
and 3 months. She died of consumption. Sh,e leaves a 
husband, father, mother, five brothers and four sisters. 
She united with the Brethren church when about twelve- 
years Of age. A. A. Turner. 

Woods, Bro. Josiah, born in Rockingham county, Vir- 
ginia, died at his home in Flora, in the Bachelor Run 
church, Ind., Jan. 2, 1907, aged 86 years, 3 months, and 
26 days. He was married to Sarah Miller in Preble coun- 
ty, Ohio, Feb. 8, 1844. To this union five children were 
born. The oldest child and mother preceded him to the 
spirit world. Bro. Josiah and wife at one time served 
as deacons in the church, but had retired. His sickness 
was short. The funeral services were conducted at the 
church by Eld. A. G. Crosswhitc, after which the remains 
were taken to Kokomo and laid beside his wife. 

Mattie Welty. 



»UUu.WKVJ 



64 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— January 26, 1907. 



"The Other Half of the Globe 



»> 



By Eld. D. L. Miller 



A $1.50 Book for Only 45 Cents 



e~ 




% 



DESCRIPTION. 

In workmanship the book is, in ev- 
ery particular, first-class. The best 
of book paper is used, so as to show 
up the fine pictures to the best ad- 
vantage. The book is set up in large, 
clear type and bound in good cloth. 
It contains nearly 400 pages and is 
about 5^4 by 8 l / 2 inches in size. 
HOW TO GET IT. 
There is only one way to secure 
this valuable book and that is very 
easy. Just subscribe for the Messen- 
ger for one year and add 45 cents for 
the book. 
OUR COMBINATION OFFER. 
The Gospel Messenger, one 

year, $l.bl) 

"The Other Half of the 
Globe," 1-50 

The combination is worth, .$3.00 

We ask you, only.. ©X .0 5 

THE SECOND EDITION. 
Although we printed a very large 
edition of "The Other Half of the 
Globe," they have all been mailed 
out. A second edition of several 
thousand copies is now being ar- 

ranged for " RENEW NOW. 

If you have not already renewed your subscription, do so at once and get a copy 
of this second edition. 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE. Elgin, III. 



Go to California 

(To the Annual Meeting) 

In May===Bui 



P lan your trip to return over the Great 
Northern Railway. See the rebuilding 
of San Francisco. Visit Seattle, Taco- 
ma and the progressive cities of Puget 
Sound country. Take the daylight 
trip over the beautiful Cascade Moun- 
tains. Call on your brethren in the 
famouB Wenatchee Valley — see them 
In their comfortable homes, the results 
of thrift and irrigation. Stop off at 
Spokane, the metropolis of the Inland 
Empire. Study the great irrigation 
projects now being constructed In the 
Milk River and Lower Yellowstone Val- 
leys. Visit your friends and relatives 
in their prosperous colonies In North 
Dakota. Tou can do all this if your 
ticket reads over the Great Northern 
Railway. Such a ticket costs about 
912.50 more than If you returned by the 
same route, but Isn't It worth It? 
You see nearly 1.000 miles more of the 
country for this $12.50. Tickets will 
be good on the Oriental Limited or the 
Fast Mall — both trains carry standard 
and tourist sleeping cars. We are plan- 
ning to arrange a personally conducted 
party and should like to have you Join 
It. For further information regarding 
this personally conducted feature, for 
rates, folders and illustrated books 
on Washington, Montana and North 
Dakota address 

MAX BASS 

General Immigration Agent 

320 South Clark Street 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



■ 



• li • CmImuMc Way' 



Brethren Teachers' 
Monthly 

Thousands of subscriptions have been placed 
on our list the past few weeks for the 
Brethren Teachers' Monthly- It is being 
hailed with delight among the teachers and 
Sunday-school workers In general. 

It more than fills the place of the Sunday 
School Commentary, and the Advanced and 
Primary Teachers' quarterlies. These pub- 
lications have been discontinued and the 
" Monthly " launched on a broader field of 
helpfulness for Sunday-school workers In 
general. 

DEIJGHTED WITH IT. 

Denver, Colo., Jan. 12, 1907. 
Eld. I. B. Trout, Elgin, 111. 

My Dear Brother: — The January issue of 
the Brethren Teachers" Monily has reached us 
and 1 am delighted with it. Right now 1 will 
say that should you maintain this standard 
for the entire year the beginning of an epoch 
for something purely Christian, Intellectual 
and substantial in Sunday-school literature 
and help will be chronicled. I like the editor's 
way of putting things; aiso the variety of 
views expressed by the different contributors. 
For example, concerning the " days " in the 
creation, one says: '"Whether these days were 
twenty-four hour days, or whether they wi 
indefinite periods of time, is a matter of little 
moment, for in either case God is the great 
Creator of all things, . ." Another: "These 
days, then, are days of reconstruction — days 
of twenty-four hours each; not geological pe- 
riods." Another: "If you have the oppor- 
tunity, compare this poetical account with the 
latest scientific accounts of world-making, and 
note the fundamental and essential harmony." 
Though I, myself, have some definite opinions 
as to the " days," this variety of statements 
interests, stimulates and, I feel, cannot help 
but lead to the God who created all. Give us 
more like this number. 

Pardon this friendly criticism, but I felt like 
giving it. Your sincerely, 

N. J. Miller. 

- WILL CONVITJCE TOU. 

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OLD MISSIONS 

IN 

CALIFORNIA 

The Old Missions of California are visited 
yearly by thousands, and In planning your 
trip to the Annual Meeting, we suggest you 
visit at least one or more of the missions. 
They are located along the coast from San 
Diego to San Francisco, and were founded as 
follows: 

Mission San Diego, 1769. Mission San Juan 
1'aplstrano, 1776. Mission Luis Rey, 1798. 
Carmel Mission, 1770. Mission San Antonio 
De Padua, 1771. Mission Santa Barbara, 1786. 
Mission San Carlos, 1770. Mission Monterey, 
1772. San Gabriel Mission, 1769. 

These old missions were founded when Cal- 
ifornia was unknown, that whole country 
being then under Spanish rule. Most of these 
isslons are still in a good state of preserva- 
on. You should visit at least one, and for 
invenlenee we suggest you Include in your 
itinerary the San Gabriel Mission near tos 
Angeles, which can be easily reached by trol- 
ley cars. 

n the way to the Annual Meeting many 

points of great Interest will be included in the 

erary. Special train for the Brethren will 

be scheduled to include a stopover at Santa 

New Mexico, and visit the old churches, 

ie of them being over three hundred years 

old. Stop will also be made at Isleta, the 

Indian Pueblo, to vfsit these quaint people, 

10 follow the same customs that were in 

gue two hundred years ago. 

If desired, side trip to the Grand Canyon 

ay be Included. Stops will also be made 

through Southern California to visit the 

range grove districts. 

The special train via the Santa Fe will in- 

lude many pleasant and delightful features, 

and such as can only be seen through the his- 

c Southwest, New Mexico, Arizona and 

Southern California. 

If you contemplate a trip to California be- 
fore the Annual Meeting write us for rates 
and Illustrated literature. Folder showing 
special train features for the meeting mailed 
; on application. 

T. J. BLACK, Fasoeng-er Traffic manager, 

Santa Fe Railway Company, 

1117 Railway Exchange, Chicago, 111. 



Wanderings in Bible Lands, — By D. L. 
Miller. Regular price, morocco, |3.00; 
now, SI. 50, regular price, library, (2.50; 
now, 91.00; regular price, cloth, (2.00; 
now 80 cents 



Special Trains 

Omaha, Nebr., Jan. 16, 1907. 
To the Brethren and Their Friends: 

As you all know we have been looking for- 
ward, for vears. to when the Annual Meeting 
would he held in California. The suspense Is 
over. We all know the meeting is to be held 
in Los Angeles. California, next May. 

Now for many this will be a trip of a life- 
time that in the past has been looked for- 
ward to and In the future will be talked about 
to their children and grandchildren. 

Many of you have met me at the Annual 
Meeting for the past sixteen years, advocating 
that this meeting go to California. Now it 
is the intention of the Union Pacific that you 
all see as much of the country going and re- 
turning as possible. Not only along the 
Union Pacific but along other railroad lines. 
To that end itineraries have been prepared 
that will permit you to go either via Omaha, 
Kansas City or New Orleans, returning by 
some other route. You can leave either Kan- 
sas City or Omaha, go by way of Denver, see 
Colorado Springs, the Garden of the Gods, 
Pike's Peak, the Royal Gorge, Eagle River 
Canyon, Grand Hivet Canyon, passing through 
Frulta, Junction City, where the Brethren 
have meetinghouses, then to Salt Lake City, 
then through Nampa, Payette. Weiser, and 
manv points in Oregon, where you can notify 
the Brethren to meet you at the train, then 
to Butte Valley. California, where you may 
attend the dedication of the new church, then 
through Sacramento, see them rebuilding San 
Francisco, then down the Coast Line where 
for a hundred miles you can throw your ap- 
ple cores and peach seeds from the car win- 
dow Into the Pacific Ocean, arriving in Los 
Angeles in time for the Annual Meeting, or 
you can take the same trip as far as Ogden 
or Salt Lake City and go either by the way 
of the New Salt Lake Route to Los Angeles 
direct or across the Great Salt Lake by rail- 
road for forty miles, then through Nevada 
and over the Sierra Nevada Mountains, where 
the Brethren like D. L. Miller say: "There is 
no finer scenery than this trip over the Sierra 
Nevadas, seeing Blue Canyon, Cape Horn, the 
original Gold Diggings that were established 
in 1819, thence to Sacramento and down the 
Coast Line or through the San Joaquin Val- 
ley, where the Brethren have many congre- 
gations, and on through to Los Angeles, and 
on vour return trip pass up over the far- 
famed Shasta Line in sight of old Mt. Shasta, 
14.000 feet high, visiting Butte Valley. Port- 
land, the Brethren In Oregon and Idaho, then 
over various routes back to your starting 
point." 

You will rrote that the Union Pacific is not 
confining you to their line alone, but is of- 
fering you the opportunity of a lifetime to 
visit points where you will see beautiful seen- 
erv, grand canyons, old historical land points, 
and all direct from the window of your 
through train without any side trips and ad- 
ditional fare for railroad beyond your first 
outlay for your railroad ticket to Los Angeles 
and return. 

It will afford me great pleasure to give you 
further information as to routes, rates, etc., If 
you will only ask for it. 

Fraternally yours, 

GEO. L. McDONAUGH. 




NELSON'S TEACHERS' BIBLES 



Self-Pronouncing. 

This edition contains the following helps: 
The Concise Bible Dictionary, which forms the helps to 
Nelson'3 Teachers' Bibles, is based on the Illustrated Bible 
Treasury, written by leading scholars in America and Great 
Britain, each one a recognized authority on the subject on 
which he writes. It supplies in the most condensed and con- 
venient form all the latest information about the Bible, its 
writers, its language, the various Versions, complete Chro- 
nology, Life of Christ with Harmony of the Gospels, Life 
and Travels of Paul, etc. 
The Illustrations are reproduced from recent photographs and truly illustrate 
the articles where they appear. 

The Combined Concordance combines Complete Concordance, Subject Index, 
Scripture Proper Names, Obsolete and Ambiguous words in one A-B-C list. It 
also gives the correct pronunciation and interpretation of Scripture Proper Names 
and has over 10,000 references to the revised version where it differs from the King 
James version. 



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BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, III. 



The Gospel Messenger 



"SET FOR THE DEFENSE OF THE GOSPEL."— Phil. I 



"s 



Vol. 46. 



Elgin, III., February 2, 1907. 



V 



& 



^> 



No. 5. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. ficiency of the army and navy. It would have been in- 
Editorial,— teresting if that could have been the main issue in the 
Abusing the Sign /\ elections, for then the people would have had a chance 

History of Churches, 73 to say whether they are tired of paying - so much for 

The New Religion 73 ,-, Ti . ,, , , 

"The Twelve Apostles" for our Ministers 73 warlike purposes. It was hardly reasonable to sup- 
Where Summer Never Ends, 74 pose that they would vote to abandon territory wliich 

The Stranger Who Wants Money, . ..^ 74 - , ... £ ,, s ., „,. , . 

- Some Old Manuscripts 74 promises great things for the future. The people of 

Dealing in Lands 74 no country are likely to vote to abandon territory 

Two Doctrinal Sermons a Month 74 t* i i i 4 u ■ * i c i 

_ which has once come under their control. Some day 

Essays, — . J 

Doing Things by Rule. By James M. Neff, 66 the people may have a chance to vote on the army ques- 

Was the Death of Christ Reasonable? By I. S. Long, 66 tJ on alone. 

Tithing. By G. A. Shamberger, 67 

God's Personality, or How God Acts as a Person T, Tr . j D i a „„t n , ».„ *.i,„ 1 i t r r 

Acts. By John E. Mohler, : 6S The ^legates to the annual labor conference ot 

The Brethren in Advance. By Flora E. Teague, ..6S British and Irish trade unionists, by a very large ma- 

^EYsSSEw ^SS^^'p^SkSSS. 69 i° rit ^ re i £Cted te P r °P° sed ^ndment to their con- 
The Round Table, — stitution, which reads as follows: "This annual con- 
Where are We? By A. Hutchison, 70 f erence h ereby declares that its ultimate object shall 

Faith. By J. S. Flory, 7U J J 

Are You Choosing Barabbas? By Wm. Conner, ..70 be the obtaining for the workers the full results of 

How it Happened. By Lillian Warner; 70 their labors by the over throw of the present competi- 

1908 Program. By I. N. H. Bealim, .- 70 ; * ' ' 

Short Sermons from Books. [J. W. Waylandj, ..70 tivc system of capitalism and the institution of public 

The Fall. By D. E. Stover 70 ownership and control of all means of life." The dele- 

HO T[a?" d HTlHt y A"tiien S . By C. W. Guthrie, 71 S ates representing eight hundred and thirty-five thou- 

Sisters' Aid Societies, 71 sand laborers opposed the amendment and those rep- 
General Missionary and Tract Department,- resenting ninety thousand favored it. This vote indi- 

Live Preachers Needed, 75 ° J 

From Bulsar, India. By Eliza B. Miller 75 cates that British trade unionists are as much opposed 

From Sweden By J M Risberg, ■-■■■-■" 75 to « making socialism the ultimate aim of the labor 

Few, Most and All. By I. N. H. Bcahm, 75 & 

^^^^^^^^^^^_______^_^^^^^^^^^^_^_„ movement as are their brothers in the United States. 

a p r\ it at r\ T J-l F IV O R F n Their representatives in parliament have given admir- 

t!ni ^_ x _ ) g-pjigsaagBgsasBgTOgae-i ..j.. ....,..,.., -^-_ i . arj le service for the cause of labor and for the British 

~ r~ ,, 11..1TTO i nation. They know what they want in the way of leg- 

Simon Guggenheim, the newly-elected U. S. senator . .. - J , . ,7 

. ,-, . . . ... , , ,. . islation and have gone out earnestly and systematically 

from Colorado, is a wealthy man, and secured his elec- ? , , , , 

. ., r , . ~,, ■ L \ , to get it. hxpenence leaches them that they do not 

tion by the use of his money. Other men now in that , . ,. ,, J 

, . . . . ,, ., c ,, , . need socialism. 

body have done the same, though some of them not in so 

creditable a manner. And since his election he has tak- Wisconsin is said to lead in water power, though 
en an unusual and commendable step in severing hi-- much of it is undeveloped. The Fox River is the 
connection with the Smelter Trust and other business nearest approach to full development, producing thirty- 
interests, in order to devote himself to the service of e two thousand horse power, which is much below the 
his country. This is what others should do, must do, maximum. There are several other water-power 
if we are to have the kind of government we need. The rivers winch are practically untouched by development. 
men of wealth must take an interest in the welfare The Wisconsin, Black, Flambeau, Chippewa, Menomi- 
of the country, for they can afford to. And what is nee and others will produce almost unlimited power. 
good for the state is also good for the church. The And these rivers are admirably situated for the 
men who can afford to give up business are the ones economical development of power, in many places 
to set an example in service. having high banks, inviting the -construction of dams. 

„ „ : : ' 7~ ■ ■ There are large swamp and marsh areas where the 

Premier Clemenceau recently issued a circular , , . . _ , , . „ 

, . , . , . r ii- ■ -r- water can be stored and the flow made steady. To 

which aims at the suppression ot gambling in hrance. . . . , , . , . 

_, FF * to _ have power without consuming fuel is a great ad- 

I here is gambling almost everywhere in France, es- , , ,. . ... , , 

. ,, & , „f . , - , . vantage, and the district with good water power has 

pecially in the Riviera and all the southern resorts, , . ' , 

i.ii . , , , , r ' i f much m its favor, 

which have flourished solely because ot the games ol — 

chance allowed in their casinos. Agents from these Simalu, one of the Dutch East India islands, was 

places hastened to- Paris to see what could be done, devastated by a tidal wave Jan. 11. Other islands 

If the law is enforced it means ruin for these places, also suffered; but not so severely. One report has it 

The foreigners are the ones who leave behind them that altogether about eighteen hundred persons per- 

streams of gold. Many visit these resorts mainly be : ished, and Simalu was practically engulfed. The in- 

cause there is so much gambling. It seems to be the habitants are from the island of Sumatra. They are 

proper thing for those who go to gamble. If all the very indolent, but are divided into tribal factions which 

wrong and dishonesty and suffering and sorrow caused fight each other until sometimes an entire faction is 

by losses in these places of evil could be known, surely destroyed. In this respect they do not differ greatly 

not many upright people would favor them. And from the feudists of parts of Kentucky. They are 

yet, strangely enough, the man who is seeking to stop afraid to live alone; their huts afe grouped together 

gambling in France has no moral objection to it. on a natural or. artificial eminence and encircled by 

„,.„. P _ ,. ditches or palisades. 

Some weeks ago Emperor William of Germany dis- 

solved the Reichstag because it refused to vote the For twelve years New Zealand has had a law of 
money he thought necessary to use to maintain and de- compulsory arbitration. There can be no strike or 
velop the German possessions of West Africa. The lockout until the difference between employer and em- 
socialists were largely instrumental in defeating the ploye has been passed upon by a government comrtlls- 
government, and they expected to gain enough in the sion. Though there is a difference of opinion on the 
elections to have their way. But the elections were subject, the law seems to have been a success. This 
held last week,' and they lost instead of gaining, and may be one reason why there is now in Canada some 
the hands' of the government have been greatly talk of a law to prevent strikes and lockouts until the 
strengthened by the endorsement of the people. A difference has been investigated and the award made 
part of the socialist program was to make large reduc- public. The investigation would be compulsory only 
tions in the amount spent each year to increase the ef- where public utilities are affected. Some favor a law 



of this kind and some bitterly oppose it. One paper 
says : " Compulsory arbitration would place all the 
industries under its jurisdiction in a condition of vir- 
tual military service. The men would be denied the 
right to strike, and their wages and working condi- 
tions would be determined by official authority. This 
would involve interference with personal freedom and 
with corporate enterprise that would never be tolerated 
in Canada." But some peaceable way to settle dif- 
ferences should be found, will be found. 



Strikers were summarily dealt with in Mexico 
•when they destroyed property early last month. There 
had been trouble for a couple of months, but finally 
through the efforts of President Diaz a compromise 
was made and the miners agreed to go to work. But 
on the morning when they were to begin they were 
met by a woman who called them cowards. Instead 
of going to work they began to destroy property and 
to rob. The next day at a neighboring town they re- 
sisted the troops, and thirty strikers were killed and 
eighty wounded. A few days later as a large body 
of them were going to work, seven of the leaders of 
the mob were executed by a squad of soldiers; one of 
the number was the president and another the secre- 
tary of the workmen's union. The Mexicans, as well 
as .some other people, have yet to learn that using vio- 
lence is a very poor way in which to try to settle dif- 
ferences. 



Monday of this week was certainly a day of acci- 
dents. At the stockyards in Chicago the explosion of 
an ammonia tank resulted in several deaths and more 
injuries. An explosion in a mine at Redeu, Rhenish 
Prussia, caused three hundred men to be buried there. 
More than half the bodies have been recovered. And 
there was an explosion of fire damp in a coal mine in 
the Courriercs district, France. There were over eight 
hundred men in the pit; but only three of them were 
killed. In this same district, less than a year ago, over 
a thousand men were killed by a mine explosion. On 
Monday a typhoon struck Hongkong, China, destroy- 
ing many lives and much shipping. 



Tin; Interstate Commerce Commission investigated 
the relations of common carriers by rail to the produc- 
tion and distribution of oil. The report contains grave 
charges against the Standard Oil Company. One of 
them is that " the ruin of its competitors has been a 
distinct part of the policy of the Standard Oil Com- 
pany, systematically and persistently pursued." Other 
points are that it is a monopoly from well to consumer; 
that its dividends are illegitimate; that there have been 
secret railroad rates and making of tariffs to crush 
competition ; that there is a system of espionage by 
which competition is killed; that the company has de- 
ceived the public by buying out rivals and running the 
concerns under the old names; that oil inspectors have 
been tampered with; the methods are called unfair and 
disreputable, and the policy is said to be one " without 
decency or conscience;" the pipe line more than any- 
thing else has contributed to the monopoly. And the 
conclusion is: " Under these conditions it may become 
necessary to the uprooting of established wrongs and 
the prevention of others that the government shall fix 
in the first instance the rates and regulations for the 
transportation of this traffic. This method has been 
adopted by the legislature of one State. It probably 
wi' 1 be found nece'ssary to dissociate in the case of oil 
in that of other commodities the function of trans- 
portation from that of production and distribution." 
Without doubt, many of the evils arising from monop- 
oly will be removed. It will take time, but it is well to 
go slow enough to be sure that the right course is be- 
ing taken. 




»—* ■ — — ^agawKg 



tHE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— February 2, 190?. 















Loo A Y o - 




"Study to 


she 

be 


>v thyself approved unto God, a workman that 
ashamed, rightly dividius the Word of Truth. 


needeth no* 



A MEMORY. 
The fire upon the hearth is low 

And there is stillness everywhere: 

Like troubled spirits, here and there 
The firelight shadows fluttering go. 
And as the shadows round me creep 

A childish treble breaks the gloom. 

And softly from a farther room 
Comes: " Now I lay me down to sleep." 

And somehow with that little prayer, 
And that sweet treble in my ears, 
My thought goes back to distant years 

And lingers with a dear one there; 

Again I hear the child's Amen, 

My mother's face comes back to me; 
Crouched at her side I seem to be, 

And mother holds my hand again. 

O, for an hour in that dear place! 

O, for the peace of that dear time! 

O, for the childish trust sublime! 
O, for a glimpse of mother's face! 
Yet as the shadows round me creep 

I do not seem to be alone — 

Sweet magic of that treble tone- — 
And, "Now I lay me down to sleep." 

— Eugene Field. 



DOING THINGS BY RULE. 
BY JAMES M. NEFF. 

When I was a boy at home there was represented 
in the neighborhood a religious order whose ministers 
frequently came there to preach. The Gospel they 
brought was of the good old kind and it was usually 
delivered with force and power, but there was little 
evidence of it in the lives of their people as lived be- 
tween Sundays. I often think of the remark of a 
thoughtful old gentleman with reference to them. He 
said, " Those people come as near preaching the whole 
Gospel and practicing none of it as any people 1 ever 
knew."' On the other hand, the Brethren had the 
reputation of not only preaching the Gospel, but 
practicing it. And I have often been glad that ours 
is a church that believes in doing things. So much 
importance, in fact, is attached to the matter of doing 
that the church has adopted rules or measures by 
which it is believed that the membership will be helped 
in the strict conformity of their lives to certain gospel 
teachings. Our Conference, for instance, has recom- 
mended a uniform order of dress as a means of main- 
taining the gospel principle of nonconformity to the 
world. She has recommended the organized Sunday 
school as an aid to the gospel injunction of bringing 
up our children in the nurture and admonition of the 
Lord, and the organized mission boards as a means to 
the effectual carrying out of the " Go ye " of Matt. 
28:19. 

To me it is a somewhat remarkable fact, however, 
that some of the ardent supporters among us of the 
above measures are so much afraid of " doing things 
by rule " as applied to Christian giving. I could never 
understand why we should adopt a rule for the main- 
tenance of nonconformity to the world in dress and 
then be afraid of a rule designed to carry out a much 
more important principle. One of the things, in fact, 
that is making the position of our church on the dress 
question distasteful to a number of pious, intelligent 
people is the fact that more zeal is often manifested 
in its defense than in that of other gospel practices 
equally worthy of our support. 

It is unfortunate for the church that the adoption 
of any of these rules has become necessary. If there 
had never been a tendency to worldliness among the 
members I presume our Conference would never have 
considered it necessary to adopt any rules to with- 
stand it. If our membership were now known to be 
giving as much as one-tenth of their increase, or 
more, to the support of the Lord's work, I presume 
the question of tithing wculd not now be agitated. 
But since our giving is so very far below what it ought 
to be, the adoption of this rule would certainly be 
justifiable if in it we can see any possible hope of 
increase in our church benevolences. 

This matter of honoring the Lord with our sub- 



stance I consider of sufficient importance that I be- 
lieve it would be just as proper to adopt a rule for its 
enforcement and administer discipline for the viola- 
tion of that rule as it is to do so with reference to the 
matter of dress. And yet I do not think that oui 
Annual Meeting should decide in favor of tithing as 
a rule to be enforced, but rather as a basis of giving 
to be recommended to the membership. In fact, this 
should be the status of all our decisions in which we 
adopt means of our own devising to any gospel end. 
And what possible harm could come from a recom- 
mendation by Conference that our members give at 
least one-tenth of their income to the support of the 
Lord's work? This would be binding no Jewish yoke 
upon our necks. No yoke about it; simply a recom- 
mendation, with a hint perhaps that a Christian should 
be behind a Jew not a whit in any good thing. 

But what shall we do with 2 Cor. 9:7? There 
Paul says that giving should be according as a man 
" purposeth in his heart," and this has been considered 
by some as opposing the adoption of any rule of giving. 
How shall we get around it? Well, we will not get 
around it. We don't want to get around it. I am 
not in favor of the adoption of any measure that makes 
it necessary to get around any scripture. Paul had 
already laid down the principle (1 Cor. 16:2) that 
our giving should be proportionate to our increase. 
Now he lays down the additional principle that all 
giving ought to be heart-purposed and cheerful. Some 
have supposed that the meaning of Paul's language 
here is that if a man purposes in his heart to give, 
well; but if he purposes not to give, it is just as well. 
Not a word of it ! Some think that while God loves a 
cheerful giver, if a man can't give cheerfully and so 
does not give at all, God loves him just as well. Not 
a word of it! Does he say, "As a man purposeth in 
his heart, so let him give or keep "? Not a word of 
it! But if a man dare not refuse to give and dare 
not give grudgingly, how is he to escape the possible 
dilemma? Why, he must let the Lord work him 
over until he can give cheerfully. 

Look at the logic of it for a moment. Giving to the 
support of the Lord's work is a good tiling, but if a 
man doesn't purpose in his heart to give, he is excused 
from it. Now cheerful service is just as essential in 
other directions as in giving. What advantage comes 
to a man in being baptized, washing his brethren's feet 
or observing the communion if he does it grudgingly 
or of necessity? Not a particle. This logic, then, 
would lead us to the position that if a man purpose in 
his heart to be baptized, wash feet and commune, well ; 
but if he doesn't want to do it, he doesn't need to. 
In other words, we may keep the commandments if 
we feel like it, and if we don't it's all right anyhow. 
It is such logic as anyone would be ashamed of when 
he sees the force of it. The fact is, as it seems to 
me, whoever tries to prove that a Christian is justified 
in giving less than one-tenth of his income to the Lord, 
is likely, before he gets through, to prove more than 
he started out to prove, or otherwise get himself into 
a predicament, An attempt to keep down or to lower 
the standard of duty in any direction appears to me of 
very doubtful propriety. ■ 
Lake Arthur, New Mexico. 



WAS THE DEATH OF CHRIST REASONABLE? 
BY I. S. LONG. 

The moral man sees no good in Jesus' death. He 
is willing to stand in the judgment and be judged 
according to his works. There are quite a good many 
people of this sort in America. But I think there is 
no doubt that the Hindoo far outrivals the westerner 
in respect to depending on his own goodness for sal- 
vation. As to what will become of the soul after 
death, the average Hindoo is very ignorant. His 
ideas of salvation are therefore quite hazy. Whatever 
salvation is, they point out three ways of obtaining it 
—the ways, respectively, of knowledge, faith and 
zvorks. In this part of India, those who hope for 
salvation by either of the first two ways, I may say, 
are very few. The majority hold .that it is just and 
right to be judged according to works. They maintain 
that there is and can be no other way, and, moreover, 
that no other way is needed. 



It is evident that if this idea is correct, that Jesus' 
death is not only unreasonable but that he died in vain, 
simply arguing will not convince the moral man or the 
Hindoo. It is done " not by might nor by power, but 
by my Spirit, saith the Lord of hosts." The moral man 
is good, mi his own eyes; the Hindoo is his match; 
neither will confess to sinning, or, if perchance con- 
victed, either will wave the arm about and point to 
weak Christians, contemptuously asking, " Do you 
think I am no better than they?" Then one does 
feel bad, for it is a confessed fact, known best of all 
to the devil and his followers, that some — too many — 
professed Christians are weak and sickly. Neverthe- 
less, the fact remains that " all have sinned and come 
short of the glory of God." 

Man in all ages has been a failure, as to righteous- 
ness. Paul, in Rom. 1 : 18-32, shows how that the 
Gentiles, though they knew God, did not like to retain 
him in their hearts. Professing themselves to be wise, 
they changed the glory of the incorruptible God into 
various images. As time went on men became utterly 
base, in consequence of which God had to give them 
over to do every sort of unseemly work. The Gentiles 
have had six thousand years to rid themselves of sin. 
Is sin decreasing or multiplying? 

Think of what God did for the Jews! Didn't they 
have his oracles? Hadn't they seen his numerous and 
mighty works? Didn't God send them leaders, judges, 
kings and prophets? Ought they not to have grown 
better and nobler as the years rolled on? But how 
did Christ find them? Those who considered them- 
selves the best, and were likely so considered by the 
rank and -file, he denounced in dreadful invectives. 
Matthew 23. After thousands of years Jesus found 
much sin in the world. So the Jews were also great 
failures as to righteousness, " I judge righteously." 
For weighed in the balances of men, even Belteshazzar 
and the Pharisee, who went up into the temple to pray, 
were both doubtless excellent men. 

Man, then, evidently needs a Savior from sin. This 
is clear and reasonable. If a man cannot save himself, 
of course he cannot save another. To accomplish 
man's salvation, another — one born of flesh — is needed, 
a sinless, powerful one, who is able to keep from 
falling those saved ones who continually trust in him. 
There has been only one such — JESUS. How does 
he have such power? He became a ransom, was made 
a propitiatory offering, and so in our stead bore our 
sins and carried our sorrows. He completely paid the 
penalty for sin. He redeemed a guilty world. It 
was the innocent for the guilty, the just for the unjust. 
On all sides we are asked: " Was that right or just? " 
Before we answer, the other fellow does, saying, 
" No, it is downright unrighteousness. Away with 
such talk; we will have none of it." 

A hired man truly puts his employer under obligation 
to pay him wages. In his case it is a matter of debt. 
But take the beggar, for example. Has he any right 
really to ask help? Has he earned — put the giver 
under obligation to give assistance? Another. Have 
the heathen done anything in remuneration for the 
love and life poured out upon them from Christendom? 
Nothing. Missionary effort is grace, all of grace. 
Has the helpless child the wherewith to repay its 
mother for the aches suffered and the tears shed in 
its behalf? Apart from love, has it a right to expect 
the incessant care it gets? Impossible! When this 
old world of ours had gone prodigal, had lost itself in 
sin, and in four thousand years had not " come to 
itself," but rather like a lost sheep never could find 
its way back to the Father's fold, did man deserve that 
Jesus leave the "glory" to seek and save the lost? 
Who says, YES ? None. 

In each of these cases what is given is nothing less 
than " free gift," undeserved favor. The beggar has 
real need, the heathen are without a Savior, the infant 
is helpless, the world is lost. Who says the almsgiver 
is unrighteous? Who, having the Spirit of Jesus, is 
not a missionary? Who condemns a mother's love? 
" Freely ye have received, freely give." Who cen- 
sures Carnegie for being charitable'? Jesus is the 
ocean of mercy, — the millionaire of grace. If, in his 
love, he gives us the free grace, gift of salvation, and 
thus does for man what man was utterly incapable of 
doing for himself; and if he has satisfied both the 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— February S>, 1907. 



67 



claims of a holy law and the righteousness of a holy 
God, by dying that the sinner might be forgiven and 
justified, who calls him unjust? Who says unreason- 
able? Who? 
Jalalpor, Sural, India. 



TITHING. 
BY G. A. SHAMBERGER. 

To begin with we cite Abram, Gen. 14:19, 20; 
'"And he. blessed him and said, Blessed be Abram of 
the most high God, possessor of heaven and earth ; 
and blessed be the most high God, which hath delivered 
thine enemies into thine hand. And he gave him 
tithes of all." Abram gives a tenth of the spoils — 
not as a duty — but as a privilege. Jacob says, Gen. 
28:20-22, "If God will be with me. and will keen 
me in this way that I go, and will give me bread to 
eat and raiment to put on, so that 1 come again to 
my father's house in peace ; then shall the Lord be my 
God ; and this stone which I have set for a pillar shall 
be God's house : and of all that thou shalt give me I 
will surely give the tenth unto thee." Jacob promises 
upon certain conditions to give a tenth— not a i duty 
— but as a privilege. Israel as a natiri;. Num. 
18:20-26 ( "And the Lord spake unto Aaron, Thou 
shalt have no inheritance in their land, neither shalt 
thou have any part among them : I am thy part and 
thine inheritance among the children of Israel. And, 
hehold, I have given the children of Levi all the tenth 
in Israel for an inheritance for their service which 
they serve, even the service of the tabernacle of the 
congregation. Neither must the children of Israel 
henceforth come nigh the tabernacle of the congrega- 
tion, lest they bear sin and die. But the Levites shall 
do the service of the tabernacle of the congregation, 
and they shall bear their iniquity: it shall be a statute 
forever throughout your generations, that among the 
children of Israel they have no inheritance. But the 
tithes of the children of Israel which they offer as 
an heave offering unto the Lord I have given to the 
Levites to inherit: therefore I have said unto them, 
Among the children of Israel they shall have no in- 
heritance. And the Lord spake unto Moses, saying, 
Thus speak unto the Levites and say unto them, When 
ye take of the children of Israel the tithes which I 
have given you from them for your inheritance, then 
ye shall offer up an heave offering of it for the Lord, 
even a tenth part of the tithe." Israel gives a tenth 
as a duty. The giving of a tenth is based upon the 
fact that the Levites had no inheritance. Since they 
had no inheritance they shared equally with the rest 
by receiving the tenth. A tenth part of the tenth 
was offered to the Lord — likely for the priests. For 
festival purposes, at the place chosen of God, a tenth 
was given every third year. Deut. 14 : 28, 29. "At 
the end of three years thou shalt bring forth all the 
tithe of thine increase the same year and shalt lay 
it up within thy gates. And the Levite, because he 
hath no part fior inheritance with thee, and the 
stranger and the fatherless and the widow which are 
within thy gates, shall come and shall eat and be 
satisfied, that the Lord thy God may bless thee in 
all the work of thine hand which thou doest." Coming 
to the New Testament we find in the matter of giving, 
Zacchsus saying, ; The half of my goods I give to 
the poor." The widow cast in "all the living that she 
had." Jesus would commend these, but we do not 
infer that it is our duty to do likewise. From the 
foregoing and what follows we are under no obliga- 
tion to give tithes. 

1. No inference for the giving of the tenth as a 
duty can be drawn from the Old Testament. 

2. No inference for tithing can be drawn from the 
New Testament, (a) From the sayings of Jesus. 
(6) From the acts of Jesus, (c) From the sayings 
of the apostles, (d) From the acts of the apostles. 

3. No inference for tithing can be drawn from 
the history of the church for the first three centuries. 

4. From the early church we draw a clear in- 
ference to give according to ability. Acts 11: 28, 29, 
"And there stood up one of them named Agabus and 
signified by the Spirit that there should be great 
dearth throughout all the world, which came to pass 
in the days of Claudius Caesar. Then the disciples 



every man according to his ability determined to send 
relief unto the brethren which dwelt in Judaea." 

5. Faul speaks pointedly about giving, 1 Cor. 16: 
1, 2, " Now concerning the collection for the saints, 
as I have given order to the churches of Galatia even 
so do ye. Upon the first day of the week let every one 
of you lay by him in store as God hath prospered him, 
that there be no gatherings when I come." 2 Cor. 9: 
5, 6, 7, " Therefore I thought it necessary to exhort 
the brethren that they would go before unto you and 
make- up beforehand your bounty, whereof ye had 
notice before, that the same might be ready as a 
matter of bounty, and not as of covetousness. Bui 
this I say, He which soweth sparingly shall reap also 
sparingly; and he which soweth bountifully shall reap 
also bountifully. Every man according as he pur- 
poseth in his heart, so let him give; not grudgingly 
or of necessity; for God loveth a cheerful giver." 
Notice the word necessity. Suppose we should pass 
an order demanding the tenth, how would we escape 
this word? All have the privilege of tithing and more 
if they choose. We conclude. that Christian giving 
should be governed by ability, prosperity and heart 
purpose. For the church to go beyond this or fall 
short of it is without warrant from heaven, and 
spiritually disastrous. 
M ant on, Canada. 



A PASTOR ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 
Rev. Harvey E. Simon, pastor _of the Trinity 
Lutheran Church, Ashland, Ohio, has been refusing 
to take part in the services when members of his flock 
were buried by secret orders. For his conduct in this 
respect he has been severely criticised, and was finally 
urged to explain his position in reference to secret 
orders. The pressure became so strong that he finally 
announced that he would, in a sermon, explain, fully. 
This was a signal for a full house, and many lodge 
men were present. His discourse was a long and 
strong one, and was the next day" the general topic of 
conversation. By request the entire sermon was pub- 
lished in the Ashland Times-Gazette of Jan. 14 and 
was then read by hundreds who we,re^iot permitted to 
hear it. Below will be found a part of the discourse. 
We are certain that it will be read with interest by the 
Messenger patrons : 

It will be necessary for us to clear away some old- 
time prejudices before we can deal with the real theme. 
\x\ our discussion as in our observation we are first 
of all confronted with a matter that is apparently in- 
different, but as it is one that is much vaunted by 
secret orders, and one that has been much used as a 
blind for the eyes of sincere men and women, we 
shall not ignore it. It is the " surface goodness " of 
these organizations. I am quite sure that I know as 
many churchmen that are secret society men as you 
do; and with sorrow I confess it, I know many more 
preachers that are members of secret societies than you 
do. But I know another thing, and that is this : The 
devil has always had his stool-pigeons. There was 
a day when there were possibly as many preachers 
advocating slavery as there are preachers in secret 
societies to-day; there was a day when it was con- 
sidered quite the thing for a preacher to go into a 
saloon and take a glass of whatever best suited his 
taste. To-day the devil has been robbed of these two 
classes of stool-pigeons; and you might have sus- 
pected, if you had but thought of his cunning, that 
he would invent a new variety. Without a surface 
goodness to vaunt in the eyes of men evil could not 
long exist in the world. If the devil would only keep 
right on roaring, and did not stop to make up his 
toilet as an angel of light, he would be an easy victim 
and we should have little to apprehend on his account; 
but darkness retires into the secret chambers and light 
plays on the surface. You may multiply churchmen 
and preachers affiliated with secret societies by ten, 
and still you can argue nothing from it. A1J the sur- 
face goodness of Judea was gathered about the cross 
mocking and jeering: and oh, .what darkness was be- 
neath that covering, while the light of heaven hung 
suspended between two thieves. 

But this boast is surely much overdone. There have 
been many great and good men even of our own land 



that have not only not allied themselves with any 
secret society, but have acted and spoken against them. 
Mr. Moody is recognized as possibly the greatest of 
the modern school of evangelists. Some of you are 
his ardent admirers. He was not only opposed to the 
whole principle of secretism, but his advice to the 
ministry was to give out the truth on this subject, and 
if men on that account left church to let them go. 
There is probably not a man here who docs not know 
the place of Wendell Phillips in the life of our nation 
as an orator and as an advocate of reform movements. 
His delivery on the subject of secret societies is : 
" Secret societies are not needed for any good purpose. 
and may be used for any evil purpose whatsoever; 
such organizations should be prohibited by law." 

Daniel Webster has possibly been unsurpassed as an 
orator since the days of Demosthenes. You who have 
read his speeches know something of the power of this 
great man. He was not only not a lodge man, but 
speaking from the standpoint of the state said, " In 
my opinion, the imposition of such obligations ;i- 
Freemasonry should be prohibited by law." 

In the volume on "American Statesmen of the 
World's History and Its Makers," in my library, arc 
biographies of men who have dealt and dealt success- 
fully with the gravest political questions that have ever 
confronted us as a nation. Among these biographies 
are the following: Daniel Webster, "The Expounder 
of the Constitution," to whom we have already re- 
ferred; William H. Seward, "Anti-slavery Champion "; 
Charles Sumner, "The Scholar in Pontics;" to these 
ought to be added the names of many who do not 
appear in this volume, but who have been honored 
with positions of greatest trust and responsibility, such 
as Millard Filmorc, president of the United States; 
John Marshal, chief justice of the United States; 
William Wirt, attorney general of the United States; 
all uniting in condemnation. You can easily sec thai 
if your pastor is in error in his condemnation of the 
secret society, his error is shared by a right honorable 
body of statesmen, who spoke not from a Christian 
standpoint but from a political when ihcy condemned 
lodges. 

I believe, too, that you ought to know that they stand 
condemned by many honorable bodies of Christians, 
among whom are the sturdy United Presbyterians, the 
Wesleyan Methodists, the Free Methodists, the German 
Baptist Brethren, and by far the larger part of the 
Lutheran church, including three great general bodies, 
viz: the General Council, the Synodical Conference. 
commonly called the Missouri Synod, and the Joint 
Synod of Ohio and other States. Are there, possibly, 
after all two sides to this question, or have these slates- 
men and Christians all been blinded by prejudice? If 
it were so, we should still have to ask ourselves the 
question, How did they contract their prejudices? 

A claim that has been most enthusiastically ad- 
vocated is that these societies are charitable organiza- 
tions. At best the charity practiced by these orders as 
orders is the charity of the priest and the Levite in our 
Lord's parable of the Good Samaritan. If the solemn 
promises and oaths Inean anything they mean that you 
will pass by poor, struggling humanity in order to 
help a brother Mason or Oddfellow as the case may 
he; and if these same vows of brotherhood mean any- 
thing they mean unnatural divisions in the Christian 
church. Is there, then, a bond that is stronger than 
the bond of Christian brotherhood? It is the only 
bond that unites us to the one Father through the 
Elder Brother. Christ Jesus. It hardly seems possi- 
ble that a whole-souled Christian should care for a 
brotherhood outside of the family in heaven and on 
earth, named after the Lord Jesus Christ. But we 
are speaking of secret society charity. Is it really 
engaged in gathering in the lame, the blind, the sick, 
and the poor? If this were our observation we should 
be willing to concede much. But these know better 
than to knock at your doors for admission ; whatever 
your attitude toward your members, you see to it that 
"no dependent, or likely soon to become dependent, 
persons are admitted. 

Now as to the charity: a man has come into the 
lodge; he has paid his dues faithfully; on this con- 
dition he received the assurance that he should have 
certain sick benefits; the time of need comes, and the 



6S 



THE GOSPEL MESSENGER.— February 2, 1907. 



lodge in the name of sweet charity pays a debt which 
it could not evade without disgrace ; or the sickness 
proves fatal, and again this benevolent institution 
conies to the wife and children and wins their lasting 
gratitude for paying the insurance which the husband 
and father purchased and paid for. The inti'irsion of 
any thought of charity in such a case ought to be 
resented as a gross and inexcusable insult. It is said 
that the Odd Fellows pay out in benefits about one- 
third of the dues received, and that this is by far the 
greatest proportion of any of the social secret societies- 
Whatever agreement we might have -entered into, 
I am afraid you would resent my calling it charity, 
if after you had intrusted into my keeping nine dollars, 
when you found yourself in an emergency I should 
offer you three dollars out of the nine. But is there 
really anything about these societies that can in any 
way be construed or contorted into any semblance of 
charity ? 

In the first instance, the man who really needs theii 
help because of the physical disability or because cf 
loss of social standing, or because of financial reverses, 
is forever excluded by these very misfortunes from 
all participation in your brotherhood, and thus from 
any share in your benevolences. I do not know that 
any one has ever accused the priest, in the parable 
of the Good Samaritan, of being so heartless as not 
to have helped a brother priest in trouble. You ought 
to know that it was just because he passed by the 
poor, unfortunate man who was not a priest that he 
received the unqualified condemnation of our Lord. 
And. after all. the only charity of which you can- 
boast as secret societies is such a charity as the priest 
and Levite would gladly have practiced if the op- 
portunity had presented itself. Do you not see that 
this which you call a charitable organization is noth- 
ing more or less than a dragging of the Oriental caste 
system into our boasted civilization? You seek to 
bring into your caste only the strong, the prosperous, 
those who have social standing. You leave out of the 
account entirely the blind, the lame, the lepers and the 
poor ; and these are the only ones that charity takes 
into account ; they are the ones that move the great 
heart of our Lord. 

Now when some one of your caste meets with a re- 
verse you hasten to his relief, and then have the audac- 
ity to parade it as an act of great benevolence. I cannot 
vouch for the truth of it, but I am told that thieves 
have this same charitable feeling for each other, and 
that they will come to the rescue of a comrade just 
as you do. I do not know, because I have never beard 
thieves boast of their charity. 

There is just one point in which the ancient caste 
system seems to have a little the better of the modern, 
at least I have never heard of a Brahman being ex- 
eluded from the benefits of his caste because the mails 
that carried his dues happened to be delayed. I do 
know a number of men who carried the burden of the 
dues of their lodge, paying into it something of the 
comforts of the home; carried the burden until they 
felt they could carry it no longer, and then suspended 
the payment of dues. In a few instances protracted 
sickness came soon after, and I have the testimony of 
these same men and of their friends that not a single 
brother lodgeman came to their relief or to the relief 
of their distressed families. But it is true that these 
may be exceptional cases, and so I shall put the ques- 
tion plainly and bluntly for anyone present to answer 
if he cares to take the trouble. How far does lodge 
charity extend beyond the payment of dues? 

The claims of antiquity are not being much urged 
because of their ridiculousness. And yet not so many 
years ago your pastor was speaking to a man with 
regard to his duty in the matter of becoming a Chris- 
tian, and he replied in the calmest manner, " My order 
is not only better, but it is older than your church. 
Why." said he, " Solomon was a Freemason." For- 
tunately your pastor happened to know more of the 
history of the oldest modern secret society than this 
ehthusiastic member, and if you know nothing except 
that which you have learned in the ritual he knows 
more on that subject than you do. He knows that the 
principle upon which modern secretism rests was re- 
vealed, or shall I say concealed? in the garden of Eden, 
when the devil, ashamed to appear open and above 



board, concealed himself in the body of a serpent; he 
knows that this principle existed at least until the time 
of our Lord ; for is he not dealing with the whole prin- 
ciple of secretism, which is nothing more or less than 
an effort to get into the dark, so that others may not 
see our works, when he says, " For everyone that 
doeth evil hateth the light, neither cometh to the light 
lest his deeds should be reproved. But he that doeth 
truth cometh to the light that his deeds may be made 
manifest that they are wrought in God"? 

I recall the logic of that fearless orator and keen 
thinker, Wendell Phillips: "Secret societies are not 
needed for any good purpose." Are they? Do they 
help in the propagation of Christianity? I want to 
bear the testimony of experience. The hardest men on 
earth to win for the cause of Christ are the lodge men. 
Do they enhance patriotism? More than one great 
statesman has denounced them as a menace to national 
well-being. Are they needed for the promotion of 
sweet charity? We have already spoken on this point. 
Just as evident as is the first statement of Phillips is the 
second, " They may be used for any bad purpose what- 
soever." If it had been true that no evil had ever been 
planned in their secret recesses, yet the fact that they 
are especially adapted for such use makes them a men- 
ace to the cause of righteousness. 



GOD'S PERSONALITY, OR HOW GOD ACTS AS 
A PERSON ACTS. 
BY JOHN E. MOHLER. 

[Note. — In tire several articles the writer may present 
tinder the above heading he does not intend to teach 
truths unknown or unaccepted by Christians in general, 
but merely to delineate more minutely what the doctrine 
of the personality of God consistently means. And be- 
cause some features of God's personality are pointed out 
none should assume that we can comprehend God. For 
we can comprehend him only as far as he " acts as a per- 
son acts," and within human limits. And, indeed, we can- 
not comprehend anything at all which is foreign to human 
experience. And when he is studied in the light of what 
man would do, man's actions must of course be regarded 
as at their wisest and best.] 

As a Creator. 

1. Had man had the planning of creation he would . 
not have been^ satisfied to have all living beings of 
his own order, for he delights in the presence of low- 
er orders of life, birds, bees, fowls, and domestic an- 
imals. Likewise God loves the presence of an order 
of beings lower than himself, and so he created man, 
and the angels, and lower orders. 

2. Man delights in associating with the fruits of 
his labors; in his garden, in his fields, along his farm 
lanes, among his stock, poultry, and trees. Likewise 
we read of God, early in the age of man's living upon 
earth, walking in the garden where man was; "in 
the cool of the day," in the midst of his creations. 

3. Man insists upon his authority over his produc- 
tions. Not only is grass wanted as a turf, tame briers 
kept within bounds, trees and hedges pruned, and 
weeds kept down, but machines must run smoothly, 
buildings keep their places, and the domestic ani- 
mals obey his directions. Likewise God commands 
obedience and the observance of laws in all his crea- 
tions, from the stars in the firmament to the man who 
hears with ears and sees with eyes. Is there anything 
strange about this? Is it not just what man would 
do, were he in God's place ? 

4. Man loves to please that in which he takes great 
comfort. What toys he will purchase for his children! 
What comforts for his wife! What horses and bug- 
gies for his youth ! And what sweet, sound grains 
for his stock, and what warm barns for their com- 
fort ! Likewise God made the earth beautiful for man, 
happy for birds, safe for worms, and a place where 
vegetation might laugh in its perfection. 

5. Man is anxious for the safety of that which he 
values. He bolts his granaries and houses ; walls his 
sheepfold; clothes his family against the elements; 
teaches his boys and girls ways of conduct which shall 
bring to. them the good and not the evil. He will even 
inflict pain in a surgical operation upon a loved one 
in order to save life. Likewise God surrounded his 
creatures with protection. He placed good upon every 
side of them. Also beauty and harmony. And the 
only danger in the garden he warned them against 
most emphatically. And where they ran into danger 



he quickly removed them before they partook of eter- 
nal life to keep them eternally under the curse. 

6. Man wants all devotion to himself to be pure love 
and not terror or force. He does not value the obedi- 
ence of a child from fright or force ; or companionship 
of friends compelled by force ; or purity of life because 
of force, or fright. But that which is valued in human 
association is prompted by love. Then is it strange 
that 'God wanted the companionship and purity of 
man maintained by love? And that he left the man 
free to choose whether he would cling to him, or dis- 
obey him? And after man turned away from God 
should God value anything but a voluntary, willing, 
loving return to him? Would you, were you in God's 
place ? 

Oh, it is reasonable, the way God acts, for would 
not we do the same in his place, with his wisdom? 

Maaistique, Mich. 



THE BRETH